National Monument of Scotland

National MonumentScottish National Monument
The National Monument of Scotland, on Calton Hill in Edinburgh, is Scotland's national memorial to the Scottish soldiers and sailors who died fighting in the Napoleonic Wars.wikipedia
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Calton Hill

CaltonGreenside playfieldCalton Prison
The National Monument of Scotland, on Calton Hill in Edinburgh, is Scotland's national memorial to the Scottish soldiers and sailors who died fighting in the Napoleonic Wars.
Calton Hill is also the location of several iconic monuments and buildings: the National Monument, the Nelson Monument, the Dugald Stewart Monument, the old Royal High School, the Robert Burns Monument, the Political Martyrs' Monument and the City Observatory.

Edinburgh

Edinburgh, ScotlandCity of EdinburghCity of Edinburgh council area
The National Monument of Scotland, on Calton Hill in Edinburgh, is Scotland's national memorial to the Scottish soldiers and sailors who died fighting in the Napoleonic Wars.
Also a contributing factor was the later neoclassical architecture, particularly that of William Henry Playfair, and the National Monument.

William Henry Playfair

William PlayfairW. H. PlayfairPlayfair
It was designed during 1823-6 by Charles Robert Cockerell and William Henry Playfair and is modelled upon the Parthenon in Athens.
1824 in collaboration with Charles Robert Cockerell, designed an exact replica of the Parthenon which was to be built on top of Calton Hill as the National Monument, Edinburgh. However, due to lack of investment it was never finished and became known as Edinburgh's Disgrace.

Charles Robert Cockerell

C. R. CockerellCharles CockerellC.R. Cockerell
It was designed during 1823-6 by Charles Robert Cockerell and William Henry Playfair and is modelled upon the Parthenon in Athens.
1824–29 – The National Monument, Edinburgh, with William Henry Playfair, unfinished.

Parthenon

Parthenon of Athensthe Parthenontemple of Athena
It was designed during 1823-6 by Charles Robert Cockerell and William Henry Playfair and is modelled upon the Parthenon in Athens.
National Monument of Scotland, Edinburgh

Sculpture in Scotland

Scottish
The troubled National Monument of Scotland in Edinburgh, remained controversial and failed to gain a consensus on its design.

Unfinished building

unfinishedIncompleteunfinished motorway
National Monument, Edinburgh, Scotland

1822 in Scotland

1822
July – the Royal Association of Contributors to the National Monument of Scotland is incorporated; the foundation stone is laid in Edinburgh on 27 August.

Robert Forrest (sculptor)

Robert Forrest
On Calton Hill in Edinburgh, he built a hall next to the National Monument of Scotland in 1832, where he exhibited equestrian statues of the Duke of Wellington, the Duke of Marlborough, Queen Mary, Lord Herries and the conversion of St Paul, together with Robert Burns, "Robert the Bruce and the Monk".

1829 in architecture

1829
Construction of the National Monument of Scotland in Edinburgh, designed by Charles Robert Cockerell and William Henry Playfair, is abandoned due to funds being exhausted, leaving only a row of Doric columns supporting the entablature.

1829 in Scotland

1829
Construction of the National Monument of Scotland in Edinburgh, designed by Charles Robert Cockerell and William Henry Playfair, is abandoned due to funds being exhausted, leaving only a row of Doric columns supporting the entablature.

1826 in Scotland

1826
Construction of the National Monument, Edinburgh on Calton Hill (to the dead of the Napoleonic Wars) is commenced; it will never be completed.

National monument

National Monument.Historical Monument and National Heritage
The National Monument of Scotland (Edinburgh)

Architecture of Scotland in the Industrial Revolution

The controversy over the style of the Scottish National Monument in 1816 led to the labelling of Greek temple motifs as "pagan" and relatively few columnar Greek churches were built after that in the capital.

1826 in the United Kingdom

1826
Construction of the National Monument, Edinburgh on Calton Hill (to the dead of the Napoleonic Wars) is commenced; it will never be completed.

Church architecture in Scotland

churchesecclesiastical architecture
The controversy over the style of the Scottish National Monument in 1816 led to the labelling of Greek temple motifs as "pagan" and relatively few columnar Greek churches were built after that in the capital.

Michael Linning

A second significant title that Linning held was Secretary of the Royal Association of Contributors to the National Monument of Scotland.

Dugald Stewart Monument

monument
Playfair also designed the nearby National Monument of Scotland (with Charles Robert Cockerell) and was also responsible for the thoroughfare that encircles Calton Hill on three sides, comprising Royal Terrace, Carlton Terrace and Regent Terrace

Folly

folliesarchitectural follygarden folly
National Monument, Edinburgh

Etymology of Edinburgh

Athens of the North
Also a contributing factor was the later neoclassical architecture, particularly that of William Henry Playfair, and the National Monument.

Liff, Angus

Liff
A second son, called James after his father (born 1755) became 'Scotland's most austere neoclassical architect'. He in turn was the father of William Henry Playfair (born 1790), Scotland's 'greatest exponent of neoclassical architecture', responsible for designing parts of the New Town of Edinburgh and some of the city's most prominent public buildings including the Scottish National Gallery, Royal Scottish Academy, Old College in the University of Edinburgh, Calton Hill Observatory, National Monument of Scotland, and the Royal College of Surgeons.

Where the Hell is Matt?

Where the Hell is Matt
11) National Monument of Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland