National Liberal Federation

NLF
The National Liberal Federation (1877–1936) was the union of all English and Welsh (but not Scottish) Liberal Associations.wikipedia
62 Related Articles

Liberal Party (UK)

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
The National Liberal Federation (1877–1936) was the union of all English and Welsh (but not Scottish) Liberal Associations.
The establishment of the party as a national membership organisation came with the foundation of the National Liberal Federation in 1877.

William Harris (Birmingham Liberal)

William HarrisThe Caucus
Its structure – which became known as the "Caucus" – was modelled on that of the Birmingham Liberal Association, which had been so effective in building a mass membership and an efficient electioneering body in the city under the political leadership of Joseph Chamberlain, and drawing on the strategic and organisational skills of William Harris (secretary 1868–73) and Francis Schnadhorst (secretary 1873–84).
He was dubbed the "father of the Caucus", the highly organised and controversial Liberal party machine that had its origins in Birmingham, but was afterwards introduced at national level to the National Liberal Federation.

Francis Schnadhorst

Its structure – which became known as the "Caucus" – was modelled on that of the Birmingham Liberal Association, which had been so effective in building a mass membership and an efficient electioneering body in the city under the political leadership of Joseph Chamberlain, and drawing on the strategic and organisational skills of William Harris (secretary 1868–73) and Francis Schnadhorst (secretary 1873–84).
He briefly held elected office on Birmingham Council, and was offered the chance to stand for Parliament in winnable seats, but he found his true metier was in political organisation and administration both in his home town as secretary of the highly successful Birmingham Liberal Association from 1867 to 1884, and nationally as secretary of the newly formed National Liberal Federation from 1877 to 1893.

The Newcastle Programme

However, in its political orientation generally the NLF conference tended to take the Radical approach, most clearly in its support of the Newcastle Programme in 1891 (see below).
The Newcastle Programme was a statement of policies passed by the representatives of the English and Welsh Liberal Associations meeting at the annual conference of the National Liberal Federation (NLF) in Newcastle upon Tyne in 1891.

Caucus

caucusesparty caucusWomen's Caucus
Its structure – which became known as the "Caucus" – was modelled on that of the Birmingham Liberal Association, which had been so effective in building a mass membership and an efficient electioneering body in the city under the political leadership of Joseph Chamberlain, and drawing on the strategic and organisational skills of William Harris (secretary 1868–73) and Francis Schnadhorst (secretary 1873–84).
In 1877 the newly formed National Liberal Federation was given a similar structure, on the initiative of Joseph Chamberlain, and again worked out in detail by Harris.

David Lloyd George

Lloyd GeorgeRt Hon. David Lloyd GeorgeBritish Prime Minister David Lloyd George
They, together with secretary Robert Hudson, remained staunch supporters of H. H. Asquith and as a result Lloyd George had to keep his own National Liberal organisation in place between 1918 and 1922.
Asquith rebuked him, but was ignored, and they reached an agreement in principle on 2 December, then together they presented Lloyd George's plans to the National Liberal Federation on 26 February 1926.

Walter Foster, 1st Baron Ilkeston

Sir Balthazar FosterSir Walter FosterWalter Foster
1886–1890: Walter Foster
In 1886, he was made President of the National Liberal Federation, where he played a large part in keeping Chamberlain's supporters loyal to William Ewart Gladstone.

John Massie

Massie, John
1903–1907: John Massie
In 1894 he was elected a member of the Executive of the National Liberal Federation.

Ramsay Muir

Ramsay Bryce Muir
1931–1933: Ramsay Muir
Muir was also a leading figure in the National Liberal Federation (NLF), being its chairman from 1931–33 and president from 1933-3.

George Lunn (British politician)

George Lunn
1918–1920: George Lunn
He instead took office as the Chairman and President of the National Liberal Federation, serving until 1920.

Arthur Brampton

1920–1931: Arthur Brampton
He served as president of the Birmingham Liberal Association for almost twenty years, while from 1920 to 1931 he was the chairman of the National Liberal Federation, then from 1930 to 1933 he served as its president.

Francis Layland-Barratt

Sir Francis Layland-BarrattLayland-Barratt, Sir Francis
1927–1934: Sir Francis Layland-Barratt
He served as Treasurer for the National Liberal Federation from 1927 until his death.

Bingley Hall

Bingley Hall New Bingley Hall
The inaugural conference of the National Liberal Federation (NLF) was held in Bingley Hall, Birmingham, on 31 May 1877, with the objective of promoting Liberalism, encouraging the formation of new associations and the strengthening and democratising of existing local Liberal parties.

Birmingham

Birmingham, EnglandCity of BirminghamBirmingham, United Kingdom
The inaugural conference of the National Liberal Federation (NLF) was held in Bingley Hall, Birmingham, on 31 May 1877, with the objective of promoting Liberalism, encouraging the formation of new associations and the strengthening and democratising of existing local Liberal parties.

Liberalism

liberalliberalssocially liberal
The inaugural conference of the National Liberal Federation (NLF) was held in Bingley Hall, Birmingham, on 31 May 1877, with the objective of promoting Liberalism, encouraging the formation of new associations and the strengthening and democratising of existing local Liberal parties.

Joseph Chamberlain

ChamberlainJoseph The Right Honourable '''Joseph Chamberlain
The conference was chaired by Joseph Chamberlain and addressed by Liberal leader William Ewart Gladstone.

William Ewart Gladstone

GladstoneWilliam GladstoneW. E. Gladstone
The conference was chaired by Joseph Chamberlain and addressed by Liberal leader William Ewart Gladstone.

H. H. Asquith

AsquithAsquithianHerbert Henry Asquith
They, together with secretary Robert Hudson, remained staunch supporters of H. H. Asquith and as a result Lloyd George had to keep his own National Liberal organisation in place between 1918 and 1922. For example, in 1914 the NLF came out in support of women's suffrage, and H. H. Asquith (who was personally opposed to the measure) decided it should receive government support.

Irish Home Rule movement

Home RuleIrish Home RuleHome Rule for Ireland
In the Liberal split over Irish Home Rule the NLF was loyal to party leader Gladstone rather than its own progenitor Joseph Chamberlain, who left the Liberal party and formed the Liberal Unionist faction and coalition with Conservatives.

Liberal Unionist Party

Liberal UnionistLiberal UnionistsUnionist
In the Liberal split over Irish Home Rule the NLF was loyal to party leader Gladstone rather than its own progenitor Joseph Chamberlain, who left the Liberal party and formed the Liberal Unionist faction and coalition with Conservatives.

Radicalism (historical)

radicalRadicalismradicals
However, in its political orientation generally the NLF conference tended to take the Radical approach, most clearly in its support of the Newcastle Programme in 1891 (see below).

Factory Acts

factory reformFactory ActFactories Act 1844
Here it endorsed the extension of the Factory Acts, the introduction of universal male suffrage, an end to plural voting and the reform of the House of Lords.

Universal suffrage

universal adult suffrageuniversal franchiseuniversal male suffrage
Here it endorsed the extension of the Factory Acts, the introduction of universal male suffrage, an end to plural voting and the reform of the House of Lords.

Plural voting

plural votersplural votesfamily voting
Here it endorsed the extension of the Factory Acts, the introduction of universal male suffrage, an end to plural voting and the reform of the House of Lords.

House of Lords

LordsBritish House of Lordspeer
Here it endorsed the extension of the Factory Acts, the introduction of universal male suffrage, an end to plural voting and the reform of the House of Lords.