Nemo me impune lacessit

Nemo me impune lacessetone possible source
Nemo me impune lacessit was the Latin motto of the Royal Stuart dynasty of Scotland from at least the reign of James VI when it appeared on the reverse side of merk coins minted in 1578 and 1580.wikipedia
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Order of the Thistle

KTKnight of the ThistleThe Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle
It is the adopted motto of the Order of the Thistle and of three Scottish regiments of the British Army. The motto of the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, the Scottish chivalrous order, is also that of the British Army regiments The Royal Regiment of Scotland, Scots Guards and Royal Scots Dragoon Guards.
The motto is Nemo me impune lacessit (Latin for "No one provokes me with impunity").

Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom

Royal Armsroyal coat of armsRoyal Arms of the United Kingdom
The motto also appears, in conjunction with the collar of the Order of the Thistle, in later versions of the Royal coat of arms of the Kingdom of Scotland and subsequently in the version of the Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom used in Scotland.
The coat also features both the motto Nemo me impune lacessit (No one wounds (touches) me with impunity) and, surrounding the shield, the collar of the Order of the Thistle.

Royal Arms of Scotland

Scotlandfor Scotlandroyal coat of arms of Scotland
The motto also appears, in conjunction with the collar of the Order of the Thistle, in later versions of the Royal coat of arms of the Kingdom of Scotland and subsequently in the version of the Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom used in Scotland.
The motto of the Order of the Thistle, Nemo me impune lacessit, appears on a blue scroll overlying the compartment.

Little Jock Elliot

he had been seriously wounded
The phrase "Wha daur meddle wi' me?" also appears in a traditional border ballad entitled "Little Jock Elliot", which recalls the exploits of a 16th-century Border Reiver ("John Elliot of the Park"), with particular reference to an infamous encounter in the summer of 1566 with James Hepburn, 4th Earl of Bothwell, the third husband of Mary, Queen of Scots.
The ballad asserts Elliot's prowess in battle and contains the famous refrain "My name is Little Jock Elliot, and wha daur meddle wi' me!," which has traditionally been offered as one possible source for the origins of the Latin motto of the Order of the Thistle, "Nemo me impune lacessit".

The Cask of Amontillado

Fortunatoamontilladocask he found in a walled-up room in the basement of a villa
It is also referenced in the Edgar Allan Poe story "The Cask of Amontillado" (Poe was adopted by a Scottish merchant), and in Stanislaw Lem's Fiasco.
During their walk, Montresor mentions his family coat of arms: a golden foot in a blue background crushing a snake whose fangs are embedded in the foot's heel, with the motto Nemo me impune lacessit ("No one attacks me with impunity").

Royal Company of Archers

Queen's Body Guard for ScotlandThe Royal Company of ArchersCaptain of the Queen's Bodyguard of Scotland
The motto is also that of the Royal Company of Archers and has been displayed upon the unit's second standard since 1713, following the grant of a Royal charter by Queen Anne.
The other standard displays on one side, on a field or, a lion rampant gules, encircled with a double tressure flory-counter flory of the second (the Royal Arms of Scotland); on the top, a thistle and crown, motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (no one provokes me with impunity).

Bawbee

bawbie
The motto (with the verb in the Future Tense [lacesset]: "Nemo Me Impune Lacesset") appears as a reverse inscription on the Scottish "Bawbee" (6 pence) coin of King Charles II surrounding a crowned thistle.
The issue of King Charles II was a coin of copper with the famed reverse inscription Nemo me impune lacessit ("No one provokes me with impunity"), although the last word on these coins was spelled "Lacesset".

In My Defens God Me Defend

In Defens
(In Defens being an abbreviated form of the full motto In My Defens God Me Defend). Nemo me impune lacessit is displayed prominently above the Gatehouse entrance added to Edinburgh Castle in 1888.
The motto of the Order of the Thistle, Nemo me impune lacessit, appears on a blue scroll overlying the compartment.

Royal Scots Greys

2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys)2nd DragoonsScots Greys
It was also the motto of several former units of the British Army, including the Royal Scots, Royal Scots Greys, Royal Highland Fusiliers and Black Watch, some of which went on to be amalgamated to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland in 2006.
Their official motto, however, was that of the Order of the Thistle; Nemo Me Impune Lacessit (No one provokes me with impunity).

Thistle

thistlesthistle-headthistle-down
According to legend, the "guardian thistle" (see Scotch thistle) played a vital part in Alexander III, King of Scots' defence of the ancient realm of Scotland against a night-time raiding party of Norwegian Vikings, prior to the Battle of Largs (1263): one or more raiders let out a yell of pain when stepping on a prickly thistle, thus alerting the Scots.
The Duke's motto was "Qui s'y frotte s'y pique", meaning "who touches it, pricks oneself", with a similar idea to the Scottish motto "Nemo me impune lacessit". Nowadays the thistle is still the official symbol of the city of Nancy, as well as the emblem of the AS Nancy football team, and the Lorraine Regional Natural Park.

Edinburgh Castle

EdinburghCastleScottish National War Memorial
(In Defens being an abbreviated form of the full motto In My Defens God Me Defend). Nemo me impune lacessit is displayed prominently above the Gatehouse entrance added to Edinburgh Castle in 1888.
Statues of Robert the Bruce by Thomas Clapperton and William Wallace by Alexander Carrick were added in 1929, and the Latin motto Nemo me impune lacessit is inscribed above the gate.

The Dartmouth Review

Dartmouth Review
Nemo me impune lacessit is the motto of Dartmouth College's independent conservative newspaper, The Dartmouth Review.
On the first or second page, a letter from the editor-in-chief appears next to the masthead and below a slogan borrowed from the Scottish Highlanders: nemo me impune lacessit (no one threatens me with impunity). The remainder of each issue contains articles written by regular staffers and the occasional guest contributor.

Nancy, France

NancyNancy, LorraineFrance
The French city of Nancy has a similar motto, Non inultus premor ("I cannot be touched unavenged"), also a reference to the thistle, which is the symbol of the region of Lorraine.
The motto has a similar meaning to the Scottish one, "Nemo me impune lacessit", usually translated as "No one attacks me with impunity", which also makes reference to the thistle.

Royal Scots Dragoon Guards

The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers and Greys)Royal Scots Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers and Greys)The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards
The motto of the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, the Scottish chivalrous order, is also that of the British Army regiments The Royal Regiment of Scotland, Scots Guards and Royal Scots Dragoon Guards.

Scots Guards

3rd Regiment of Foot GuardsScots Fusilier Guards3rd Foot Guards
The motto of the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, the Scottish chivalrous order, is also that of the British Army regiments The Royal Regiment of Scotland, Scots Guards and Royal Scots Dragoon Guards.

Royal Scots

1st Foot1st Regiment of FootThe Royal Scots
It was also the motto of several former units of the British Army, including the Royal Scots, Royal Scots Greys, Royal Highland Fusiliers and Black Watch, some of which went on to be amalgamated to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland in 2006.

Black Watch

Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment)Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)The Black Watch
It was also the motto of several former units of the British Army, including the Royal Scots, Royal Scots Greys, Royal Highland Fusiliers and Black Watch, some of which went on to be amalgamated to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland in 2006.

The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada

Black WatchBlack Watch regimentThe Black Watch
The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada, a reserve infantry regiment of the Canadian Forces, also bears this motto.

Cape Town Highlanders Regiment

Cape Town HighlandersThe Cape Town HighlandersQueen's Own Cape Town Highlanders
The motto is also that of the Cape Town Highlanders Regiment, a reserve mechanised infantry unit of South African Army.

1st Battalion, 24th Marines

1st Battalion 24th Marines1st Battalion
The 1st Battalion, 24th Marines of the United States Marine Corps uses the phrase as its motto.

1st Squadron (Belgium)

1ère Escadrille de Chasse1st Squadron1 Squadron
In Belgium, the 1st Squadron (Belgium) of the Belgian Air Force bears the motto.

Timber rattlesnake

canebrake rattlesnaketimber rattlesnakescanebrake
The motto also appears (with the verb in the Future Tense: Nemo Me Impune Lacesset) above an American timber rattlesnake on a 1778 $20 bill from Georgia as an early example of the colonial use of the coiled rattlesnake symbol, which later became famous on the Gadsden flag.
The motto Nemo me impune lacesset (with the verb in the future tense) appears above a C. horridus on a 1778 $20 bill from Georgia as an early example of the colonial use of the coiled rattlesnake symbol, which later became famous on the Gadsden flag.

Knights of Cardone

Knights of Cardone
The motto "Nemo me impune lacessit" is Latin which translates to "No one provokes me with impunity".

9 Squadron (Belgium)

9ème Escadrille de Chasse9th Squadron9ème Escadrille
9ème Escadrille also inherited the "Thistle" symbol and motto “Nemo me impune lacessit” or “No-one can challenge me unpunished”.