Neptune (mythology)

NeptuneKing NeptuneNeptunusNeptune EquesterNettunoRoman god of the seaNeptūnusparedrae'' of NeptuneFather Neptunegod of freshwater and the sea
Neptune (Neptūnus ) is the god of freshwater and the sea in Roman religion.wikipedia
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Poseidon

NeptuneAegaeusNeptune Equester
He is the counterpart of the Greek god Poseidon.
His Roman equivalent is Neptune.

Jupiter (mythology)

JupiterJoveJupiter Optimus Maximus
In the Greek-influenced tradition, Neptune is the brother of Jupiter and Pluto; the brothers preside over the realms of Heaven, the earthly world, and the Underworld. In this respect he was the equivalent of Mars, Janus, Saturn and even Jupiter among Latin tribes.
In the Greek-influenced tradition, Jupiter was the brother of Neptune and Pluto, the Roman equivalents of Poseidon and Hades respectively.

Salacia

Pluto (mythology)

PlutoPloutongod of the underworld
In the Greek-influenced tradition, Neptune is the brother of Jupiter and Pluto; the brothers preside over the realms of Heaven, the earthly world, and the Underworld.
Natale Conti cites Pausanias in noting that keys are an attribute of Pluto as the scepter is of Jove (Greek Zeus) and the trident of Neptune (Poseidon).

Aeneid

The AeneidÆneidAEneis
Messapus led the Falisci and others to war in the Aeneid. Servius in his commentary to the Aeneid also writes about Salacia and Venilia in various passages, e.g. V 724: "(Venus) dicitur et Salacia, quae proprie meretricum dea appellata est a veteribus": "(Venus) is also called Salacia, who was particularly named goddess of prostitutes by the ancient".
Neptune takes notice: although he himself is no friend of the Trojans, he is infuriated by Juno's intrusion into his domain, and stills the winds and calms the waters, after making sure that the winds would not bother the Trojans again, lest they be punished more harshly than they were this time.

List of water deities

sea goddessriver godsea god
Neptune (Neptūnus ) is the god of freshwater and the sea in Roman religion.

Saturn (mythology)

SaturnSaturnusSaturnian
In this respect he was the equivalent of Mars, Janus, Saturn and even Jupiter among Latin tribes.
Saturn's consort was his sister Ops, with whom he fathered Jupiter, Neptune, Pluto, Juno, Ceres and Vesta.

Nechtan (mythology)

NechtanNechtain
He proposed an etymology that brings together Neptunus with Vedic and Avestan theonyms Apam Napat, Apam Napá and Old Irish theonym Nechtan, all meaning descendant of the waters.
According to Georges Dumézil the name Nechtan is perhaps cognate with that of the Romano-British god Nodens or the Roman god called Neptunus, and the Persian and Vedic gods sharing the name Apam Napat.

Neptunalia

The Neptunalia was the festival of Neptune on July 23, at the height of summer.
The Neptunalia was an obscure archaic two-day festival in honor of Neptune as god of waters, celebrated at Rome in the heat and drought of summer, probably 23 July (Varro, De lingua Latina vi.19).

Messapus

The district was traditionally connected to the cult of the god: Messapus and Halesus, the eponymous hero of Falerii, were believed to be his own sons.
He was a famous tamer of horses and king of Etruria, known for being one "whom no one can fell by fire or steel" (Mandelbaum, VII.911-912); perhaps because he is a son of Neptune.

Mars (mythology)

MarsMars UltorMars the Avenger
In this respect he was the equivalent of Mars, Janus, Saturn and even Jupiter among Latin tribes.
The spear is the instrument of Mars in the same way that Jupiter wields the lightning bolt, Neptune the trident, and Saturn the scythe or sickle.

Interpretatio graeca

interpretatio romanaidentified withidentified
In the Greek-influenced tradition, Neptune is the brother of Jupiter and Pluto; the brothers preside over the realms of Heaven, the earthly world, and the Underworld.

Roman festivals

festivalfestivalsRoman festival
The Neptunalia was the festival of Neptune on July 23, at the height of summer.

Venus (mythology)

VenusVenus VictrixVenus Erycina
Servius in his commentary to the Aeneid also writes about Salacia and Venilia in various passages, e.g. V 724: "(Venus) dicitur et Salacia, quae proprie meretricum dea appellata est a veteribus": "(Venus) is also called Salacia, who was particularly named goddess of prostitutes by the ancient".
In Vergil's poetic account of Octavian's victory at the sea-battle of Actium, the future emperor is allied with Venus, Neptune and Minerva.

Lucaria

The most ancient Roman calendar set the feriae of Neptunus on July 23, two days after the Lucaria of July 19 and 21 and two days before the Furrinalia of July 25.
Neptune embodied fresh as well as salt water among the Romans, and the collocation of festivals in July, including also the Furrinalia on the 25th, may express concerns for drought.

Trident

tridentsforkgig
The trident is the weapon of Poseidon, or Neptune, the God of the Sea in classical mythology.

Venilia

In the view of Dumézil, Neptune's two paredrae Salacia and Venilia represent the overpowering and the tranquil aspects of water, both natural and domesticated: Salacia would impersonate the gushing, overbearing waters and Venilia the still or quietly flowing waters.
She and Salacia are the paredrae of Neptune.

Vesta (mythology)

Vestagoddess VestaVestal
She was the daughter of Saturn and Ops, and sister of Jupiter, Neptune, Pluto, Juno, and Ceres.

Circus Maximus

Circo MassimoCircusRome
On the other hand, Roman god Consus was associated with horses: his underground altar was located in the valley of the Circus Maximus at the foot of the Palatine, the place of horse races.
The position of Consus' shrine at the turn of the track recalls the placing of shrines to Roman Neptune's Greek equivalent, Poseidon, in Greek hippodromes.

Hippocampus (mythology)

hippocampHippocampusseapony
In Hellenistic and Roman imagery, however, Poseidon (or Roman Neptune) often drives a sea-chariot drawn by hippocampi.

Nethuns

neθ[uns]
Nethuns is the Etruscan name of the god.
In this case, Etruscan may have borrowed the Umbrian name *Nehtuns, (Roman Neptune, who was originally a god of water).

Consualia

festivalfestival and games
On the day of his summer festival (August 21), the Consualia aestiva, it was customary to bring horses and mules in procession crowned with flowers and then hold equine races in the Circus.
According to Livy, the festival honors Neptune.

Liver of Piacenza

Piacenza Livermodel of a liver
His name is to be found on two cases of the Piacenza Liver, namely case 7 on the outer rim and case 28 on the gall-bladder, (plus once in case 22 along with Tinia).

Ceres (mythology)

Ceresthe Roman goddess of agriculturegoddess Ceres
According to another tradition related by a Caesius, also based on the same source, the Etruscan Penates would be Fortuna, Ceres, Genius Iovialis and Pales, this last one being the male Etruscan god (ministrum Iovis et vilicum, domestic and peasant of Jupiter).
According to interpretatio romana, by which Roman deities were identified with their Greek counterparts, she was an equivalent to Demeter, one of the Twelve Olympians of Greek religion and mythology; this made Ceres one of Rome's twelve Di Consentes, daughter of Saturn and Ops, sister of Jupiter, mother of Proserpina by Jupiter and sister of Juno, Vesta, Neptune and Dis.

Flamen Quirinalis

FlaminesQuirinus
On that day the flamen Quirinalis and the vestal virgins sacrificed on the underground altar of Consus.
The Virites, Quirinus's female paredrae, must be the expression of the god's virtus, in the case of Quirinus namely the personification of the individuals composing Roman society as citizens, in the same way as e.g. Nerio, Mars's paredra, must be the personification of military prowess.