A report on National Republican Party

Political party in the United States that evolved from a faction of the Democratic-Republican Party that supported John Quincy Adams in the 1824 presidential election.

- National Republican Party

15 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Clay photographed in 1848

Henry Clay

10 links

American attorney and statesman who represented Kentucky in both the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives.

American attorney and statesman who represented Kentucky in both the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives.

Clay photographed in 1848
Henry Clay and Lucretia
View of Henry Clay's law office (1803–1810), Lexington, Kentucky
Portrait by Matthew Harris Jouett, 1818
Clay helped Adams win the 1825 contingent House election after Clay failed to finish among the three electoral vote-winners. States in orange voted for Crawford, states in green for Adams, and states in blue for Jackson.
Portrait of Henry Clay
Clay supported construction of the National Road, which extended west from Cumberland, Maryland.
Henry Clay, circa 1832
Andrew Jackson defeated Clay in the 1832 election
Clay (brown) won the backing of several state delegations on the first ballot of the 1839 Whig National Convention, but William Henry Harrison ultimately won the party's presidential nomination.
James K. Polk defeated Clay in the 1844 election.
Clay (brown) won the backing of numerous delegates on the first ballot of the 1848 Whig National Convention, but Zachary Taylor ultimately won the party's presidential nomination.
Henry Clay Jr., who died serving in the Mexican–American War
Henry Clay monument and mausoleum, Lexington Cemetery
Clay's estate, Ashland, in Lexington, Kentucky

He helped found both the National Republican Party and the Whig Party.

Adams c. 1843–48, photographed by
Mathew Brady

John Quincy Adams

8 links

American statesman, diplomat, lawyer, and diarist who served as the sixth president of the United States, from 1825 to 1829.

American statesman, diplomat, lawyer, and diarist who served as the sixth president of the United States, from 1825 to 1829.

Adams c. 1843–48, photographed by
Mathew Brady
Adams's birthplace in Quincy, Massachusetts
1815 US passport issued by John Quincy Adams at London.
Adams portrait – Gilbert Stuart, 1818
Painting of John Quincy Adams by Thomas Sully, 1824
In the Adams–Onís Treaty, the United States acquired Florida and set the western border of the 1803 Louisiana Purchase.
1824 presidential election results
General Andrew Jackson, Adams's opponent in the 1824 and 1828 United States presidential elections
Painting of Quincy Adams by Charles Osgood, 1828
Quincy Adams appointed Henry Clay as Secretary of State
1828 presidential election results
Daguerreotype of Quincy Adams by Philip Haas, 1843
Portrait of Quincy Adams by William Hudson, 1844
John Quincy Adams, c. 1840s, Unknown author
BEP engraved portrait of Adams as president
Adams's portrait at the U.S. National Portrait Gallery by George Bingham c. 1850 copy of an 1844 original
Adams's cenotaph at the Congressional Cemetery
John Quincy Adams's original tomb at Hancock Cemetery, across the street from United First Parish Church
Presidential Dollar of John Quincy Adams
Official portrait of Adams by George Peter Alexander Healy, c. 1858
Peacefield - John Quincy Adam's Home
Tombs of Presidents John Adams (far left) and John Quincy Adams (right) and their wives Abigail and Louisa, in a family crypt beneath the United First Parish Church.

During Adams's presidency, the Democratic-Republican Party split into two major camps: the National Republican Party, which supported President Adams, and Andrew Jackson's Democratic Party.

John Quincy Adams, the 6th president, became a Whig congressman later in his career.

Whig Party (United States)

10 links

Political party that espoused traditionalist conservatism in the United States during the middle of the 19th century.

Political party that espoused traditionalist conservatism in the United States during the middle of the 19th century.

John Quincy Adams, the 6th president, became a Whig congressman later in his career.
Henry Clay, a founder of the Whig Party in the 1830s and its 1844 presidential nominee
Daniel Webster, a leading Whig from New England
William Henry Harrison, a two-time presidential candidate who became the first Whig president in 1841 but died just one month into office
William Henry Harrison defeated Martin Van Buren in the 1840 presidential election, thereby becoming the first Whig president
President John Tyler clashed with congressional Whigs and was expelled from the party.
Zachary Taylor served in the Mexican-American War and later won the 1848 presidential election as the Whig nominee.
The United States settled the Texas-Mexico border and acquired portions of seven current states in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. Portions of present-day Arizona and New Mexico were later acquired in the 1853 Gadsden Purchase.
A political cartoon satirizing the candidacy of either Zachary Taylor or Winfield Scott in the 1848 presidential election
Millard Fillmore, the last Whig president
Gen. Winfield Scott, the unsuccessful Whig candidate in the 1852 presidential election
Whig journalist Horace Greeley
John J. Crittenden, an influential Whig leader who later established the short-lived Constitutional Union Party to contest the election of 1860
U.S. presidential election results from 1828 to 1852. Darker shades of blue indicate states that generally voted for the Democratic Party, while darker shades of yellow/brown indicate states that generally voted for the Whig or National Republican Party.
Charles Sumner, an anti-slavery "Conscience Whig" who later joined the Republican Party
Edward Everett, a pro-South "Cotton Whig"
Abraham Lincoln, a former Whig congressman, won the 1860 presidential election on the Republican ticket.
John Marshall Harlan, who began his career as a Whig officeholder, served on the Supreme Court from 1877 to 1911.

The Whigs emerged in the 1830s in opposition to President Andrew Jackson, pulling together former members of the National Republican Party, the Anti-Masonic Party, and disaffected Democrats.

Democratic-Republican Party

8 links

American political party founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in the early 1790s that championed republicanism, agrarianism, political equality, and expansionism.

American political party founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in the early 1790s that championed republicanism, agrarianism, political equality, and expansionism.

Thomas Jefferson defeated John Adams in the 1800 presidential election, thereby becoming the first Democratic-Republican president.
The Louisiana Purchase in 1803 totaled 827,987 sqmi, doubling the size of the United States.
Albert Gallatin served as Secretary of the Treasury under Presidents Jefferson and Madison.
James Monroe, the third Democratic-Republican president
Four Democratic-Republicans sought the presidency in 1824: Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, William H. Crawford, and Henry Clay.
John Quincy Adams won the 1824 presidential election as a Democratic-Republican after leaving the Federalist Party earlier in his career.
Presidential election results from 1796 to 1824. Darker shades of green indicate that the state generally supported the Democratic-Republicans, and darker shades of brown indicate that the state generally supported the Federalists.
John Randolph of Roanoke was a prominent member of a group of Southern plantation owners known as the Old Republicans.
Andrew Jackson led a faction of Democratic-Republicans that ultimately coalesced into the Democratic Party.

Jackson's faction eventually coalesced into the Democratic Party, while supporters of Adams became known as the National Republican Party, which itself later merged into the Whig Party.

Portrait by Ralph Eleaser Whiteside Earl, c. undefined 1835

Andrew Jackson

10 links

American lawyer, general, and statesman who served as the seventh president of the United States from 1829 to 1837.

American lawyer, general, and statesman who served as the seventh president of the United States from 1829 to 1837.

Portrait by Ralph Eleaser Whiteside Earl, c. undefined 1835
Young Jackson Refusing to Clean Major Coffin's Boots (1876 lithograph)
Notice of reward offered by Jackson for return of an enslaved man
General Andrew Jackson as pictured in Harper's Magazine, Vol 28, "War with the Creek Indians", page 605, 1864
In the Treaty of Fort Jackson, the Muscogee surrendered large parts of present-day Alabama and Georgia.
General Andrew Jackson by John Wesley Jarvis, c. undefined 1819
The Battle of New Orleans. General Andrew Jackson stands on the parapet of his defenses as his troops repulse attacking Highlanders, by painter Edward Percy Moran in 1910.
Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans, painted by Thomas Sully in 1845 from an earlier portrait he had completed from life in 1824
Trial of Robert Ambrister during the Seminole War. Ambrister was one of two British subjects executed by General Jackson. (1848)
Teracotta bust of General Jackson by William Rush, 1819
Jackson in 1824, painted by Thomas Sully
1828 election results
President Andrew Jackson
New York: Ritchie & Co. (1860)
Jackson's Indian Removal Act and subsequent treaties resulted in the forced removal of the major tribes of the Southeast from their traditional territories, many along the Trail of Tears.
Portrait of Jackson by Earl, 1830
William C. Rives, Jackson's Minister to France, successfully negotiated a reparations treaty with France in 1831.
1832 election results
1833 Democratic cartoon shows Jackson destroying the "Devil's Bank"
Richard Lawrence's attempt on Jackson's life, as depicted in an 1835 etching
USS Porpoise (1836), a brig ship laid down in 1835 and launched in May 1836; used in the U.S. Exploring Expedition
A New York newspaper blamed the Panic of 1837 on Andrew Jackson, depicted in spectacles and top hat.
Mezzotint after a Daguerreotype of Jackson by Mathew Brady, April 15, 1845
Tennessee Gentleman, portrait of Jackson, c. 1831, from the collection of The Hermitage
Andrew Jackson as Grand Master of Tennessee, 1822
Equestrian statue of Jackson, Jackson County Courthouse, Kansas City, Missouri, commissioned by Judge Harry S. Truman
Jackson portrait on obverse $20 bill
2-cent red stamp
2-cent green stamp
The tomb of Andrew and Rachel Jackson located at The Hermitage

The election marked the definitive end of the one-party Era of Good Feelings, as Jackson's supporters coalesced into the Democratic Party and Adams's followers became known as the National Republicans.

1828 United States presidential election

6 links

The 11th quadrennial presidential election.

The 11th quadrennial presidential election.

"Some account of the bloody deeds of General Andrew Jackson", c. 1828
Results by county explicitly indicating the percentage of the winning candidate in each county. Shades of blue are for Jackson (Democrat) and shades of yellow are for Adams (National Republican).
650px
1829 caricature by Robert Cruikshank of US President Andrew Jackson's inauguration

It featured a repetition of the 1824 election, as President John Quincy Adams of the National Republican Party faced Andrew Jackson of the Democratic Party.

William Morgan, whose disappearance and probable death led to creation of the Anti-Masonic Party

Anti-Masonic Party

7 links

The earliest third party in the United States.

The earliest third party in the United States.

William Morgan, whose disappearance and probable death led to creation of the Anti-Masonic Party
Thurlow Weed, newspaper editor who helped form the Anti-Masonic Party
Solomon Southwick, newspaper publisher and 1828 Anti-Masonic candidate for Governor of New York
Former Mason William Wirt won Vermont's Electoral College votes in the 1832 presidential election for the Anti-Masonic Party
Amos Ellmaker, 1832 Anti-Masonic candidate for Vice President
Jonathan Blanchard, 1884 presidential candidate of the Anti-Masonic Party's second incarnation
Grattan H. Wheeler, Anti-Masonic congressman from New York
President Millard Fillmore's political career began as an Anti-Masonic member of the New York State Assembly in 1829

The Anti-Masons emerged as an important third-party alternative to Andrew Jackson's Democrats and Adams' National Republicans.

Daniel Webster

7 links

American lawyer and statesman who represented New Hampshire and Massachusetts in the U.S. Congress and served as the U.S. Secretary of State under Presidents William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Millard Fillmore.

American lawyer and statesman who represented New Hampshire and Massachusetts in the U.S. Congress and served as the U.S. Secretary of State under Presidents William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Millard Fillmore.

Coat of Arms of Daniel Webster
New Hampshire historical marker (number 91) at his birthplace in present-day Franklin, New Hampshire
Daniel Webster's home in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. The home has since been restored and is now part of the Strawbery Banke museum complex.
Daniel Webster represented the Second Bank of the United States both in the Congress and before the US Supreme Court as well serving as Director of its Boston branch on which he made out this $3,001.01 draft on July 24, 1824.
1834 portrait by Francis Alexander
Portion of painting, Webster's Reply to Hayne by George P.A. Healy
1836 electoral vote results
Through the Webster–Ashburton Treaty, Webster helped bring an end to a boundary dispute in Maine
Portrait of Daniel Webster commissioned by the Senate in 1955
Daniel Webster
Webster (red) won the support of several delegates at the 1852 Whig National Convention
Grace Fletcher
Colonel Fletcher Webster
Daniel Webster monument, Central Park, New York City, from the base: "Liberty and Union, Now and Forever, One and Inseparable"
Webster Hall, at Dartmouth College, houses the Rauner Special Collections Library, which holds some of Webster's personal belongings and writings, including his beaver fur top hat and silk socks.
1890 postage stamp honoring Webster

During his life, he was a member of the Federalist Party, the National Republican Party, and the Whig Party.

1832 United States presidential election

5 links

The 12th quadrennial presidential election, held from November 2 to December 5, 1832.

The 12th quadrennial presidential election, held from November 2 to December 5, 1832.

"King Andrew the First", an Anti-Jacksonian poster shows Andrew Jackson as a monarch trampling the Constitution, the federal judiciary, and the Bank of the United States
Results by county explicitly indicating the percentage of the winning candidate in each county. Shades of blue are for Jackson/Van Buren (Democratic), shades of orange are for Clay (National Republican), shades of red are for Wirt (Anti-Masonic), and shades of green are for Jackson/Barbour (Democratic).
650px

Incumbent president Andrew Jackson, candidate of the Democratic Party, defeated Henry Clay, candidate of the National Republican Party.

Popular votes to political parties during presidential elections.

Political parties in the United States

4 links

American electoral politics have been dominated by two major political parties since shortly after the founding of the republic.

American electoral politics have been dominated by two major political parties since shortly after the founding of the republic.

Popular votes to political parties during presidential elections.
Political parties derivation. Dotted line means unofficially.

Two major parties dominated the political landscape: the Whig Party, led by Henry Clay, that grew from the National Republican Party; and the Democratic Party, led by Andrew Jackson.