A report on Utah and Nevada

Map showing Utah in 1838 when it was part of Mexico, Britannica 7th edition
Mexico in 1824. Alta California included today's Nevada.
Brigham Young led the first Mormon pioneers to the Great Salt Lake.
Sculpture representing a steam locomotive, in Ely, Nevada. Early locomotives played an important part in Nevada's mining industry.
A sketch of Salt Lake City in 1860
Nevada territory in 1861
Deseret Village recreates Utah pioneer life for tourists.
Mountains west of Las Vegas in the Mojave Desert
The Golden Spike where the First Transcontinental Railroad was completed in the U.S. on May 10, 1869, in Promontory, Utah
A valley near Pyramid Lake
Children reading in Santa Clara, Utah, in 1940
Topographic map of Nevada
Utah county boundaries
Little Finland rock formation in Nevada
Köppen climate types of Utah, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Köppen climate types of Nevada, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Snow in Rose Park, Salt Lake City
The Las Vegas Strip looking South
The Rocky Mountain elk is the Utah state mammal.
Carson City Mint in Carson City. Carson City is an independent city and the capital of Nevada.
The California gull is the Utah state bird.
Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area, Calico basin
Western black widow spider
Great Basin National Park
Pando, considered one of the heaviest and oldest organisms on Earth.
The quartzite of Doso Doyabi in Great Basin National Park
Joshua trees, yuccas, and cholla cactus occupy the far southwest corner of the state in the Mojave Desert
Valley of Fire State Park
"Welcome to Utah" sign
Mount Charleston
Utah population density map
Population density map of Nevada
The LDS Salt Lake Temple, the primary attraction in the city's Temple Square
The Winnemucca Sand Dunes, north of Winnemucca
First Presbyterian Church in Salt Lake City
Downtown Reno
Sri Sri Radha Krishna (Hindu) Temple
East Las Vegas suburbs
The Wasatch Front region has seen large growth and development despite the economic downturn. Shown is the City Creek Center project, a development in downtown Salt Lake City with a price tag of $1.5–2.5 billion.
Nevada quarter
One out of every 14 flash memory chips in the world is produced in Lehi, Utah.
MGM Grand, with sign promoting it as The City of Entertainment
Zion National Park in southern Utah is one of five national parks in the state.
Lake Tahoe on the Nevada–California border
Farms and ranches
Goldstrike (Post-Betze) Mine in the Carlin Trend, the largest Carlin-type deposit in the world, containing more than 35000000 ozt gold
Bryce Canyon National Park Amphitheater (winter view)
Cattle near the Bruneau River in Elko County
Mining has been a large industry in Utah since it was first settled. The Bingham Canyon Mine in Salt Lake County is one of the largest open pit mines in the world.
Ranching in Washoe County
Salt Lake International Airport is the largest airport in Utah
State route shield
FrontRunner commuter rail serves select cities from Ogden to Provo via Salt Lake City.
U.S. Route50, also known as "The Loneliest Road in America"
TRAX light rail serves Salt Lake County
The Nevada State Legislative Building in Carson City
Jake Garn (top-right), former Senator of Utah (1974–1993), and astronaut on Space Shuttle flight STS-51-D
The courthouse of the Supreme Court of Nevada
The Utah State Capitol, Salt Lake City
A map that details the federal land in southern Nevada, showing Nellis Air Force Base Complex and Nevada Test Site
The Scott Matheson Courthouse is the seat of the Utah Supreme Court.
Party registration by county (February 2021):
The Huntsman Cancer Institute on the campus of the University of Utah in Salt Lake City
The Eyring Science Center on the campus of Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah
The Utah Jazz playing against the Houston Rockets
Robbie Russell playing for Real Salt Lake
Arches National Park
Pariette Wetlands
Little Cottonwood Canyon
Deer Creek Reservoir
American Fork Canyon
Kolob Canyons at Zion National Park
Salt Lake City
Logan
thumb|Ogden
Park City
Provo
Sandy
St. George
Layton
Monument Valley in southeastern Utah. This area was used to film many Hollywood Westerns.
The otherworldly look of the Bonneville Salt Flats has been used in many movies and commercials.

Utah is a landlocked U.S. state bordered to its east by Colorado, to its northeast by Wyoming, to its north by Idaho, to its south by Arizona, and to its west by Nevada.

- Utah

It is bordered by Oregon to the northwest, Idaho to the northeast, California to the west, Arizona to the southeast, and Utah to the east.

- Nevada

24 related topics with Alpha

Overall

California

9 links

State in the Western United States.

State in the Western United States.

A map of California tribal groups and languages at the time of European contact
The coat of arms granted to the Californias by Viceroy Antonio de Mendoza
Mission San Diego de Alcalá drawn as it was in 1848. Established in 1769, it was the first of the California Missions.
Map showing Alta California in 1838, when it was a sparsely populated Mexican province
The flag used by Juan Bautista Alvarado's 1836 movement for Californian independence
The Russians from Alaska established their largest settlement in California, Fort Ross, in 1812.
The Bear Flag of the California Republic was first raised in Sonoma in 1846 during the Bear Flag Revolt.
Yokayo, a village of Pomo people in Ukiah (Mendocino County), c. 1916
Hollywood film studios, 1922
The "Birthplace of Silicon Valley" garage, where Stanford University graduates Bill Hewlett and David Packard developed their first product in the 1930s
A topographic map of California
Big Sur coast, south of Monterey at Bixby Bridge
Yosemite National Park
Cylindropuntia bigelovii in the Joshua Tree National Park
Köppen climate types in California
Death Valley, in the Mojave Desert
Five of the twenty largest wildfires in California history were part of the 2020 wildfire season.
A Joshua Tree (Yucca brevifolia) in Joshua Tree
A forest of redwood trees in Redwood National Park
Sea otter in Morro Bay, California
Mission San Diego de Alcalá, first of the Spanish missions in California
Sunset at Venice Beach
Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum hosted the Summer Olympics in 1932 and 1984.
Torrance High School, one of the oldest high schools in continuous use in California
The University of California, Berkeley is the first and oldest campus of the UC system.
The Claremont Colleges east of L.A. include some of the most selective liberal arts colleges in the U.S.
A tree map depicting the distribution of occupations across California
Orange Grove outside of Santa Paula
The Googleplex in Mountain View, California, is the corporate headquarters of Google. Silicon Valley is a center for the global technology industry.
Economic regions of California
Moss Landing Power Plant, located on the coast of Monterey Bay
Solar Energy Generating Systems, located in the Mojave Desert
The Golden Gate Bridge
The Judge Harry Pregerson Interchange in Los Angeles, one of California's tall "stack" interchanges
Map of California showing the primary roadways
Amtrak California train in Pinole
Aerial view of the Delta–Mendota Canal (left) and the California Aqueduct, at the Interstate 205 crossing west of Tracy
California budget 2022-2023
The California State Capitol in Sacramento
Democrats Jerry Brown and Eric Garcetti. Brown served twice as Governor of California and Garcetti is currently serving as Mayor of Los Angeles.
California GDP by sector in 2017<ref name="auto">{{Cite web |title=SAGDP2N Gross domestic product (GDP) by state |url=https://www.bea.gov/data/gdp/gdp-state |access-date=December 21, 2018 |publisher=Bureau of Economic Analysis}}</ref>
Had California been an independent country in 2021 its gross domestic product (nominal) would have been ranked fifth in the world.<ref>{{Cite web |title=5. Report for Selected Countries and Subjects |url=https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2016/01/weodata/weorept.aspx?pr.x=69&pr.y=15&sy=2018&ey=2018&scsm=1&ssd=1&sort=country&ds=.&br=1&c=512%2C672%2C914%2C946%2C612%2C137%2C614%2C546%2C311%2C962%2C213%2C674%2C911%2C676%2C193%2C548%2C122%2C556%2C912%2C678%2C313%2C181%2C419%2C867%2C513%2C682%2C316%2C684%2C913%2C273%2C124%2C868%2C339%2C921%2C638%2C948%2C514%2C943%2C218%2C686%2C963%2C688%2C616%2C518%2C223%2C728%2C516%2C558%2C918%2C138%2C748%2C196%2C618%2C278%2C624%2C692%2C522%2C694%2C622%2C142%2C156%2C449%2C626%2C564%2C628%2C565%2C228%2C283%2C924%2C853%2C233%2C288%2C632%2C293%2C636%2C566%2C634%2C964%2C238%2C182%2C662%2C359%2C960%2C453%2C423%2C968%2C935%2C922%2C128%2C714%2C611%2C862%2C321%2C135%2C243%2C716%2C248%2C456%2C469%2C722%2C253%2C942%2C642%2C718%2C643%2C724%2C939%2C576%2C644%2C936%2C819%2C961%2C172%2C813%2C132%2C199%2C646%2C733%2C648%2C184%2C915%2C524%2C134%2C361%2C652%2C362%2C174%2C364%2C328%2C732%2C258%2C366%2C656%2C734%2C654%2C144%2C336%2C146%2C263%2C463%2C268%2C528%2C532%2C923%2C944%2C738%2C176%2C578%2C534%2C537%2C536%2C742%2C429%2C866%2C433%2C369%2C178%2C744%2C436%2C186%2C136%2C925%2C343%2C869%2C158%2C746%2C439%2C926%2C916%2C466%2C664%2C112%2C826%2C111%2C542%2C298%2C967%2C927%2C443%2C846%2C917%2C299%2C544%2C582%2C941%2C474%2C446%2C754%2C666%2C698%2C668&s=NGDPD&grp=0&a= |url-status=dead |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20190323111307/https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2016/01/weodata/weorept.aspx?pr.x=69&pr.y=15&sy=2018&ey=2018&scsm=1&ssd=1&sort=country&ds=.&br=1&c=512%2C672%2C914%2C946%2C612%2C137%2C614%2C546%2C311%2C962%2C213%2C674%2C911%2C676%2C193%2C548%2C122%2C556%2C912%2C678%2C313%2C181%2C419%2C867%2C513%2C682%2C316%2C684%2C913%2C273%2C124%2C868%2C339%2C921%2C638%2C948%2C514%2C943%2C218%2C686%2C963%2C688%2C616%2C518%2C223%2C728%2C516%2C558%2C918%2C138%2C748%2C196%2C618%2C278%2C624%2C692%2C522%2C694%2C622%2C142%2C156%2C449%2C626%2C564%2C628%2C565%2C228%2C283%2C924%2C853%2C233%2C288%2C632%2C293%2C636%2C566%2C634%2C964%2C238%2C182%2C662%2C359%2C960%2C453%2C423%2C968%2C935%2C922%2C128%2C714%2C611%2C862%2C321%2C135%2C243%2C716%2C248%2C456%2C469%2C722%2C253%2C942%2C642%2C718%2C643%2C724%2C939%2C576%2C644%2C936%2C819%2C961%2C172%2C813%2C132%2C199%2C646%2C733%2C648%2C184%2C915%2C524%2C134%2C361%2C652%2C362%2C174%2C364%2C328%2C732%2C258%2C366%2C656%2C734%2C654%2C144%2C336%2C146%2C263%2C463%2C268%2C528%2C532%2C923%2C944%2C738%2C176%2C578%2C534%2C537%2C536%2C742%2C429%2C866%2C433%2C369%2C178%2C744%2C436%2C186%2C136%2C925%2C343%2C869%2C158%2C746%2C439%2C926%2C916%2C466%2C664%2C112%2C826%2C111%2C542%2C298%2C967%2C927%2C443%2C846%2C917%2C299%2C544%2C582%2C941%2C474%2C446%2C754%2C666%2C698%2C668&s=NGDPD&grp=0&a= |archive-date=March 23, 2019 |access-date=December 15, 2018}}</ref>
Köppen climate types in California
A topographic map of California
The famous Tunnel tree at Yosemite National Park in May of 2022
Death Valley, in the Mojave Desert

California borders Oregon to the north, Nevada and Arizona to the east, the Mexican state of Baja California to the south; and has a coastline along the Pacific Ocean to the west.

Following the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (February 2, 1848) that ended the war, the westernmost portion of the annexed Mexican territory of Alta California soon became the American state of California, and the remainder of the old territory was then subdivided into the new American Territories of Arizona, Nevada, Colorado and Utah.

Arizona

8 links

Landlocked state in the Western United States, grouped in the Southwestern and occasionally Mountain subregions.

Landlocked state in the Western United States, grouped in the Southwestern and occasionally Mountain subregions.

La conquista del Colorado, by Augusto Ferrer-Dalmau, depicts Francisco Vázquez de Coronado's 1540–1542 expedition
Mexico in 1824. Alta California is the northwesternmost state.
Geronimo (far right) and his Apache warriors fought against both Mexican and American settlers.
Children of Depression-era migrant workers, Pinal County, 1937
Eleanor Roosevelt at the Gila River relocation center, April 23, 1943
Köppen climate types of Arizona
The Grand Canyon
View of suburban development in Scottsdale, 2006
A population density map of Arizona
Extent of the Spanish language in the state of Arizona
A Navajo man on horseback in Monument Valley
The Spanish mission of San Xavier del Bac, founded in 1700
Arizona's Meteor Crater is a tourist attraction.
Entering Arizona on I-10 from New Mexico
The original Arizona State Capitol in Phoenix
Art Deco doors of the Cochise County Courthouse in Bisbee
Arizona teacher's strike and rally on April 26, 2018
The University of Arizona (the Mall) in Tucson
Arizona State University (a biodesign building) in Tempe
Northern Arizona University (The Skydome) in Flagstaff
View of Monument Valley from John Ford's Point
Standin' on the Corner Park and mural in Winslow, Arizona
State Farm Stadium in Glendale
A spring training game between the Cubs and White Sox at HoHoKam Park
Romaine, Yuma
Leaf, Yuma
Harvesting spinach during WW2
frameless
Broccoli seed crop, Yuma
Cauliflower seed crop, WW2
Volunteer, Pine

Arizona shares the Four Corners region with Utah to the north, Colorado to the northeast, and New Mexico to the east; its other neighboring states are Nevada to the northwest and California to the west and the Mexican states of Sonora and Baja California to the south and southwest.

The hydrographic Great Basin (magenta outline), distinguished from the Great Basin Desert (black), and the Basin and Range Geological Province (teal).

Great Basin

8 links

Largest area of contiguous endorheic watersheds, those with no outlets, in North America.

Largest area of contiguous endorheic watersheds, those with no outlets, in North America.

The hydrographic Great Basin (magenta outline), distinguished from the Great Basin Desert (black), and the Basin and Range Geological Province (teal).
The Tule Valley watershed and the House Range (Notch Peak) are part of the Great Basin's Great Salt Lake hydrologic unit
Ecoregions as currently delineated by the Environmental Protection Agency and World Wildlife Fund
Great Basin snowstorm in the Snake Valley of Utah and Nevada
Basin and Range topography as seen from the air
Map showing the Great Basin physiographic section (shown as 22a)
Native American tribes that inhabited the Great Basin were divided between the "Great Basin" and, in the Colorado desert region, the "California" tribal classifications.
Wah Wah Valley, Utah, thunderstorm

It spans nearly all of Nevada, much of Utah, and portions of California, Idaho, Oregon, Wyoming, and Baja California.

Colorado River

7 links

One of the principal rivers (along with the Rio Grande) in the Southwestern United States and northern Mexico.

One of the principal rivers (along with the Rio Grande) in the Southwestern United States and northern Mexico.

Headwaters of the Colorado River in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado
Colorado River in the Grand Canyon seen from Pima Point, near Hermit's Rest
Satellite view of the Colorado River valley near Yuma, Arizona; interstate 8 runs from left to right just below center.
Colorado River as it exits the United States into Mexico beneath the San Luis Colorado-Colonia Miguel Aléman Bridge (September 2009)
The San Juan River near Mexican Hat, Utah
The Green River at Mineral Bottom, just north of Canyonlands National Park
Annual Colorado River discharge volumes at Lee's Ferry between 1895 and 2004
Map showing the Upper and Lower Colorado River Basin, and adjacent areas supplied by Colorado River water.
The Black Suspension Bridge crosses the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon at Phantom Ranch, Arizona.
Remnants of basalt flows from the Uinkaret volcanic field are seen here descending into the Grand Canyon, where they dammed the Colorado over 10 times in the past 2 million years.
Navajo woman and child, photographed by Ansel Adams, c. 1944
Pueblos and cliff dwellings such as this one in New Mexico were inhabited by people of the Colorado River basin between 2,000 and 700 years ago.
Two Mohave warriors beside the Colorado River in 1871
La conquista del Colorado, by Augusto Ferrer-Dalmau, depicts Francisco Vázquez de Coronado's 1540–1542 expedition
Coronado Sets Out to the North, by Frederic Remington, c. 1905
Lithograph of Fort Yuma, c. 1875
Marble Canyon, one of the many gorges that Powell's expedition traversed
The steamboat Mohave No. 2 at Yuma, c. 1876
John D. Lee, date and photographer unknown. He established a permanent ferry across the Colorado.
Harrison Gray Otis, president of the Colorado River Land Company
Hoover Dam releasing water in 1998
The Grand Ditch, one of the earliest water diversions of the Colorado River, is still in use today.
Hoover Dam under construction, 1934
The Imperial Dam (bottom right) diverts water into the All-American Canal (center) running towards Imperial Valley.
Glen Canyon Dam, the largest dam of the Colorado River Storage Project
The main canal of the Central Arizona Project, crossing the Sonoran Desert
Lake Mead in 2010, showing the "bathtub ring" left behind by low water levels
Heavily forested banks of the Colorado River near Topock, Arizona
The Colorado was named for the reddish color caused by its natural sediment loads, but damming the river has caused it to acquire a clear green hue as seen here in lower Glen Canyon.
A rafting party on the Colorado River

Starting in the central Rocky Mountains of Colorado, it flows generally southwest across the Colorado Plateau and through the Grand Canyon before reaching Lake Mead on the Arizona–Nevada border, where it turns south toward the international border.

Here, the climate becomes significantly drier than that in the Rocky Mountains, and the river becomes entrenched in progressively deeper gorges of bare rock, beginning with Ruby Canyon and then Westwater Canyon as it enters Utah, now once again heading southwest.

Alta California

5 links

Province of New Spain, formally established in 1804.

Province of New Spain, formally established in 1804.

Map of N. America showing California when it was part of New Spain. Map dated 1789 from Dobson's Encyclopedia.
Mexico in 1838. From Britannica 7th edition
Mexican departments created in 1836 (shown after 1845 Texas independence), Las Californias at far left in gray.
Map of Mexico. S. Augustus Mitchell, Philadelphia, 1847. New California is depicted with a north-eastern border at the meridian leading north of the Rio Grande headwaters.

The territory included all of the modern U.S. states of California, Nevada, and Utah, and parts of Arizona, Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico.

Western United States

4 links

Region comprising the westernmost states of the United States.

Region comprising the westernmost states of the United States.

While the West is defined by many occupations, the American cowboy is often used as an icon of the region, here portrayed by C. M. Russell.
The West, as the most recent part of the United States, is often known for broad highways and freeways and open space. Pictured is a road in Utah to Monument Valley.
Ofu Beach on Ofu Island in American Samoa
These maps from the 2000 US Census highlight differences from state to state of three minority groups. Note that most of the American Indian, Hispanic, and Asian population is in the West.
The Western United States is subdivided into three major physiographic regions: the Rocky Mountains (16–19), the Intermontane Plateaus (20–22), and the Pacific Mountains (23–25)
Zion National Park in southern Utah is one of five national parks in the state.
Big Sur, California
The Mojave Desert covers much of the Southwestern United States
Grand Canyon, Arizona
Red sunset twilight in Landers in the High Desert region of California
The High Desert region of Oregon
Feral horses in the Pryor Mountains of Southeast Montana
Great Sand Dunes National Park, Colorado
Early Native American tribal territories
The first transcontinental railroad played a pivotal role in the history of the Western United States.
U.S. Route 66 accelerated the development of the Western United States.
Newspaper Rock State Historic Monument, Utah, contains petroglyphs left by the first inhabitants of the American Southwest.
The pioneers were among the earliest European Americans to settle in the western frontier.
The Hollywood sign in the Hollywood Hills, has come to represent the American film industry.
States where state-level laws allowed legalized medicinal marijuana before 2005
States that have no income tax at the state level

Mountain states : Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Idaho, Utah, Arizona, and Nevada

Cover of the exchange copy of the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo

Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo

4 links

Peace treaty that was signed on 2 February 1848, in the Villa de Guadalupe Hidalgo (now a neighborhood of Mexico City) between the United States and Mexico that ended the Mexican–American War (1846–1848).

Peace treaty that was signed on 2 February 1848, in the Villa de Guadalupe Hidalgo (now a neighborhood of Mexico City) between the United States and Mexico that ended the Mexican–American War (1846–1848).

Cover of the exchange copy of the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo
"Mapa de los Estados Unidos de Méjico by John Disturnell, the 1847 map used during the negotiations
Map o. S. Augustus Mitchell, Philadelphia, 1847. Alta California shown including Nevada, Utah, Arizona.
First page of the original treaty
The Mexican Cession agreed with Mexico (white) and the Gadsden Purchase (brown). Part of the area marked as Gadsden Purchase near modern-day Mesilla, New Mexico, was disputed after the Treaty.
E. Gilman, [United States (after the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo)], 1848

It gave the United States the Rio Grande as a boundary for Texas, and gave the U.S. ownership of California, Nevada, Utah, and Colorado, as well as an area comprising most of New Mexico, and approximately two-thirds of Arizona.

Idaho

4 links

State in the Pacific Northwest region of the Western United States.

State in the Pacific Northwest region of the Western United States.

Köppen climate types of Idaho, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Lake Coeur d'Alene in North Idaho
Redfish Lake in central Idaho
Priest River winding through Whitetail Butte
Bear Lake viewed from Bear Lake State Park
Bruneau Dunes State Park
Idaho population density map
There are large numbers of Americans of German and English ancestry in Idaho.
The Idaho Falls Idaho Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 2006
Average Fuel Mix (2011–2015)
I-15 shield
US-95 shield
The Idaho State Capitol in Boise
Chamber of the House of Representatives in 2018
The Jacob Spori Building at Brigham Young University-Idaho in Rexburg
Idaho State University in Pocatello
University of Idaho Arboretum in Moscow
American Falls Dam
Wheat harvest on the Palouse
A portion of Yellowstone national Park is located in Idaho. The other parts are in Montana and Wyoming.
Party registration by county (December 2018):

It borders the state of Montana and Wyoming to the east, Nevada and Utah to the south, and Washington and Oregon to the west.

New Spain

3 links

Integral territorial entity of the Spanish Empire, established by Habsburg Spain during the Spanish colonization of the Americas and having its capital in Mexico City.

Integral territorial entity of the Spanish Empire, established by Habsburg Spain during the Spanish colonization of the Americas and having its capital in Mexico City.

Giacomo Gastaldi's 1548 map of New Spain, Nueva Hispania Tabula Nova
Spanish historical presence, claimed territories, and expeditions in North America.
In 1794.
New Spain in 1819 with the boundaries established at the Adams–Onís Treaty
Hernán Cortés and La Malinche meet the emperor Moctezuma II in Tenochtitlán, November 8, 1519.
Evangelization of Mexico
An auto-da-fé in New Spain, 18th century
Girolamo Ruscelli's 1561 map of New Spain, Nueva Hispania Tabula Nova
Vázquez de Coronado Sets Out to the North (1540), by Frederic Remington, oil on canvas, 1905
General locations of the Spanish Presidios built in the 1660s, officered by Spaniards and manned by personnel from Mexico and Peru that defended the native Filipino settlements from Muslim, Wokou, Dutch and English attacks.
White represents the route of the Manila Galleons in the Pacific and the flota in the Atlantic; blue represents Portuguese routes.
Viceroy don Antonio de Mendoza and Tlaxcalan Indians battle with the Caxcanes in the Mixtón war, 1541–42 in Nueva Galicia.
José de Gálvez, 1st Marquess of Sonora, Visitador in New Spain, who initiated major reforms
Spanish and Portuguese empires in 1790.
18th-century soldado de cuera in colonial Mexico
Bernardo de Gálvez and his army at the Siege of Pensacola in 1781.
Spanish territorial claims in the northern West Coast of North America, 18th century
On September 28, 1810, Miguel Hidalgo led the siege of the Alhóndiga de Granaditas in Guanajuato
Territories of the Viceroyalty of New Spain which became parts of the United States, Mexico, and other nations by 1900.
Silver coin minted in New Spain. Silver was its most important export, starting in the 16th century. '''8 reales Carlos III - 1778
Indigenous man collecting cochineal with a deer tail by José Antonio de Alzate y Ramírez (1777). Cochineal was New Spain's most important export product after silver and its production was almost exclusively in the hands of indigenous cultivators
Arrieros in Mexico. Mules were the main way cargo was moved overland, engraving by Carl Nebel
Pedro de Alvarado, one of the first negotiators to hold office in Hibueras where he founded the towns of San Pedro Sula and Guatemala.
View of the Plaza Mayor of Mexico City, 1695 by Cristóbal de Villalpando
Indian Wedding and Flying Pole, circa 1690
New Spain after the Adams–Onís Treaty of 1819 (not including the island territories of the Pacific Ocean).
San Miguel chapel in New Mexico.
Church of Santo Domingo, Oaxaca City
Arco de Santa Catalina, Antigua Guatemala
18th century golden altar piece insede the Tegucigalpa cathedral.
Nahua depiction of smallpox, Book XII on the conquest of Mexico in the Florentine Codex (1576)
Español and Mulata with their Morisco children
Mestizo and India with their Coyote children
Carlos Francisco de Croix, 1st Marquess of Croix, Viceroy of New Spain (1766–1771)
Antonio María de Bucareli, Viceroy of New Spain
Juan Vicente de Güemes, 2nd Count of Revillagigedo, Viceroy of New Spain (1789–1794)
The cathedral of Yucatan.
Church of la merced, one of the oldest spanish churches in america and the oldest one of Honduras.

On the mainland, the administrative units included Las Californias, that is, the Baja California peninsula, still part of Mexico and divided into Baja California and Baja California Sur; Alta California (present-day Arizona, California, Nevada, Utah, western Colorado, and southern Wyoming); (from the 1760s) Louisiana (including the western Mississippi River basin and the Missouri River basin); Nueva Extremadura (the present-day states of Coahuila and Texas); and Santa Fe de Nuevo México (parts of Texas and New Mexico).

'''Clockwise from top Battle of Resaca de la Palma, U.S. victory at Churubusco outside of Mexico City, marines storming Chapultepec castle under a large U.S. flag,  Battle of Cerro Gordo

Mexican–American War

5 links

Armed conflict between the United States and Mexico from 1846 to 1848.

Armed conflict between the United States and Mexico from 1846 to 1848.

'''Clockwise from top Battle of Resaca de la Palma, U.S. victory at Churubusco outside of Mexico City, marines storming Chapultepec castle under a large U.S. flag,  Battle of Cerro Gordo
The 1832 boundaries of Comancheria, the Comanche homeland
Comanches of West Texas in war regalia, c. 1830.
Mexico in 1824 with the boundary line with the U.S. from the 1818 Adams-Onis Treaty that Spain negotiated with the U.S.
The Republic of Texas: The present-day outlines of the individual U.S. states are superimposed on the boundaries of 1836–1845.
General Antonio López de Santa Anna was a military hero who became president of Mexico on multiple occasions. The Mexican Army's intervention in politics was an ongoing issue during much of the mid-nineteenth century.
Liberal Valentín Gómez Farías, who served as Santa Anna's vice president and implemented a liberal reform in 1833, was an important political player in the era of the Mexican–American War.
U.S. Army full dress and campaign uniforms, 1835–1851.
General Zachary Taylor at the Battle of Resaca de la Palma.
Sarah A. Bowman "The Great Western," depicted as the Heroine of Fort Brown. At her death, she was buried with full military honors.
Overview map of the war. Key:
Abraham Lincoln in his late 30s as a Whig member of the U.S. House of Representatives, when he opposed the Mexican–American War. Photo taken by one of Lincoln's law students around 1846.
Ex-slave and prominent anti-slavery advocate Frederick Douglass opposed the Mexican–American War.
Henry David Thoreau spent a night in jail for not paying poll taxes to support the war and later wrote Civil Disobedience.
War News from Mexico (1848)
Gen. Kearny's annexation of New Mexico Territory, August 15, 1846
A replica of the first "Bear Flag" now at El Presidio de Sonoma, or Sonoma Barracks
Reenactors in U.S. (left) and Mexican (right) uniforms of the period
The Battle of Monterrey September 20–24, 1846, after a painting by Carl Nebel
Battle of Buena Vista
Bombardment of Veracruz
Battle of Cerro Gordo, lithograph courtesy of the Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.
Scott's campaign
The Battle of Molino del Rey
The Battle of Chapultepec
Storming of Chapultepec
U.S. Army occupation of Mexico City in 1847. The U.S. flag flying over the National Palace, the seat of the Mexican government. Carl Nebel.
Battle of Churubusco by J. Cameron, published by Nathaniel Currier. Hand tinted lithograph, 1847. Digitally restored.
The mass hanging of Irish Catholic soldiers who joined the Mexican side, forming the Saint Patrick's Battalion
Mexican territorial claims relinquished in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in white
The Mexican Cession, shown in red, and the later Gadsden Purchase, shown in yellow
Second lieutenant Ulysses S. Grant
"An Available Candidate: The One Qualification for a Whig President." Political cartoon about the 1848 presidential election, referring to Zachary Taylor or Winfield Scott, the two leading contenders for the Whig Party nomination in the aftermath of the Mexican–American War. Published by Nathaniel Currier in 1848, digitally restored.
Obelisk to the Niños Héroes, Mexico City, 1881
Memorial to the Mexican cadets killed in the Battle of Chapultepec, 1952
Commemorative plaque to the San Patricios, Mexico City, 1959
Palmetto Regiment Monument, State House grounds, Columbia, S.C. Wrought iron 1858. Sculptor: Christopher Werner
"American Army Entering the City of Mexico" by Filippo Constaggini, 1885. Architect of the Capitol
Mormon Battalion monument, Fort Moore Pioneer Monument (1950), showing raising the U.S. flag in Los Angeles, 1847

The treaty gave the U.S. undisputed control of Texas, established the U.S.-Mexican border along the Rio Grande, and ceded to the United States the present-day states of California, Nevada, and Utah, most of New Mexico, Arizona and Colorado, and parts of Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Wyoming.