Nave

navessingle-navesanctuarythree-navenaoscentral naveDescription of the term "navemain bodymain body of the churchnaved
The nave is the central part of a church, stretching from the (normally western) main entrance or rear wall, to the transepts, or in a church without transepts, to the chancel.wikipedia
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Transept

transeptsNorth Transeptsemitransept
The nave is the central part of a church, stretching from the (normally western) main entrance or rear wall, to the transepts, or in a church without transepts, to the chancel.
In churches, a transept is an area set crosswise to the nave in a cruciform ("cross-shaped") building within the Romanesque and Gothic Christian church architectural traditions.

Church architecture

churchecclesiastical architecturechurches
The nave is the central part of a church, stretching from the (normally western) main entrance or rear wall, to the transepts, or in a church without transepts, to the chancel.
Christian architecture was made to correspond to civic and imperial forms, and so the Basilica, a large rectangular meeting hall became general in east and west, as the model for churches, with a nave and aisles and sometimes galleries and clerestories.

Basilica

basilicasminor basilicabasilican
When a church contains side aisles, as in a basilica-type building, the strict definition of the term "nave" is restricted to the central aisle.
It continues to be used in an architectural sense to describe rectangular buildings with a central nave and aisles, and usually a raised platform at the opposite end from the door.

Chancel

presbyterychancel archsanctuary
The nave is the central part of a church, stretching from the (normally western) main entrance or rear wall, to the transepts, or in a church without transepts, to the chancel.
It is generally the area used by the clergy and choir during worship, while the congregation is in the nave.

Arcade (architecture)

arcadearcadesarcaded
The nave extends from the entry—which may have a separate vestibule (the narthex)—to the chancel and may be flanked by lower side-aisles separated from the nave by an arcade.
In the Gothic architectural tradition, the arcade can be located in the interior, in the lowest part of the wall of the nave, supporting the triforium and the clerestory in a cathedral, or on the exterior, in which they are usually part of the walkways that surround the courtyard and cloisters.

Narthex

exonarthexesonarthexexonartheces
The nave extends from the entry—which may have a separate vestibule (the narthex)—to the chancel and may be flanked by lower side-aisles separated from the nave by an arcade.
The narthex is an architectural element typical of early Christian and Byzantine basilicas and churches consisting of the entrance or lobby area, located at the west end of the nave, opposite the church's main altar.

Rood screen

rood loftchancel screenchoir screen
In medieval churches the nave was separated from the chancel by the rood screen; these, being elaborately decorated, were notable features in European churches from the 14th to the mid-16th century.
It is typically an ornate partition between the chancel and nave, of more or less open tracery constructed of wood, stone, or wrought iron.

Altar

high altarHoly Tablealtars
It provides the central approach to the high altar.
This was variously interpreted over the years to mean the north side of the front of a fixed communion table, the north end of a fixed table (i.e., facing south), the north side of a free-standing table (presumably facing those intending to receive the Elements who would be sitting in the quire stalls opposite), or at the north end of a free-standing table lengthwise in the chancel, facing a congregation seated in the nave.

St Albans Cathedral

St Albans AbbeySt AlbansAbbey of St Albans
At 85 metres long, it has the longest nave of any cathedral in England.

Aarhus Cathedral

cathedralÅrhus CathedralÅrhus Domkirke
The nave was lengthened to 93 meters, the longest in Denmark.

St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin

St. Patrick's CathedralSt. Patrick's Cathedral, DublinSt Patrick's Cathedral
The tower (Minot's Tower) and west nave were rebuilt between 1362 and 1370, following a fire.

Choir (architecture)

choirchoir stallsquire
It is in the western part of the chancel, between the nave and the sanctuary, which houses the altar and Church tabernacle.

Bourges Cathedral

BourgesCathedral of Bourges Cathedral of Saint Etienne
The choir was in use (though not necessarily complete) by 1214 and the nave was finished by 1255.

St. Peter's Basilica

Saint Peter's BasilicaSt Peter's BasilicaSt. Peter
The basilica is cruciform in shape, with an elongated nave in the Latin cross form but the early designs were for a centrally planned structure and this is still in evidence in the architecture.

Vault (architecture)

vaultvaultedvaults
The term may also have been suggested by the keel shape of the vaulting of a church.
The continuous thrust of the barrel vault in these cases was met either by semicircular or pointed barrel vaults on the aisles, which had only half the span of the nave; of this there is an interesting example in the Chapel of Saint John in the Tower of London - and sometimes by half-barrel vaults.

Old St. Peter's Basilica

St. Peter's BasilicaOld Saint Peter's BasilicaSt. Peter
Old St. Peter's Basilica in Rome is an early church which had this form.
It had long been thought to have been made for the main altar of the church; more recent research suggests that it was placed on the "canon's altar", located in the nave, just to the left of the huge arched opening into the transept.

Cologne Cathedral

cathedralCologneCathedral of Cologne
Some work proceeded intermittently on the structure of the nave between the west front and the eastern arm, but during the 16th century this also stopped.

Seville

Seville, SpainSevillaSevilla, Spain
The interior is the longest nave in Spain, and is lavishly decorated, with a large quantity of gold evident.

Beauvais Cathedral

BeauvaisCathedral of BeauvaisCathédrale Saint-Pierre de Beauvais
A small Romanesque church dating back to the 10th-century, known as the Basse Œuvre, still occupies the site destined for the nave of the Beauvais Cathedral.

Cathedral of St. John the Divine

Cathedral of Saint John the Divine, New YorkCathedral of Saint John the DivineCathedral of St John the Divine
The first stone of the nave was laid, and the west front was undertaken in 1925.

Abbey

abbeysArchabbeynunnery
The nave of the church was on the north boundary of the cloister.

Architecture of cathedrals and great churches

Cathedral architecturecathedralsbasilica
In churches of Western European tradition, the plan is usually longitudinal, in the form of the so-called Latin Cross with a long nave crossed by a transept.

List of highest church naves

highest interior navehighest naves in the worldtenth highest nave in the world

Aisle

aislesside aisleaisled
When a church contains side aisles, as in a basilica-type building, the strict definition of the term "nave" is restricted to the central aisle. The nave extends from the entry—which may have a separate vestibule (the narthex)—to the chancel and may be flanked by lower side-aisles separated from the nave by an arcade.