NetBSD

BSDCryptographic Device DriverNetBSD FoundationNetBSD kernelNetBSD PPC & x86 NetBSD ProjectNetBSD/i386The NetBSD Foundation
NetBSD is a free and open-source Unix-like operating system based on the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD).wikipedia
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OpenBSD

PuffyOpenCVSPuffy (mascot)
He later founded a new project, OpenBSD, from a forked version of NetBSD 1.0 near the end of 1995.
Theo de Raadt created OpenBSD in 1995 by forking NetBSD.

Theo de Raadt

Theo DeRaadt
The four founders of the NetBSD project, Chris Demetriou, Theo de Raadt, Adam Glass, and Charles Hannum, felt that a more open development model would benefit the project: one centered on portable, clean, correct code.
He is the founder and leader of the OpenBSD and OpenSSH projects, and was also a founding member of NetBSD.

Pkgsrc

In 1998, NetBSD 1.3 introduced the pkgsrc packages collection.
It was forked from the FreeBSD ports collection in 1997 as the primary package management system for NetBSD.

Cross-platform software

Cross-platformPlatform independentmulti-platform
This platform independence aids the development of embedded systems, particularly since NetBSD 1.6, when the entire toolchain of compilers, assemblers, linkers, and other tools fully support cross-compiling.
These machines often run one version of Microsoft Windows, though they can run other operating systems as well, including Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, macOS and FreeBSD.

Free and open-source software

free and open-sourcefree and open source softwareFOSS
NetBSD is a free and open-source Unix-like operating system based on the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD).
FreeBSD and NetBSD (both derived from 386BSD) were released as Free software when the USL v. BSDi lawsuit was settled out of court in 1993.

Linux

GNU/LinuxLinux on the desktopLin
In comparison, Linux device driver code often must be reworked for each new architecture. pkgsrc supports not only NetBSD, but also several other BSD variants like FreeBSD and Darwin/Mac OS X, and other Unix-like operating systems such as Linux, Solaris, IRIX, and others, as well as Interix.
Although not released until 1992, due to legal complications, development of 386BSD, from which NetBSD, OpenBSD and FreeBSD descended, predated that of Linux.

DEC Alpha

AlphaAlpha AXPAlpha processor
This permits a particular device driver for a PCI card to work without modifications, whether it is in a PCI slot on an IA-32, Alpha, PowerPC, SPARC, or other architecture with a PCI bus.
Operating systems that supported Alpha included OpenVMS (previously known as OpenVMS AXP), Tru64 UNIX (previously known as DEC OSF/1 AXP and Digital UNIX), Windows NT (discontinued after NT 4.0; and pre-release Windows 2000 RC1), Linux (Debian, SUSE, Gentoo and Red Hat), BSD UNIX (NetBSD, OpenBSD and FreeBSD up to 6.x), Plan 9 from Bell Labs, as well as the L4Ka::Pistachio kernel.

VAX

DEC VAXVAX 11/780DEC VAX ULTRIX
These range from VAX minicomputers to Pocket PC PDAs.
More recently, NetBSD and OpenBSD have supported various VAX models and some work has been done on porting Linux to the VAX architecture.

Operating system

operating systemsOScomputer operating system
NetBSD is a free and open-source Unix-like operating system based on the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD).
Freely distributed and ported to many minicomputers, it eventually also gained a following for use on PCs, mainly as FreeBSD, NetBSD and OpenBSD.

Cross compiler

cross-compilationcross-compilecross-compiling
This platform independence aids the development of embedded systems, particularly since NetBSD 1.6, when the entire toolchain of compilers, assemblers, linkers, and other tools fully support cross-compiling. The NetBSD cross-compiling framework (also known as "build.sh" ) lets a developer build a complete NetBSD system for an architecture from a more powerful system of different architecture (cross-compiling), including on a different operating system (the framework supports most POSIX-compliant systems).
For instance, NetBSD provides a POSIX Unix shell script named which will first build its own toolchain with the host's compiler; this, in turn, will be used to build the cross-compiler which will be used to build the whole system.

Rump kernel

the NetBSD rump kernel
NetBSD 5.0 introduced the rump kernel, an architecture to run drivers in user-space by emulating kernel-space calls.
The NetBSD rump kernel is the first implementation of the "anykernel" concept where drivers either can be compiled into and/or run in the monolithic kernel or in user space on top of a light-weight kernel.

Embedded system

embedded systemsembeddedembedded device
This platform independence aids the development of embedded systems, particularly since NetBSD 1.6, when the entire toolchain of compilers, assemblers, linkers, and other tools fully support cross-compiling. It continues to be actively developed and is available for many platforms, including servers, desktops, handheld devices, and embedded systems.
They often use DOS, Linux, NetBSD, or an embedded real-time operating system such as MicroC/OS-II, QNX or VxWorks.

Computer Systems Research Group

CSRGCSRG, UC BerkeleyU.C. Berkeley
NetBSD was originally derived from the 4.3BSD-Reno release of the Berkeley Software Distribution from the Computer Systems Research Group of the University of California, Berkeley, via their Net/2 source code release and the 386BSD project.
The group was disbanded in 1995, leaving a significant legacy: FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, and DragonFly BSD are based on the 4.4BSD-Lite distribution and continue to play an important role in the open-source UNIX community today, including dictating the style of C programming used via KNF in the style man page.

Veriexec

Verified Executables
Verified Executables (or Veriexec) is an in-kernel file integrity subsystem in NetBSD.
Veriexec is a file-signing scheme for the NetBSD operating system.

Fork (software development)

forkforkedforks
It was the first open-source BSD descendant officially released after 386BSD was forked.

Bioctl

bio(4)
The bio(4) interface for vendor-agnostic RAID volume management through bioctl has been available in NetBSD since 2007.
The bio(4) pseudo-device driver and the bioctl(8) utility implement a generic RAID volume management interface in OpenBSD and NetBSD.

386BSD

NetBSD was originally derived from the 4.3BSD-Reno release of the Berkeley Software Distribution from the Computer Systems Research Group of the University of California, Berkeley, via their Net/2 source code release and the 386BSD project. It was the first open-source BSD descendant officially released after 386BSD was forked.
Around the same time, the NetBSD project was founded by a different group of 386BSD users, with the aim of unifying 386BSD with other strands of BSD development into one multi-platform system.

Minicomputer

minicomputersmini-computermini
These range from VAX minicomputers to Pocket PC PDAs.
During the 1990s, the change from minicomputers to inexpensive PC networks was cemented by the development of several versions of Unix and Unix-like systems that ran on the Intel x86 microprocessor architecture, including Solaris, Linux, FreeBSD, NetBSD and OpenBSD.

FreeBSD

TrustedBSDFreeBSD kernel*BSD
pkgsrc supports not only NetBSD, but also several other BSD variants like FreeBSD and Darwin/Mac OS X, and other Unix-like operating systems such as Linux, Solaris, IRIX, and others, as well as Interix.
For example, OpenPAM has been adopted by NetBSD.

Hardware abstraction

hardware abstraction layerHALHALs
NetBSD's portability is aided by the use of hardware abstraction layer interfaces for low-level hardware access such as bus input/output or DMA.
The NetBSD operating system is widely known as having a clean hardware abstraction layer which allows it to be highly portable.

PUFFS (NetBSD)

PUFFS
A variety of "foreign" disk filesystem formats are also supported in NetBSD, including FAT, NTFS, Linux ext2fs, Apple HFS and OS X UFS, RISC OS FileCore/ADFS, AmigaOS Fast File System, IRIX EFS, Version 7 Unix File System, and many more through PUFFS.
Pass-to-Userspace Framework File System (puffs) is a NetBSD kernel subsystem developed for running filesystems in userspace.

POSIX

POSIX.1POSIX.2POSIX compatible
The NetBSD cross-compiling framework (also known as "build.sh" ) lets a developer build a complete NetBSD system for an architecture from a more powerful system of different architecture (cross-compiling), including on a different operating system (the framework supports most POSIX-compliant systems).

PowerPC

PPCPower PCPowerPC 2.02
This permits a particular device driver for a PCI card to work without modifications, whether it is in a PCI slot on an IA-32, Alpha, PowerPC, SPARC, or other architecture with a PCI bus.

CHFS

The CHFS Flash memory filesystem was imported into NetBSD in November 2011.
It was the first open source flash memory-specific file system written for the NetBSD operating system.

Berkeley Software Distribution

BSDBSD Unix*BSD
NetBSD is a free and open-source Unix-like operating system based on the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD).
Today, "BSD" often refers to its descendants, such as FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, or DragonFly BSD, and systems based on those descendants.