Neil Gorsuch Supreme Court nomination

nominatednominatesnominationnomination of Neil Gorsuch54–45confirmedGorsuch was confirmed by the SenateJudge Gorsuch's nomination to serve on the Supreme Courregaining a ninth JusticeSupreme Court confirmation
On January 31, 2017, soon after taking office, President Donald Trump, a Republican, nominated Neil Gorsuch for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to succeed Antonin Scalia, who had died almost one year earlier.wikipedia
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Neil Gorsuch

GorsuchNeil M. GorsuchJustice Neil Gorsuch
On January 31, 2017, soon after taking office, President Donald Trump, a Republican, nominated Neil Gorsuch for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to succeed Antonin Scalia, who had died almost one year earlier.
He was nominated by Donald Trump to succeed Antonin Scalia and took the oath of office on April 10, 2017.

Merrick Garland Supreme Court nomination

nominatednominationMerrick Garland
The Senate Judiciary Committee refused to consider the Garland nomination, thus keeping the vacancy open through the end of Obama's presidency on January 20, 2017.
Obama's successor, Donald Trump (a Republican), nominated Judge Neil Gorsuch to fill the vacancy on January 31, 2017, soon after taking office.

Donald Trump Supreme Court candidates

appointing justiceslist of potential Supreme Court justiceslists of potential nominees
During the 2016 presidential campaign, while Garland remained before the Senate, Trump released two lists of potential nominees.
After taking office, he nominated Neil Gorsuch to succeed Scalia, and Gorsuch was confirmed in April 2017.

Presidency of Barack Obama

Obama administrationBarack Obama administrationadministration
The Senate Judiciary Committee refused to consider the Garland nomination, thus keeping the vacancy open through the end of Obama's presidency on January 20, 2017.
President Donald Trump later nominated Neil Gorsuch to Scalia's former seat on the Supreme Court, and Gorsuch was confirmed by the Senate in April 2017.

Supreme Court of the United States

United States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme CourtSupreme Court
On January 31, 2017, soon after taking office, President Donald Trump, a Republican, nominated Neil Gorsuch for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to succeed Antonin Scalia, who had died almost one year earlier.

Donald Trump

TrumpPresident TrumpPresident Donald Trump
On January 31, 2017, soon after taking office, President Donald Trump, a Republican, nominated Neil Gorsuch for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to succeed Antonin Scalia, who had died almost one year earlier.
On January 31, Trump nominated U.S. Appeals Court judge Neil Gorsuch to fill the seat on the Supreme Court previously held by Justice Antonin Scalia until his death on February 13, 2016.

Presidency of George W. Bush

Bush administrationGeorge W. Bush administrationadministration
In preparation for the hearing, the committee requested the Department of Justice (DOJ) to send all documents they had regarding Gorsuch's work in the George W. Bush administration; and by the time the hearing commenced, the DOJ had sent the committee over 144,000 pages of documents and, according to a White House spokesman, more than 220,000 pages of documents altogether.
Bush appointed Neil Gorsuch to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit in 2006; Gorsuch would later be nominated by President Donald Trump for a seat on the Supreme Court.

Washington v. Trump

State of Washington v. TrumplawsuitState of Washington and State of Minnesota v. Trump
Democrat Patrick Leahy used his time to praise Judge Garland, criticize those policies of President George W. Bush that Gorsuch had defended at the Justice Department, and to ask Gorsuch how he would rule in Washington v. Trump.
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said that the President showed "a disdain for an independent judiciary that doesn't always bend to his wishes and a continued lack of respect for the Constitution, making it more important that the Supreme Court serve as an independent check on the administration. With each action testing the Constitution, and each personal attack on a judge, President Trump raises the bar even higher for Judge Gorsuch's nomination to serve on the Supreme Court. His ability to be an independent check will be front and center throughout the confirmation process."

Nuclear option

change the rulesConstitutional optioneliminated rules allowing filibusters on executive branch nominations
However, Republicans invoked the "nuclear option", eliminating the filibuster with respect to Supreme Court nominees.
This was after Senate Democrats filibustered the nomination of Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court of the United States, after the Senate Republicans had previously refused to take up Merrick Garland's nomination by President Obama in 2016.

Filibuster in the United States Senate

filibusterSenate filibusterfilibustered
Democratic Senators launched a filibuster against Gorsuch's nomination, hoping to block his confirmation.

First 100 days of Donald Trump's presidency

first 100 days100th day in office100th day of his presidency
On the evening of January 30, Trump announced his nomination of U.S. Appeals Court judge Neil Gorsuch for the Supreme Court fulfilling his campaign pledge that he would choose someone 'in the mold' of the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

Inauguration of Donald Trump

inaugurationTrump's inaugurationDonald Trump's inauguration
On January 31, 2017, soon after taking office, President Donald Trump, a Republican, nominated Neil Gorsuch for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to succeed Antonin Scalia, who had died almost one year earlier.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
On January 31, 2017, soon after taking office, President Donald Trump, a Republican, nominated Neil Gorsuch for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to succeed Antonin Scalia, who had died almost one year earlier.

Republican Party (United States)

RepublicanRepublican PartyR
On January 31, 2017, soon after taking office, President Donald Trump, a Republican, nominated Neil Gorsuch for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to succeed Antonin Scalia, who had died almost one year earlier.

Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States

Associate JusticeJusticeAssociate Justice of the Supreme Court
On January 31, 2017, soon after taking office, President Donald Trump, a Republican, nominated Neil Gorsuch for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to succeed Antonin Scalia, who had died almost one year earlier.

Antonin Scalia

Justice ScaliaScaliaJustice Antonin Scalia
On January 31, 2017, soon after taking office, President Donald Trump, a Republican, nominated Neil Gorsuch for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to succeed Antonin Scalia, who had died almost one year earlier.

Barack Obama

ObamaPresident ObamaPresident Barack Obama
Then-president Barack Obama, a Democrat, nominated Merrick Garland to succeed Scalia on March 16, 2016, but the nomination was stonewalled by the Republican-controlled U.S. Senate.

Democratic Party (United States)

DemocraticDemocratDemocratic Party
Then-president Barack Obama, a Democrat, nominated Merrick Garland to succeed Scalia on March 16, 2016, but the nomination was stonewalled by the Republican-controlled U.S. Senate.

Merrick Garland

Merrick B. GarlandGarland JChief Judge Merrick Garland
Then-president Barack Obama, a Democrat, nominated Merrick Garland to succeed Scalia on March 16, 2016, but the nomination was stonewalled by the Republican-controlled U.S. Senate.

United States Senate

U.S. SenatorUnited States SenatorU.S. Senate
Then-president Barack Obama, a Democrat, nominated Merrick Garland to succeed Scalia on March 16, 2016, but the nomination was stonewalled by the Republican-controlled U.S. Senate.

Party leaders of the United States Senate

Senate Majority LeaderMajority LeaderSenate Minority Leader
Majority leader Mitch McConnell declared that as the presidential election cycle had already commenced, making the appointment of the next justice a political issue to be decided by voters.

Mitch McConnell

Senator Mitch McConnellMinority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnel
Majority leader Mitch McConnell declared that as the presidential election cycle had already commenced, making the appointment of the next justice a political issue to be decided by voters.

United States presidential election

presidential electionpresidential electionsU.S. presidential election
Majority leader Mitch McConnell declared that as the presidential election cycle had already commenced, making the appointment of the next justice a political issue to be decided by voters.

United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary

Senate Judiciary CommitteeJudiciaryJudiciary Committee
The Senate Judiciary Committee refused to consider the Garland nomination, thus keeping the vacancy open through the end of Obama's presidency on January 20, 2017.