Neurosis

neuroticneurosespsychoneurosisneurotic disordersneuroticspsychoneuroticneuroticismnervousnessNeurotic disorderanxiety neuroses
Neurosis is a class of functional mental disorders involving chronic distress but neither delusions nor hallucinations.wikipedia
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Neuroticism

neuroticneuroticallyadult neurotic
Neither should it be mistaken for neuroticism, a fundamental personality trait proposed in the Big Five personality traits theory.
People with high neuroticism indexes are at risk for the development and onset of common mental disorders, such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and substance use disorder, symptoms of which had traditionally been called neuroses.

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders

DSM-IVDSM-IV-TRDSM
The term is no longer used by the professional psychiatric community in the United States, having been eliminated from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in 1980 with the publication of DSM III.
The term "reaction" was dropped, but the term "neurosis" was retained.

Big Five personality traits

Five Factor ModelBig Fivefive-factor model of personality
Neither should it be mistaken for neuroticism, a fundamental personality trait proposed in the Big Five personality traits theory.
Neuroticism is similar but not identical to being neurotic in the Freudian sense (i.e., neurosis.) Some psychologists prefer to call neuroticism by the term emotional instability to differentiate it from the term neurotic in a career test.

Carl Jung

JungCarl Gustav JungC. G. Jung
Carl Jung found his approach particularly effective for patients who are well adjusted by social standards but are troubled by existential questions. The meaning of the term was redefined by Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud over the early and middle 20th century.
This event, Jung later recalled, "was when I learned what a neurosis is."

ICD-10 Chapter V: Mental and behavioural disorders

ICD-10Chapter VICD-10 ChICD-10 codes (personality disorders)
It is still used in the [[ICD-10 Chapter V: Mental and behavioural disorders#(F40–F48) Neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders|ICD-10 Chapter V F40–48]].

Major depressive disorder

depressionclinical depressionmajor depression
Neurotic tendencies are common and may manifest themselves as acute or chronic anxiety, depression, an obsessive–compulsive disorder, a phobia, or a personality disorder.
It was a split of the previous depressive neurosis in the DSM-II, which also encompassed the conditions now known as dysthymia and adjustment disorder with depressed mood.

Personality disorder

personality disorderspersonalitycluster A
Neurotic tendencies are common and may manifest themselves as acute or chronic anxiety, depression, an obsessive–compulsive disorder, a phobia, or a personality disorder.
These were often understood as weaknesses of character or willful deviance, and were distinguished from neurosis or psychosis.

Neurosis and Human Growth

Neurosis and Human Growth: The Struggle Toward Self-Realization
In her final book, Neurosis and Human Growth, Karen Horney laid out a complete theory of the origin and dynamics of neurosis.
In it she outlines her theory of neurosis.

Basic anxiety

Growing up with neurotic caretakers, the child quickly becomes insecure and develops basic anxiety.
Horney believed that neurosis resulted from basic anxiety caused by interpersonal relationships.

Psychosis

psychoticpsychosespsychotic break
Neurosis should not be mistaken for psychosis, which refers to a loss of touch with reality.
The word was also used to distinguish a condition considered a disorder of the mind, as opposed to neurosis, which was considered a disorder of the nervous system.

Unconscious mind

unconsciousunconsciouslythe unconscious
Jung found that the unconscious finds expression primarily through an individual's inferior psychological function, whether it is thinking, feeling, sensation, or intuition.
Freud later used his notion of the unconscious in order to explain certain kinds of neurotic behavior.

Karen Horney

HorneyK.HorneyKaren Danielsan
In her final book, Neurosis and Human Growth, Karen Horney laid out a complete theory of the origin and dynamics of neurosis.
It was while living in Brooklyn that Horney developed and advanced her composite theories regarding neurosis and personality, based on experiences gained from working in psychotherapy.

Sigmund Freud

FreudFreudianFreudian theory
The meaning of the term was redefined by Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud over the early and middle 20th century.
Freud postulated the existence of libido, a sexualised energy with which mental processes and structures are invested and which generates erotic attachments, and a death drive, the source of compulsive repetition, hate, aggression and neurotic guilt.

Defence mechanism

defense mechanismdefense mechanismsdefence mechanisms
According to psychoanalytic theory, neuroses may be rooted in ego defense mechanisms, but the two concepts are not synonymous.

Neurotics Anonymous

After achieving sobriety Bill continued to suffer from neurosis, specifically depression.

John Russon

Russon, John
Russon's approach to mental health—in particular his interpretation of neurosis—is specially striking for its bringing together of the theme of embodiment that has been prominent in existential phenomenology with the theme of dialectical self-transformation that is prominent in the philosophy of Hegel and with the theme of the "system" of family life that is prominent in the work of such psychologists and family theorists as Salvador Minuchin, R.D. Laing and D.W. Winnicott.

Analytical psychology

JungianJungian psychologyJungian analyst
"Neurosis" results from a disharmony between the individual's (un)consciousness and his higher Self.

Functional symptom

functionalfunctional weaknessfunctional" limb weakness
Neurosis is a class of functional mental disorders involving chronic distress but neither delusions nor hallucinations.

Mental disorder

mental illnessnervous breakdownmentally ill
Neurosis is a class of functional mental disorders involving chronic distress but neither delusions nor hallucinations.

Distress (medicine)

distressemotional distressdistressed
Neurosis is a class of functional mental disorders involving chronic distress but neither delusions nor hallucinations.

Delusion

delusionsdelusionalparanoid delusions
Neurosis is a class of functional mental disorders involving chronic distress but neither delusions nor hallucinations.

Hallucination

hallucinationshallucinatehallucinating
Neurosis is a class of functional mental disorders involving chronic distress but neither delusions nor hallucinations.

Trait theory

personality traitpersonality traitstraits
Neither should it be mistaken for neuroticism, a fundamental personality trait proposed in the Big Five personality traits theory.

Obsessive–compulsive disorder

obsessive-compulsive disorderobsessive compulsive disorderOCD
Neurotic tendencies are common and may manifest themselves as acute or chronic anxiety, depression, an obsessive–compulsive disorder, a phobia, or a personality disorder. There are many different neuroses: obsessive–compulsive disorder, obsessive–compulsive personality disorder, impulse control disorder, anxiety disorder, hysteria, and a great variety of phobias.

Obsessive–compulsive personality disorder

obsessive-compulsive personality disorderobsessive-compulsiveobsessive compulsive personality disorder
There are many different neuroses: obsessive–compulsive disorder, obsessive–compulsive personality disorder, impulse control disorder, anxiety disorder, hysteria, and a great variety of phobias.