Native American tribes in Virginia

tribeVirginia IndianVirginia IndiansVirginiaVirginian Indianshistorical and contemporary Native American life in VirginiaIndiansNative AmericanNative American tribe in VirginiaNative American tribes
The Native American tribes in Virginia are the indigenous tribes who currently live or have historically lived in what is now the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States of America.wikipedia
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Virginia

VACommonwealth of VirginiaVa.
The Native American tribes in Virginia are the indigenous tribes who currently live or have historically lived in what is now the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States of America.
The area's history begins with several indigenous groups, including the Powhatan.

Mattaponi

Mattaponi ReservationMattaponi tribesame name
Only two of the tribes, the Pamunkey and Mattaponi, have retained reservation lands assigned by colonial treaties with the English colonists made in the 17th century.
The Mattaponi tribe is one of only two Virginia Indian tribes in the Commonwealth of Virginia that owns reservation land, which it has held since the colonial era.

Jamestown, Virginia

JamestownJamestown ColonyJamestown Settlement
The first European explorers in what is now Virginia were Spaniards, who landed at two separate places several decades before the English founded Jamestown.
Perhaps the most favorable fact about the location was that it was not inhabited by nearby Virginia Indian tribes, who regarded the site as too poor and remote for agriculture.

Ajacán Mission

a settlementgroup of Spanish JesuitsMartyrs of Virginia
About ten years later, Don Luis returned with missionaries to establish the short-lived Ajacán Mission.
The Ajacán Mission (also Axaca, Axacam, Iacan, Jacán, Xacan) was a Spanish attempt in 1570 to establish a Jesuit mission in the vicinity of the Virginia Peninsula to bring Christianity to the Virginia Indians.

Powhatan

Powhatan ConfederacyPowhatan paramountcyalliance
About 30 Algonquian tribes were allied in the powerful Powhatan paramount chiefdom along the coast, which was estimated to include 15,000 people at the time of English colonization.
The Powhatan people (sometimes Powhatans; also spelled Powatan) are an Indigenous group traditionally from Virginia.

Powhatan (Native American leader)

Chief PowhatanPowhatanher father
All paid tribute to a paramount chief (mamanatowick) Powhatan, whose personal name was Wahunsenecawh.
Powhatan (c. 1547 – c. 1618), whose proper name was Wahunsenacawh (alternately spelled Wahunsenacah, Wahunsunacock or Wahunsonacock), was the paramount chief of Tsenacommacah, an alliance of Algonquian-speaking Virginia Indians in the Tidewater region of Virginia at the time English settlers landed at Jamestown in 1607.

Tsenacommacah

Powhatan tribe
It spanned 100 by 100 mi, and covered most of the tidewater Virginia area and parts of the Eastern Shore, an area they called Tsenacommacah.
The Powhatan were part of a powerful Chiefdom of Virginia Indian tribes, also known as the Powhatan Confederacy, that spoke an Algonquian language.

Pocahontas

Princess PocahontasdaughterLady Rebecca
In April 1613, Captain Samuel Argall learned that Powhatan's "favorite" daughter Pocahontas was residing in the Patawomeck village.
undefined 1596 – March 1617) was a Native American woman notable for her association with the colonial settlement at Jamestown, Virginia.

Appomattoc

ApamatuckAppamattuck
All the land between the Blackwater and York rivers, and up to the navigable point of each of the major rivers - which were connected by a straight line running directly from modern Franklin on the Blackwater, northwesterly to the Appomattoc village beside Fort Henry, and continuing in the same direction to the Monocan village above the falls of the James, where Fort Charles was built, then turning sharp right, to Fort Royal on the York (Pamunkey) river.
The Appomattoc (also spelled Appamatuck, Apamatic, and numerous other variants) were a historic tribe of Virginia Indians speaking an Algonquian language, and residing along the lower Appomattox River, in the area of what is now Petersburg, Colonial Heights, Chesterfield and Dinwiddie Counties in present-day southeast Virginia.

Opchanacanough

OpechancanoughChief OpechancanoughChief ''Opechancanough
His succession was brief and the chiefdom passed to Opechancanough.
Over a period of years, through negotiation and/or coercion, Chief Powhatan united more than 30 of the Virginia Indian tribal groups in the Tidewater region of what is now the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States, essentially the southeastern portion of the state.

Anglo-Powhatan Wars

First Anglo-Powhatan WarAnglo-Powhatan WarPowhatan wars
Their competition for land and resources led to the First Anglo-Powhatan War.
Captain John Smith, a colonial leader, imagined that someday the Virginia Indians would be doing all the work for the English, but Powhatan envisioned something different: he wanted Smith and the colonists to forsake the swamp and instead live in one of his satellite towns called Capahosick where they would make metal tools for him in exchange for full provision.

Rappahannock people

RappahannockRappahannock IndianRappahannock Native Americans
The Ani-Stohini/Unami first petitioned in 1968 and the Rappahannock filed shortly thereafter.
The Rappahannock are one of the eleven state-recognized Native American tribes in Virginia.

Colony of Virginia

Virginiacolonial VirginiaVirginia Colony
When the English first established the Virginia Colony, the Powhatan tribes had a combined population of about 15,000.
As the English expanded out from Jamestown, encroachment of the new arrivals and their ever-growing numbers on what had been Indian lands resulted in several conflicts with the Virginia Indians.

Necotowance

Opechancanough's successor, Necotowance signed his people's first treaty with the English in October 1646.
Necotowance (c. Unknown birth year - died before 1655) was the Werowance of the Powhatan Confederacy and(chief) of the Wyanoak tribe from 1646 until his death before 1655 when his son, Totopotomoi signed an agreement with the de la Warr's in 1655.

Nottoway people

NottowayCheroenhaka (Nottoway) TribeNatoway
The Iroquoian-speaking peoples of the Nottoway and Meherrin lived in what is now Southside Virginia south of the James River.
The Nottoway (Nottoway) are a Native American tribe in Virginia.

Chickahominy people

ChickahominyChickahominy Indian tribeChickahominy Tribe, Virginia
Below the fall line, related Algonquian groups, who were not tributary to Powhatan, included the Chickahominy and the Doeg in Northern Virginia.
The Chickahominy are a Federally recognized tribe of Virginian Indians who primarily live in Charles City County, located along the James River midway between Richmond and Williamsburg in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Racial Integrity Act of 1924

Racial Integrity Act1924 Racial Integrity Actanti-miscegenation laws
From the 1920s, state officials arbitrarily changed vital records of birth and marriage while implementing the Racial Integrity Act of 1924; they removed identification as Indian and reclassified people as either white or non-white (i.e. colored), according to the state's "one-drop rule" (most members of Virginia tribes are multiracial, including European and/or African ancestry), without regard for how people identified.
Gov. E. Lee Trinkle, a year after signing the act, asked Plecker to ease up on the Indians and not "embarrass them any more than possible."

Walter Plecker

They were opposed by Walter Ashby Plecker, the head of the Bureau of Vital Statistics in Virginia (1912–1946).
Plecker refused to recognize the fact that many mixed-race Virginia Indians had maintained their culture and identity as Native Americans over the centuries despite economic assimilation.

Monacan people

MonacanMonocanMonacan Indian Nation
As of January 29, 2018, Virginia has seven federally recognized tribe s, the Pamunkey Indian Tribe, Chickahominy, Eastern Chickahominy, Upper Mattaponi, Rappahannock, Nansemond and Monacan.
Other tribes recognized by the state include the Chickahominy, Eastern Chickahominy, Mattaponi, Nansemond, Pamunkey, Rappahannock, Upper Mattaponi, Patawomeck, Nottoway, and Cheroenhaka (Nottoway) tribes.

Virginia Department of Education

Virginia Education SecretaryVirginia Secretary of EducationVirginia state curriculum
In 2013, the Virginia Department of Education released a 25-minute video, "The Virginia Indians: Meet the Tribes," covering both historical and contemporary Native American life in the state.
In 2013, the Virginia Department of Education released a 25-minute video, "The Virginia Indians: Meet the Tribes," covering both historical and contemporary Native American life in Virginia.

Native Americans in the United States

Native AmericanNative AmericansAmerican Indian
The Native American tribes in Virginia are the indigenous tribes who currently live or have historically lived in what is now the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States of America.

United States

American🇺🇸U.S.
The Native American tribes in Virginia are the indigenous tribes who currently live or have historically lived in what is now the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States of America.

Indigenous peoples

indigenousindigenous peopleaboriginal
Indigenous peoples have occupied the region for at least 12,000 years.

Algonquian languages

AlgonquianAlgonquian languageAlgonquin
At contact, Virginian tribes spoke languages belonging to three major language families: roughly, Algonquian along the coast, Iroquoian in the southern Tidewater region, and Siouan above the Fall Line.

Iroquoian languages

IroquoianIroquoisIroquoian language
At contact, Virginian tribes spoke languages belonging to three major language families: roughly, Algonquian along the coast, Iroquoian in the southern Tidewater region, and Siouan above the Fall Line.