Naval Air Station South Weymouth

NAS South WeymouthSouth Weymouth Naval Air StationSouth Weymouth NASSouth Weymouth, MANaval Air StationSouth WeymouthSouth Weymouth, Massachusetts
Naval Air Station South Weymouth, was an operational United States Navy airfield from 1942 to 1997 in South Weymouth, Massachusetts.wikipedia
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Lajes Field

LajesLajes Air BaseAzores
The two K-ships then flew approximately 22 hours to Lagens Field on Terceira Island in the Azores.
The USN sent six Goodyear-built K-ships from Naval Air Station South Weymouth in Massachusetts to their first stopover base at Naval Station Argentia, Newfoundland and then on to Lajes Field in the Azores before flying to their final destination at Port Lyautey (Kenitra), French Morocco.

Naval Station Argentia

NS ArgentiaArgentiaNAS Argentia
United States Navy K-ships (blimps) K-123 and K-130 from Blimp Squadron 14 (also known as ZP-14, Blimpron 14, or "The Africa Squadron") left South Weymouth on 28 May 1944 and landed at Argentia, Newfoundland about 16 hours later.
Blimps K-123 and K-130 from USN Blimp Squadron 14 (also known as ZP-14, Blimpron 14, or "The Africa Squadron") left South Weymouth Naval Air Station in Massachusetts on 28 May 1944 and landed at Argentia about 16 hours later.

Weymouth, Massachusetts

WeymouthSouth WeymouthEast Weymouth
Naval Air Station South Weymouth, was an operational United States Navy airfield from 1942 to 1997 in South Weymouth, Massachusetts.
A portion of the former South Weymouth Naval Air Station was located in Weymouth, which was closed in 1996 under the Base Realignment and Closure Act.

Hangar

aircraft hangarhangar deckhangars
In its original as-built format South Weymouth's main facilities consisted of two gigantic blimp hangars, the earlier (LTA Hangar One or "The Big Hangar") of steel construction and the second (LTA Hangar Two) of the more common World War II standardized design of nearly all-wooden construction employed to conserve rationed metals.
Bases with wooden hangars included: the Naval Air Stations at South Weymouth, Massachusetts (1 hangar); Lakehurst, New Jersey (2); Weeksville, North Carolina (1); Glynco, Georgia (2); Richmond, Florida (3); Houma, Louisiana (1); Hitchcock, Texas (1); Tustin (Santa Ana), California (2); Moffett Field, California (2) and Tillamook, Oregon (2).

VP-92

VP-92 (1970-2007)
VP-92, which flew P-3 Orions and VR-62, which flew C-130 Hercules transports, went to Brunswick NAS before the base was officially deactivated and closed by order of the 1995 BRAC.
1 November 1970: VP-92 was established at NAS South Weymouth, Massachusetts, as a naval air reserve land-based patrol squadron flying 12 Lockheed SP-2H Neptunes. The new squadron came under the operational and administrative control of Commander Naval Air Reserve Force and Commander Fleet Air Reserve Wings, Atlantic. VP-92 was established as a result of a major reorganization of Naval Air Reserve that took place in mid-1970. Under the Reserve Force Squadron concept 12 land-based naval reserve patrol squadrons were formed and structured along the lines of regular Navy squadrons with nearly identical organization and manning levels. The 12/2/1 concept had 12 VP squadrons under two commands, COMFAIRESWINGLANT and COMFAIRESWINGPAC. These two commands came under the control of one central authority, Commander Naval Air Reserve.

Naval Air Station Squantum

NAS SquantumSquantum Naval Air Stationformer U.S. Navy Airfield
In 1950 the Navy decided to close Squantum Naval Air Station, traditionally the focus of Navy and Marine Corps reserve aviation training in New England, and move the reserve program to ALF South Weymouth.
Operations were moved to the nearby NAS South Weymouth.

N-class blimp

ZPG-2surveillance patrol blimpZPG
The NADU operated a diverse aircraft fleet that included (among other things) Lockheed WV-2 Warning Stars, Douglas F4D Skyrays, Douglas F3D Skyknights, Lockheed P2V Neptunes, and the ZPG-2W, which were the world's largest blimps.
The airship departed Naval Air Station South Weymouth, Massachusetts, on Monday 4 March 1957, reaching the south-west tip of Portugal by the evening of 7 March despite adverse headwinds for some of the way, passed by Casablanca, Morocco, on the morning of 8 March, then turned back westwards over the Cape Verde Islands towards the Caribbean, eventually landing at Naval Air Station Key West, Florida, on the evening of 15 March.

VMA-322

VMF-322 (1953–1958) "The Cannon Balls”
The squadron, also known as the “Fighting Gamecocks”, fought in World War II and later became a part of the Marine Forces Reserve based out of Naval Air Station South Weymouth, Massachusetts.

Base Realignment and Closure

BRACBase Realignment and Closure Commission2005 Base Realignment and Closure Commission
The 1991 Base Realignment and Closure Commission decided to close the base in its recommendations.
Naval Air Station South Weymouth

South Weymouth station

South WeymouthSouth Weymouth MBTA station
The development is adjacent to the South Weymouth station on the Old Colony Lines of the MBTA Commuter Rail.
It serves the Plymouth/Kingston Line, and is located on the west side of the former South Weymouth Naval Air Station in the South Weymouth village.

Rockland, Massachusetts

RocklandRockland, MA
During the twentieth century, the town was the site of a portion of the landing strips of the South Weymouth Naval Air Station.

VA-210 (U.S. Navy)

VA-210
VA-210 (1970–1971) "The Blackhawks"
Utilizing assets from reserve squadron VA-2Z1 attack squadron VA-210 was established at the NAS South Weymouth, Massachusetts on 1 July 1970.

Naval Air Station Brunswick

NAS BrunswickBrunswickBrunswick Naval Air Station
VP-92, which flew P-3 Orions and VR-62, which flew C-130 Hercules transports, went to Brunswick NAS before the base was officially deactivated and closed by order of the 1995 BRAC.
South Weymouth Naval Air Station, closed in 1996

Marine Air Support Squadron 6

MACS-21MASS-6MATCU-73
MGCIS-21 (1953–1954) Marine Ground Controlled Intercept Squadron
The squadron was reactivated on 18 January 1952 and in December 1953 moved to Naval Air Station South Weymouth.

Abington, Massachusetts

AbingtonAbington Public LibraryNorth Abington, Massachusetts
The northeast corner of town is also the site of portions of the runways of the South Weymouth Naval Air Station, which was closed in 1997 as a part of the fourth round of BRAC base closures.

Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron 49

MALS-49
MALS-49
During 1988 detachments were established at Andrews Air Force Base, Washington DC and Naval Air Station South Weymouth, Massachusetts.

VMA-217

VMF-217 (1953–1958) "Max's Wild Hares”
VMF-217 was briefly reactivated from 1953 to 1964 in the Marine Forces Reserve, flying the A-4 Skyhawk at Naval Air Station South Weymouth, Massachusetts.

United States Navy

U.S. NavyNavyUS Navy
Naval Air Station South Weymouth, was an operational United States Navy airfield from 1942 to 1997 in South Weymouth, Massachusetts.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
It was first established as a regular Navy blimp base during World War II.

Blimp

non-rigid airshipblimpsnon-rigid
During World War II the base's primary mission was to provide support for anti-submarine blimp operations.

Macadam

macadamizedmacadam roadtelfordized
The base also had a 2000 ft Macadamized blimp landing mat, six mooring circles, and a 4500 ft cinder-surfaced turf runway.

Runway

runwayslanding striprunway lighting
The base also had a 2000 ft Macadamized blimp landing mat, six mooring circles, and a 4500 ft cinder-surfaced turf runway.

Kenitra Air Base

Craw FieldPort LyauteyKenitra
The last leg of the flight was a ~20-hour flight to their destination with Fleet Air Wing (FAW) 15 at Port Lyautey, French Morocco (now Kenitra, Morocco).

Kenitra

Port LyauteyNAS Port LyauteyPort-Lyautey
The last leg of the flight was a ~20-hour flight to their destination with Fleet Air Wing (FAW) 15 at Port Lyautey, French Morocco (now Kenitra, Morocco).

Lockheed EC-121 Warning Star

EC-121Lockheed WV-2 Warning StarEC-121 Warning Star
The NADU operated a diverse aircraft fleet that included (among other things) Lockheed WV-2 Warning Stars, Douglas F4D Skyrays, Douglas F3D Skyknights, Lockheed P2V Neptunes, and the ZPG-2W, which were the world's largest blimps.