Nazi Party

NSDAPNazisNaziNational Socialist German Workers' PartyNational Socialist German Workers PartypartyNational SocialistsNational SocialistNational Socialist PartyNSDAP (Nazi Party)
The National Socialist German Workers' Party (, abbreviated NSDAP), commonly referred to in English as the Nazi Party, was a far-right political party in Germany that was active between 1920 and 1945, that created and supported the ideology of National Socialism.wikipedia
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Nazism

NaziNazisNational Socialism
The National Socialist German Workers' Party (, abbreviated NSDAP), commonly referred to in English as the Nazi Party, was a far-right political party in Germany that was active between 1920 and 1945, that created and supported the ideology of National Socialism.
National Socialism (Nationalsozialismus), more commonly known as Nazism, is the ideology and practices associated with the Nazi Party—officially the National Socialist German Workers' Party (Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP)—in Nazi Germany, and of other far-right groups with similar ideas and aims.

Nazism and race

Nazi racial ideologyAryanNazi racial theories
Pseudo-scientific racist theories were central to Nazism, expressed in the idea of a "people's community" (Volksgemeinschaft). They disenfranchised and segregated homosexuals, Africans, Jehovah's Witnesses and political opponents.
Nazism and race concerns the Nazi Party's adoption and further development of several hypotheses concerning their concept of race.

German nationalism

German nationalistGerman nationalistsnationalist
The Nazi Party emerged from the German nationalist, racist and populist Freikorps paramilitary culture, which fought against the communist uprisings in post-World War I Germany.
In the 1930s, the Nazis came to power and sought to create a Greater Germanic Reich, emphasizing ethnic German identity and German greatness to the exclusion of all others, eventually leading to the extermination of Jews, Poles, Romani, and other people deemed Untermenschen (subhumans) in the Holocaust during World War II.

German Workers' Party

Deutsche ArbeiterparteiGerman Workers PartyDAP
Its precursor, the German Workers' Party (Deutsche Arbeiterpartei; DAP), existed from 1919 to 1920.
It was the precursor of the Nazi Party, which was officially known as the National Socialist German Workers' Party (Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei, NSDAP).

Foreign races

foreign raceforeignforeign nations
The party aimed to unite "racially desirable" Germans as national comrades, while excluding those deemed either to be political dissidents, physically or intellectually inferior, or of a foreign race (Fremdvölkische).
Foreign races (German: Fremdvölkische) was a term used during the Nazi era to describe people who were not of "German or related blood" (Nuremberg Laws).

Persecution of homosexuals in Nazi Germany

Persecution of homosexuals in Nazi Germany and the HolocausthomosexualsHistory of gay men in Nazi Germany and the Holocaust
They disenfranchised and segregated homosexuals, Africans, Jehovah's Witnesses and political opponents.
Upon the rise of Adolf Hitler and the National Socialist German Workers Party (the Nazi Party) in Germany, gay men and, to a lesser extent, lesbians, were two of the numerous groups targeted by the Nazis and were ultimately among Holocaust victims.

Nazi Germany

Third ReichGermanGermany
Hitler rapidly established a totalitarian regime known as the Third Reich.
Nazi Germany is the common English name for Germany between 1933 and 1945, when Adolf Hitler and his Nazi Party (NSDAP) controlled the country through a dictatorship.

German-occupied Europe

Occupied EuropeGerman occupationNazi-occupied Europe
Following the defeat of the Third Reich at the conclusion of World War II in Europe, the party was "declared to be illegal" by the Allied powers, who carried out denazification in the years after the war both in Germany and in territories occupied by Nazi forces.
German-occupied Europe refers to the sovereign countries of Europe which were occupied and civil occupied including puppet government by the military forces and the government of Nazi Germany at various times between 1939 and 1945, during and shortly before World War II, generally administered by the Nazi regime.

The Holocaust

HolocaustShoahNazi Holocaust
The persecution reached its climax when the party-controlled German state set in motion the Final Solution–an industrial system of genocide which achieved the murder of around 6 million Jews and millions of other targeted victims, in what has become known as the Holocaust.
Under the coordination of the SS, with directions from the highest leadership of the Nazi Party, killings were committed within Germany itself, throughout occupied Europe, and within territories controlled by Germany's allies.

Denazification

de-NazificationdenazifiedDefunct
Following the defeat of the Third Reich at the conclusion of World War II in Europe, the party was "declared to be illegal" by the Allied powers, who carried out denazification in the years after the war both in Germany and in territories occupied by Nazi forces.
It was carried out by removing those who had been Nazi Party or SS members from positions of power and influence and by disbanding or rendering impotent the organizations associated with Nazism.

Dietrich Eckart

Dietrich EckhartDietrich-Eckart-BühneECKART, Dietrich
Supporter Dietrich Eckart, a well-to-do journalist, brought military figure Felix Graf von Bothmer, a prominent supporter of the concept of "national socialism", to address the movement.
Dietrich Eckart (23 March 1868 – 26 December 1923) was a German journalist, playwright, poet, and politician who was one of the founders of the German Workers' Party, the predecessor to the Nazi Party (NSDAP).

Munich

Munich, GermanyMünchenMunich, West Germany
On 7 March 1918, Anton Drexler, an avid German nationalist, formed a branch of this league in Munich.
In the 1920s, Munich became home to several political factions, among them the NSDAP.

Allies of World War II

AlliedAlliesAllied forces
Following the defeat of the Third Reich at the conclusion of World War II in Europe, the party was "declared to be illegal" by the Allied powers, who carried out denazification in the years after the war both in Germany and in territories occupied by Nazi forces.
By the early 1930s, the Nazi Party led by Adolf Hitler became the dominant revanchist movement in Germany and Hitler and the Nazis gained power in 1933.

Gottfried Feder

FEDER, Gottfried
While attending a party meeting on 12 September 1919, Hitler became involved in a heated argument with a visitor, Professor Baumann, who questioned the soundness of Gottfried Feder's arguments against capitalism; Baumann proposed that Bavaria should break away from Prussia and found a new South German nation with Austria.
Gottfried Feder (27 January 1883 – 24 September 1941) was a German civil engineer, a self-taught economist and one of the early key members of the Nazi Party.

Ernst Röhm

RöhmErnst RohmErnst Julius Röhm
Among the party's earlier members were Ernst Röhm of the Army's District Command VII; Dietrich Eckart, who has been called the spiritual father of National Socialism; then-University of Munich student Rudolf Hess; Freikorps soldier Hans Frank; and Alfred Rosenberg, often credited as the philosopher of the movement.
Ernst Julius Günther Röhm (28 November 1887 – 1 July 1934) was a German military officer and an early member of the Nazi Party.

Alfred Rosenberg

RosenbergAlfred RosenburgAlfred Ernst Rosenberg
Among the party's earlier members were Ernst Röhm of the Army's District Command VII; Dietrich Eckart, who has been called the spiritual father of National Socialism; then-University of Munich student Rudolf Hess; Freikorps soldier Hans Frank; and Alfred Rosenberg, often credited as the philosopher of the movement.
A Baltic German, he was a theorist and an influential ideologue of the Nazi Party.

Thule Society

ThuleThule-GesellschaftThule Gesellschaft
Later in 1918, Karl Harrer (a journalist and member of the Thule Society) convinced Drexler and several others to form the Politischer Arbeiterzirkel (Political Workers' Circle).
The society is notable chiefly as the organization that sponsored the Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (DAP; German Workers' Party), which was later reorganized by Adolf Hitler into the National Socialist German Workers' Party (NSDAP or Nazi Party).

Weimar Republic

GermanyWeimar GermanyWeimar
However, he also accused international capitalism of being a Jewish-dominated movement and denounced capitalists for war profiteering in World War I. Drexler saw the political violence and instability in Germany as the result of the Weimar Republic being out-of-touch with the masses, especially the lower classes.
In 1933, Hindenburg appointed Adolf Hitler as Chancellor with the Nazi Party being part of a coalition government.

National Socialist Program

25-Point ProgramNazi Party Program25 points
It was in this speech that Hitler enunciated the twenty-five points of the German Workers' Party manifesto that had been drawn up by Drexler, Feder and himself.
The National Socialist Program, also known as the 25-point Program or the 25-point Plan (25-Punkte-Programm), was the party program of the National Socialist German Workers' Party (NSDAP).

Hans Frank

FRANKFRANK, HansGovernor-General of occupied Poland
Among the party's earlier members were Ernst Röhm of the Army's District Command VII; Dietrich Eckart, who has been called the spiritual father of National Socialism; then-University of Munich student Rudolf Hess; Freikorps soldier Hans Frank; and Alfred Rosenberg, often credited as the philosopher of the movement.
Frank was an early member of the German Workers' Party, the precursor of the Nazi Party (NSDAP).

Anton Drexler

DREXLER, Anton
On 7 March 1918, Anton Drexler, an avid German nationalist, formed a branch of this league in Munich.
Anton Drexler (13 June 1884 – 24 February 1942) was a German far-right political leader of the 1920s who founded the pan-German and anti-Semitic German Workers' Party (DAP), the antecedent of the Nazi Party (NSDAP).

Volksgemeinschaft

national communityan organic harmony between landowner and peasantclass collaborators
Pseudo-scientific racist theories were central to Nazism, expressed in the idea of a "people's community" (Volksgemeinschaft).
It was adopted by the Nazi Party to justify actions against Jews, profiteers, Marxists, and the Allies of World War I, whom the Nazis accused of obstructing German national regeneration, causing national disintegration in 1918 and Germany's defeat in World War I.

Karl Harrer

HARRER, Karl
Later in 1918, Karl Harrer (a journalist and member of the Thule Society) convinced Drexler and several others to form the Politischer Arbeiterzirkel (Political Workers' Circle).
Karl Harrer (8 October 1890 – 5 September 1926) was a German journalist and politician, one of the founding members of the Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (German Workers' Party, DAP) in January 1919, the predecessor to the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (National Socialist German Workers' Party – NSDAP), more commonly known as the Nazi Party.

Hitler Youth

HitlerjugendHitler JugendHitler-Jugend
The Hitler Youth was formed for the children of party members.
The Hitler Youth (Hitlerjugend, often abbreviated as HJ) was the youth organisation of the Nazi Party in Germany.

Hermann Esser

ESSER, Hermann
Hitler continued to face some opposition within the NSDAP, as his opponents had Hermann Esser expelled from the party and they printed 3,000 copies of a pamphlet attacking Hitler as a traitor to the party.
Hermann Esser (29 July 1900 – 7 February 1981) was an early member of the Nazi Party (NSDAP).