National Land Fund

Land Fund
The National Land Fund of the United Kingdom was created in 1946 to secure culturally significant property for the nation as a memorial to the dead of World War II.wikipedia
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National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty

National TrustThe National TrustNT
Nevertheless, despite this under-utilisation, substantial areas of land and numerous buildings were donated to various charities, of which a principal beneficiary was the National Trust.
Historically, the Trust acquired land by gift and sometimes by public subscription and appeal, but after World War II the loss of English country houses resulted in many such properties being acquired either by gift from the former owners, or through the National Land Fund, later the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the National Lottery.

Hugh Dalton

Edward Hugh John Neale DaltonDalton[Hugh] Dalton
Proposed by Chancellor of the Exchequer, Hugh Dalton, the fund was confirmed in section 48 of the Finance Act 1946 with a sum of £50 million.
In addition, the National Land Fund was established.

Finance Act

Finance BillFinance Act 1994Finance Act 1920
Proposed by Chancellor of the Exchequer, Hugh Dalton, the fund was confirmed in section 48 of the Finance Act 1946 with a sum of £50 million.
The 1946 Act established the National Land Fund and much of National Savings and Investments.

National Heritage Act

National Heritage Act 1983in 1983National Heritage Act 1980
The Fund was abolished in the National Heritage Act 1980, replaced by the National Heritage Memorial Fund.
The National Heritage Act 1980 established the National Heritage Memorial Fund, abolished the National Land Fund, made provision for property to be accepted in satisfaction of taxation and provided for indemnities for objects on loan from museums and libraries.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
The National Land Fund of the United Kingdom was created in 1946 to secure culturally significant property for the nation as a memorial to the dead of World War II.

Chancellor of the Exchequer

ChancellorSecond Lord of the TreasuryChancellors of the Exchequer
Proposed by Chancellor of the Exchequer, Hugh Dalton, the fund was confirmed in section 48 of the Finance Act 1946 with a sum of £50 million.

National Heritage Memorial Fund

Heritage Memorial FundPanel of the Heritage Memorial Fund
The Fund was abolished in the National Heritage Act 1980, replaced by the National Heritage Memorial Fund.

Cragside

Cragside House
Girouard placed Cragside at the top of the list; in 1977, the house was acquired by the Trust with the aid of a grant from the National Land Fund.

The Ramblers

Ramblers' AssociationRamblersRamblers Association
As Chancellor in 1946 he started the National Land Fund to resource national parks, and in 1951 as Minister of Town and Country Planning he approved the Pennine Way, which involved the creation of seventy additional miles of rights of way.

Mentmore Towers

MentmoreCrafton StudMentmore Estate
The possible purchase of Mentmore for the nation through the government's National Land Fund was the desire of Roy Strong, the director of the V&A, who hoped that Mentmore would become a "branch" of his museum devoted to 19th-century decorative arts as Ham House was for the 17th century and Osterley was for the 18th century.

Chartwell

Chartwell HouseChartwell ManorChartwell,
This unfinished work, undertaken by Monet from his balcony at the Savoy Hotel, subsequently formed a significant element in the negotiations between the executors of Churchill's estate and the National Land Fund over the gifting of many of Chartwell's contents to the National Trust in lieu of death duties.

Cockayne, North Yorkshire

Cockayne
The overwhelming part of the 1925 acre Bransdale estate was transferred to the National Trust through National Land Fund procedures in 1972 and comprises all the farmland and a small amount of woodland in the valley.

The Georgian House, Edinburgh

The Georgian HouseGeorgian House
On the death in 1956 of the 5th marquess of Bute, Nos 5, 6 and 7 passed through the Land Fund procedures to the National Trust for Scotland (NTS) in part satisfaction of death duties.