NeXT Computer

NeXTNeXT Computer SystemNeXT Inc.NeXT workstation
NeXT Computer (also called the NeXT Computer System) is a workstation computer that was developed, marketed, and sold by NeXT Inc.wikipedia
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NeXT Introduction

launch event
The NeXT Computer was launched in October 1988 at a lavish invitation-only event, "NeXT Introduction – the Introduction to the NeXT Generation of Computers for Education" at the Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall in San Francisco, California.
The NeXT Introduction sub-titled "the Introduction to the NeXT Generation of Computers for Education " was a lavish, invitation-only gala launch event for The NeXT Computer (also called the NeXT Computer System) was described as a multimedia extravaganza.

NeXTSTEP

NeXTNeXT DPSNeXTStep 1.0
Its NeXTSTEP operating system is based on the Mach and BSD-derived Unix, with a proprietary GUI using a Display PostScript-based back end.
A preview release of NeXTSTEP (version 0.8) was shown with the launch of the NeXT Computer on October 12, 1988.

Tim Berners-Lee

Sir Tim Berners-LeeTim Berners LeeTimothy Berners-Lee
A NeXT Computer and its object oriented development tools and libraries were used by Tim Berners-Lee and Robert Cailliau at CERN to develop the world's first web server (CERN httpd) and web browser (WorldWideWeb).
He was honoured as the "Inventor of the World Wide Web" during the 2012 Summer Olympics opening ceremony, in which he appeared in person, working with a vintage NeXT Computer at the London Olympic Stadium.

Motorola 68881

6888268881Motorola 68882
It was designed around the Motorola 68030 CPU and 68882 floating-point coprocessor, with a clock speed of 25 MHz.
The 68881 or 68882 were used in the Sun Microsystems Sun-3 workstations, IBM RT PC workstations, Apple Computer Macintosh II family, NeXT Computer, Sharp X68000, Amiga 3000, and Atari Mega STE, TT, and Falcon030.

WorldWideWeb

webfirst Web browserNexus (web browser)
A NeXT Computer and its object oriented development tools and libraries were used by Tim Berners-Lee and Robert Cailliau at CERN to develop the world's first web server (CERN httpd) and web browser (WorldWideWeb).
Some of the code still resides on Tim Berners-Lee's NeXT Computer in the CERN museum and has not been recovered due to the computer's status as a historical artifact.

CERN httpd

CERN's httpdW3C httpd
A NeXT Computer and its object oriented development tools and libraries were used by Tim Berners-Lee and Robert Cailliau at CERN to develop the world's first web server (CERN httpd) and web browser (WorldWideWeb).
CERN httpd was originally developed on a NeXT Computer running NeXTSTEP, and was later ported to other Unix-like operating systems, OpenVMS and systems with unix emulation layers, e.g. OS/2 with emx+gcc.

NeXT

NeXT ComputerNeXT Inc.NeXT Software
NeXT introduced the first NeXT Computer in 1988, and the smaller NeXTstation in 1990.

NeXTcube

Cube
It superseded the original NeXT Computer workstation and is housed in a similar cube-shaped magnesium enclosure.

Previous (software)

Previous
Previous (literally the antonym of next) is an open source emulator of the proprietary 68k-based NeXT computer system family, aiming at emulating the original 68030-based NeXT Computer and the 68040-based NeXTstation and NeXTcube computers.

NeXTstation

later machinesstation
The NeXT Computer was succeeded by the NeXTStation, an upgraded model in 1990.
The NeXTstation originally shipped with a NeXT MegaPixel 17" monitor (with built-in speakers), keyboard, and mouse. It is nicknamed "the slab", since the pizza box form factor contrasts quite sharply with the original NeXT Computer's basic shape (otherwise known as "the cube").

Electronic AppWrapper

The NeXT platform was used by Jesse Tayler at Paget Press to develop the first electronic app store, the Electronic AppWrapper in the early 1990s.
The AppWrapper was a combination of both a catalog and magazine, which listed the vast majority of software products available for the NeXT Computer.

Motorola 56000

Motorola 5600156001Motorola 56002
The 56k series was quite popular for a time in a number of computers, including the NeXT, Atari Falcon030 and SGI Indigo workstations all using the 56001.

Motorola

Motorola, Inc.Motorola Inc.Motorola Semiconductor
It was designed around the Motorola 68030 CPU and 68882 floating-point coprocessor, with a clock speed of 25 MHz.

Central processing unit

CPUprocessorprocessors
It was designed around the Motorola 68030 CPU and 68882 floating-point coprocessor, with a clock speed of 25 MHz.

Floating-point arithmetic

floating pointfloating-pointfloating-point number
It was designed around the Motorola 68030 CPU and 68882 floating-point coprocessor, with a clock speed of 25 MHz.

Coprocessor

co-processorcoprocessorsmath co-processor
It was designed around the Motorola 68030 CPU and 68882 floating-point coprocessor, with a clock speed of 25 MHz.

Mach (kernel)

MachMach kernelMach microkernel
Its NeXTSTEP operating system is based on the Mach and BSD-derived Unix, with a proprietary GUI using a Display PostScript-based back end.

Berkeley Software Distribution

BSDBSD Unix*BSD
Its NeXTSTEP operating system is based on the Mach and BSD-derived Unix, with a proprietary GUI using a Display PostScript-based back end.

Unix

UNIX operating systemAT&T UnixUnix-like
Its NeXTSTEP operating system is based on the Mach and BSD-derived Unix, with a proprietary GUI using a Display PostScript-based back end.

Display PostScript

DisplayPostscriptDPS
Its NeXTSTEP operating system is based on the Mach and BSD-derived Unix, with a proprietary GUI using a Display PostScript-based back end.

Die casting

die-castdie castdie-casting
The enclosure consists of a 1-foot (305 mm) die-cast magnesium cube-shaped black case, which led to the machine being informally referred to as "The Cube".

Magnesium

MgMg 2+ Mg2+
The enclosure consists of a 1-foot (305 mm) die-cast magnesium cube-shaped black case, which led to the machine being informally referred to as "The Cube".

Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall

Davies Symphony HallDavies HallDavies Auditorium
The NeXT Computer was launched in October 1988 at a lavish invitation-only event, "NeXT Introduction – the Introduction to the NeXT Generation of Computers for Education" at the Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall in San Francisco, California.

San Francisco

San Francisco, CaliforniaSan Francisco, CACity and County of San Francisco
The NeXT Computer was launched in October 1988 at a lavish invitation-only event, "NeXT Introduction – the Introduction to the NeXT Generation of Computers for Education" at the Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall in San Francisco, California.