National Labour Organisation

National LabourN.Lab.National Labour PartyNational Labour Committeehis alliesLab.Nat.
The National Labour Organisation, also known as the National Labour Committee or simply as National Labour, was a British political group formed after the 1931 creation of the National Government to co-ordinate the efforts of the supporters of the government who had come from the Labour Party.wikipedia
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1931 United Kingdom general election

19311931 general election1931 election
The sudden decision to call a general election in October 1931 left MacDonald and the other Labour supporters with the difficult job of organising their own re-elections without any form of organisation.
The Conservatives began pressing for the National Government to fight an election as a combined unit, and MacDonald's supporters from the Labour Party formed a National Labour Organisation to support him; MacDonald came to endorse an early election to take advantage of Labour's unpopularity.

Labour Party (UK)

Labour PartyLabourBritish Labour Party
The National Labour Organisation, also known as the National Labour Committee or simply as National Labour, was a British political group formed after the 1931 creation of the National Government to co-ordinate the efforts of the supporters of the government who had come from the Labour Party.
The new cabinet had four Labourites (who formed a "National Labour" group) who stood with MacDonald, plus four Conservatives (led by Baldwin, Chamberlain) and two Liberals.

Herbrand Sackville, 9th Earl De La Warr

The Earl De La WarrEarl De La WarrLord De La Warr
Frank Markham (MacDonald's Parliamentary Private Secretary) and the junior minister Earl De La Warr set up a National Labour Committee to run the election.
He was later one of the few Labour politicians to follow Ramsay MacDonald in the formation of the National Government and the National Labour Organisation.

Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
At the start of the election, MacDonald denied Labour Party claims that the funds had come from the Conservative Party.
In 1931, following the collapse of the Labour minority government, it entered another coalition, which was dominated by the Conservatives with some support from factions of both the Liberal and Labour Parties (National Labour and National Liberals).

William Jowitt, 1st Earl Jowitt

William JowittSir William JowittLord Jowitt
MacDonald himself tried to intervene and on the day after the election was announced complained that Attorney-General Sir William Jowitt had been forced out of Preston and the Conservatives could not find a local association willing to accept him.
William Allen Jowitt, 1st Earl Jowitt, (15 April 1885 – 16 August 1957) was a British Liberal Party, later National Labour and Labour Party politician and lawyer, who served as Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain under Clement Attlee from 1945 to 1951.

National Government (United Kingdom)

National GovernmentNationalNational Independent
The National Labour Organisation, also known as the National Labour Committee or simply as National Labour, was a British political group formed after the 1931 creation of the National Government to co-ordinate the efforts of the supporters of the government who had come from the Labour Party.
The new cabinet had four Labourites (now called "National Labour Party") who stood with MacDonald, plus four Conservatives (led by Baldwin and Chamberlain) and two Liberals.

Frank Markham

Sydney Frank MarkhamSir Frank MarkhamMarkham, S. F.
Frank Markham (MacDonald's Parliamentary Private Secretary) and the junior minister Earl De La Warr set up a National Labour Committee to run the election.
Having fought Guildford for Labour in 1924, he was elected for that party at the 1929 general election as MP for Chatham, and defected with Ramsay MacDonald to become a National Labour MP just before standing down at the 1931 general election.

1935 United Kingdom general election

19351935 general election1935 election
At the 1935 general election, the party sponsored 20 candidates, eight of whom were elected.
The National Labour vote also held steady, but the resurgence in the main Labour vote caused over a third of their MPs, including party leader Ramsay MacDonald, to lose their seats.

Kenneth Lindsay

Kenneth Martin Lindsay
The Parliamentary constituency had a National Labour MP, but the two LCC seats were held by Labour and the pact agreed that Kenneth Lindsay would run in conjunction with one Municipal Reform candidate in the election.
Kenneth Martin Lindsay (16 September 1897 – 4 March 1991) was a Labour Party politician from the United Kingdom who joined the breakaway National Labour group.

Nottingham South (UK Parliament constituency)

Nottingham SouthNottingham South BCNottingham, South
All that Stonehaven would offer was Nottingham South, where the Conservative Association might be persuaded to support Jowitt if the sitting National Labour member George Wilfrid Holford Knight stood down.

Ramsay MacDonald

James Ramsay MacDonaldMacDonaldRt Hon. Ramsay MacDonald
The most prominent Labour Party member involved in the government was the Prime Minister, Ramsay MacDonald.
They responded by forming a new National Labour group, which provided a nominal party base for the expelled MPs, but received little support in the country or the unions.

Godfrey Elton, 1st Baron Elton

Godfrey EltonLord Elton
An editorial in the first edition written by Allen emphasised that the News-Letter was "intended to be a means of contact between Labour supporters of the National Government", but also "begs the attention of public opinion", The editorship was later taken by Godfrey Elton and both Allen and Elton received peerages from MacDonald.
He was a strong supporter of Ramsay MacDonald, whose son Malcolm MacDonald had been his pupil at Oxford, and followed him into National Labour.

Derwent Hall Caine

Caine BaronetCaine of Greeba CastleDerwent
Local Conservatives refused to withdraw their candidates, and in Liverpool Everton, sitting National Labour MP Derwent Hall Caine found himself opposed (and eventually beaten) by a Conservative.
When the Labour government collapsed in 1931, he carried on supporting Ramsay MacDonald as a National Labour MP.

Malcolm MacDonald

The Right Honourable '''Malcolm MacDonaldGovernor-General Malcolm MacDonaldMacDonald
When Ramsay MacDonald's son, Malcolm, fought the Ross and Cromarty by-election of 1936, he found himself opposed by Randolph Churchill standing as a Conservative and arguing that 'National Labour' was a "sham device" with no real support.
MacDonald held his seat in the 1931 general election as a National Labour candidate, and continued to build up a reputation as a highly competent minister.

Harold Nicolson

Sir Harold NicolsonHarold George NicolsonHon. Harold Nicolson
He noted that National Labour could attract to collectivist socialism, some who were put off by the resolutely working-class character of the Labour Party and cited Harold Nicolson as a case in point.
Nicolson entered the House of Commons as National Labour Member of Parliament (MP) for Leicester West in the 1935 election.

Clifford Allen, 1st Baron Allen of Hurtwood

Clifford AllenBaron Allen of HurtwoodLord Allen
Early in 1932 a constitution and organisation was established and the monthly News-Letter set up for supporters which was edited by Clifford Allen.
He was raised to the peerage as Baron Allen of Hurtwood, of Hurtwood in the County of Surrey, on 18 January 1932, to boost Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald's National Labour representation in the House of Lords.

J. H. Thomas

James Henry ThomasJimmy ThomasJ.H. Thomas
James Henry Thomas (3 October 1874 – 21 January 1949), sometimes known as Jimmy Thomas, was a British trade unionist and Labour (later National Labour) politician.

Stephen King-Hall

William Stephen Richard King-Hall(William) Stephen Richard King-HallCommander Sir Stephen King-Hall
In February 1942, Stephen King-Hall resigned from the Parliamentary Party, stating that he wanted to oppose the involvement of party political considerations in wartime.
He entered the House of Commons in 1939 as Member of Parliament (MP) for Ormskirk unopposed, standing as the National Labour candidate.

Lord President of the Council

Lord PresidentThe Lord President of the CouncilLord President of the Privy Council
MacDonald remained Prime Minister as the head of a coalition government until June 1935, when he gave way to Stanley Baldwin and became instead Lord President of the Council.

Wednesbury (UK Parliament constituency)

WednesburyWednesbury BCthat town
In July 1932, a by-election arose in Wednesbury, a seat that Labour had held at every election except 1931.
The National Government, comprising four parties (National Labour, Conservatives and two factions of the LIberal Party), went to the country in a general election in October 1931.

Abraham Flint

Abraham John FlintA.J. Flint
He briefly enjoyed a political career, being elected to the House of Commons by the narrowest majority under universal franchise and serving for a single term as a supporter of National Labour.

James Lovat-Fraser

James Alexander Lovat-Fraser
James Alexander Lovat-Fraser (16 March 1868 – 18 March 1938) was a British Labour Party and then National Labour politician.

1936 Combined Scottish Universities by-election

Combined Scottish Universities by-election193627–31 Jan. 1936
A by-election in a Unionist-held seat would therefore normally have been contested by a Unionist candidate, but in this case there was a need to find a seat for Ramsay MacDonald of National Labour, who had been defeated in his Seaham constituency at the 1935 general election.

Philip Snowden, 1st Viscount Snowden

Philip SnowdenLord SnowdenSnowden
Philip Snowden, who as Chancellor of the Exchequer had been second only to MacDonald in becoming a prominent Labour member of the National Government, remained nominally one of the National Labour cabinet members after the election, having received a Peerage.

Leicester West (UK Parliament constituency)

Leicester WestLeicester, WestLeicester West BC
It is among the small minority of net Labour-favouring English seats not siding with the Conservatives in part of the 1930s when they co-governed with the National Labour Organisation including Sir Ramsay MacDonald.