Thomas Lee, the first manager of the Ohio Company of Virginia
Mexico in 1824. Alta California included today's Nevada.
A slave wedding in Virginia, 1838
Sculpture representing a steam locomotive, in Ely, Nevada. Early locomotives played an important part in Nevada's mining industry.
Map of Virginia dated June 13, 1861, featuring the percentage of slave population within each county at the 1860 census and the proposed state of Kanawha
Nevada territory in 1861
Francis H. Pierpont, a leader during the Second Wheeling Convention.
Mountains west of Las Vegas in the Mojave Desert
Abraham Lincoln Walks at Midnight, a statue on the grounds of the West Virginia State Capitol
A valley near Pyramid Lake
Harpers Ferry alternated between Confederate and Union rule eight times during the American Civil War, and was finally annexed by West Virginia.
Topographic map of Nevada
Votes by county in the October 1861 statehood vote
Little Finland rock formation in Nevada
Child labor in the coal mines of West Virginia, 1908.
Köppen climate types of Nevada, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Family of a coal miner, circa 1935
The Las Vegas Strip looking South
Saturday afternoon street scene, Welch, McDowell County, 1946
Carson City Mint in Carson City. Carson City is an independent city and the capital of Nevada.
Map of West Virginia counties
Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area, Calico basin
Shaded relief map of the Cumberland Plateau and Ridge-and-valley Appalachians
Great Basin National Park
The summit of Spruce Knob is often covered in clouds.
The quartzite of Doso Doyabi in Great Basin National Park
Köppen climate types of West Virginia, using 1991-2020 climate normals
Valley of Fire State Park
West Virginia population density map
Mount Charleston
Seneca Rocks, Pendleton County
Population density map of Nevada
Bituminous coal seam in southwestern West Virginia
The Winnemucca Sand Dunes, north of Winnemucca
Bluefield, a major center for coal mining, in 2014
Downtown Reno
The West Virginia State Capitol in Charleston is home to the West Virginia Legislature.
East Las Vegas suburbs
200x200px
Nevada quarter
A toll plaza on the West Virginia Turnpike
MGM Grand, with sign promoting it as The City of Entertainment
The iconic New River Gorge Bridge near Fayetteville
Lake Tahoe on the Nevada–California border
The Veterans Memorial Bridge carries US 22 from Steubenville into Ohio.
Goldstrike (Post-Betze) Mine in the Carlin Trend, the largest Carlin-type deposit in the world, containing more than 35000000 ozt gold
Cattle near the Bruneau River in Elko County
Ranching in Washoe County
State route shield
U.S. Route50, also known as "The Loneliest Road in America"
The Nevada State Legislative Building in Carson City
The courthouse of the Supreme Court of Nevada
A map that details the federal land in southern Nevada, showing Nellis Air Force Base Complex and Nevada Test Site

It was the only state to form by separating from a Confederate state, the second to separate from a state after Maine separated from Massachusetts, and one of two states (along with Nevada) admitted to the Union during the Civil War.

- West Virginia

Nevada became the 36th state on October 31, 1864, as the second of two states added to the Union during the Civil War (the first being West Virginia).

- Nevada

2 related topics

Alpha

Italian Americans

Italian Americans (italoamericani or italo-americani, ) are Americans who have full or partial Italian ancestry.

Italian Americans (italoamericani or italo-americani, ) are Americans who have full or partial Italian ancestry.

Landing of Cristopher Columbus (12 October 1492), painting by John Vanderlyn
Amerigo Vespucci, Italian explorer from whose name the term "America" is derived
Verrazzano's voyage of 1524. The Italian explorer was the first documented European to enter New York Harbor and the Hudson River.
Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge in New York City is named for Giovanni da Verrazzano.
Philip Mazzei, Italian physician and promoter of liberty, whose phrase: "All men are by nature equally free and independent" was incorporated into the United States Declaration of Independence
Statue of Francis Vigo
Review of the Garibaldi Guard by President Abraham Lincoln
The Garibaldi-Meucci Museum on Staten Island
The "Bambinos" of Little Italy - Syracuse, New York in 1899
Mulberry Street, along which New York City's Little Italy is centered. Lower East Side, circa 1900.
Italian immigrants entering the United States via Ellis Island in 1905
The Monongah mining disaster of 1907 described as "the worst mining disaster in American history" the official death toll stood at 362, 171 of them Italian migrants.
Little Italy in Chicago, 1909
Italian-Hawaiian woman with a poi bowl, 1909
Joe Petrosino in 1909
Michael Valente, recipient of the highest military decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his actions during World War I
Fiorello La Guardia with Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1938
Italian American WPA workers doing roadwork in Dorchester, Boston, 1930s
Rudolph Valentino with Alice Terry in The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, 1921
Historical advertisement of an Italian American restaurant, between circa 1930 and 1945
Italian-American veterans of all wars memorial, Southbridge, Massachusetts
Frank Capra receiving the Distinguished Service Medal from General George C. Marshall, 1945
Enrico Fermi, architect of the nuclear age, was awarded the 1938 Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on induced radioactivity.
Dominic Salvatore Don Gentile on the wing of his P-51B, 'Shangri-La'. Also known as "Ace of Aces", he was a World War II USAAF pilot who surpassed Eddie Rickenbacker's World War I record of 26 downed aircraft.
Joe DiMaggio, considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time, in 1951
Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin in 1963
Martin Scorsese and Francis Ford Coppola, filmmakers whose body of work explores themes such as Italian-American identity, here together with Steven Spielberg and George Lucas, are among the greatest modern directors.
Wally Schirra, one of the earliest NASA astronauts to enter into space (1962), taking part in the Mercury Seven program and later Gemini and Apollo programs
Columbus Day in Salem, Massachusetts in 1892
1973 U.S. postage stamp featuring Amadeo Giannini
Enrico Fermi between Franco Rasetti (left) and Emilio Segrè in academic dress
A fourteen year old Italian girl working at a paper-box factory (1913)
The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in 1911. The victims were almost exclusively Jewish and Italian female immigrants.
Mother Cabrini
An Italian immigrant making an American breakfast aided by instructional materials from the YMCA
Lawrence Ferlinghetti
Don DeLillo
Paola Corso
Danielle Trussoni
St. Anthony of Padua Church in New York was established in 1859 as the first parish in the United States formed specifically to serve the Italian immigrant community.
Our Lady of Pompeii Church in New York was founded in 1892 as a national parish to serve Italian-American immigrants who settled in Greenwich Village.
Emilio Segrè, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1959, was among the Italian Jews who emigrated to the United States after Mussolini's regime implemented an anti-semitic legislation.
Italian Cultural and Community Center (Logue House) in the Houston Museum District
A war-time poster
Feast of San Gennaro in New York
President Barack Obama participates in an interview with Jay Leno during a taping of "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno" at the NBC Studios in Burbank, Calif., Oct. 24, 2012.
Italian American Museum of Los Angeles
Sacco and Vanzetti in handcuffs
One of the largest mass lynchings in American history involved eleven Italian immigrants in New Orleans in 1891.
Top ancestry by U.S. county. Dark blue indicates counties where persons of Italian ancestry form a plurality.
Little Italy in Manhattan after Italy won the 2006 FIFA World Cup
Much of Philadelphia's Italian population is in South Philadelphia, and is well known for its Italian Market.
The American and Italian flags in Boston's North End
St. Lucy's Church in Newark
Northside in Syracuse
Feast of the Assumption in Cleveland's Little Italy
Gateway to Ybor City on 7th. Ave near the Nick Nuccio Parkway
Sts. Peter and Paul Church in North Beach, San Francisco

Tens of thousands of Italians came to West Virginia during the late 1800s and early 1900s to work in the coal camps.

28) Nevada 172,633 (6.3%)

Notable Irish Americans

Irish Americans

Irish Americans or Hiberno-Americans (Gael-Mheiriceánaigh) are Americans who have full or partial ancestry from Ireland.

Irish Americans or Hiberno-Americans (Gael-Mheiriceánaigh) are Americans who have full or partial ancestry from Ireland.

Notable Irish Americans
Charles Carroll, the sole Catholic signer of the U.S. Declaration of Independence, was the descendant of Irish nobility in County Tipperary. Signers Matthew Thornton, George Taylor were born in Ireland and were "Ulster" Scots, while Thomas Lynch Jr., for example, was Protestant; he was of Irish ancestry and retained a strong Irish identity.
"Leacht Cuimhneacháin na nGael", Irish famine memorial located on Penn's Landing, Philadelphia
Thomas Ambrose Butler, an Irish Catholic priest, was a leading voice in urging Irish immigrants to colonize Kansas
Gravestone in Boston Catholic cemetery erected in memory of County Roscommon native born shortly before the Great Famine
Population density of people born in Ireland, 1870; these were mostly Catholics; the older Scots Irish immigration is not shown.
U.S. President Grover Cleveland twisting the tail of the British Lion as Americans cheer in the Venezuelan crisis of 1895; cartoon in Puck by J.S. Pughe
American political cartoon by Thomas Nast titled "The Usual Irish Way of Doing Things", depicting a drunken Irishman lighting a powder keg and swinging a bottle. Published 2 September 1871 in Harper's Weekly
The Orange riot of 1871 as depicted in Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper. The view is at 25th Street in Manhattan looking south down Eighth Avenue.
St. Augustine's Church on fire. Anti-Irish, anti-Catholic Nativist riots in Philadelphia in 1844.
The mass hanging of Irish Catholic soldiers who joined the Mexican army
Officers and men of the Irish-Catholic 69th New York Volunteer Regiment attend church services at Fort Corcoran in 1861.
Irish Lass depiction in 1885.
Irish immigrants in Kansas City, Missouri, c. 1909
1862 song (Female versian)
1862 song that used the "No Irish Need Apply" slogan. It was copied from a similar London song.
New York Times want ad 1854—the only New York Times ad with NINA for men.
1882 illustration from Puck depicting Irish immigrants as troublemakers, as compared to those of other nationalities
St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York
Logo of the Boston Celtics basketball team
The Philadelphia Phillies started the tradition of wearing green uniforms on St. Patrick's day.
Two Irish stars: "Gentleman Jim" Corbett licks John L. Sullivan in 1892
Actor Tom Cruise descends from paternal Irish ("Cruise" and "O'Mara") lineage around County Dublin.
Irish Republican mural in South Boston, Massachusetts
The Chicago River, dyed green for the 2005 St. Patrick's Day celebration
1928 Democratic Presidential Nominee Al Smith was the first Irish Catholic nominee of a major political party.
Distribution of Irish Americans according to the 2000 Census
President John F. Kennedy in motorcade in Cork on June 27, 1963
President Ronald Reagan speaking to a large crowd in his ancestral home in Ballyporeen, Ireland, in 1984.
President Barack Obama greets local residents on Main Street in Moneygall, Ireland, May 23, 2011.

West Virginia (14.8%)

Nevada (10.9%)