A report on NeXT Computer and WorldWideWeb

This NeXTcube was used by Tim Berners-Lee as the first server on the World Wide Web.
WorldWideWeb, c. undefined 1994
WorldWideWeb, c. undefined 1994

Some of the code still resides on Tim Berners-Lee's NeXT Computer in the CERN museum and has not been recovered due to the computer's status as a historical artifact.

- WorldWideWeb

A NeXT Computer and its object-oriented development tools and libraries were used by Tim Berners-Lee and Robert Cailliau at CERN to develop the world's first web server (CERN httpd) and web browser (WorldWideWeb).

- NeXT Computer
This NeXTcube was used by Tim Berners-Lee as the first server on the World Wide Web.

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Berners-Lee in 2014

Tim Berners-Lee

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English computer scientist best known as the inventor of the World Wide Web.

English computer scientist best known as the inventor of the World Wide Web.

Berners-Lee in 2014
Berners-Lee, 2005
This NeXT Computer was used by Berners-Lee at CERN and became the world's first web server
Tim Berners-Lee at the Home Office, London, on 11 March 2010
Berners-Lee speaking at the launch of the World Wide Web Foundation
Berners-Lee's tweet, "This is for everyone", at the 2012 Summer Olympic Games in London
Tim Berners-Lee at the Science Museum for the Web@30 event, March 2019

He was honoured as the "Inventor of the World Wide Web" during the 2012 Summer Olympics opening ceremony in which he appeared working with a vintage NeXT Computer.

His software also functioned as an editor (called WorldWideWeb, running on the NeXTSTEP operating system), and the first Web server, CERN HTTPd (short for Hypertext Transfer Protocol daemon).