Nevada

Mexico in 1824. Alta California included today's Nevada.
Sculpture representing a steam locomotive, in Ely, Nevada. Early locomotives played an important part in Nevada's mining industry.
Nevada territory in 1861
Mountains west of Las Vegas in the Mojave Desert
A valley near Pyramid Lake
Topographic map of Nevada
Little Finland rock formation in Nevada
Köppen climate types of Nevada, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
The Las Vegas Strip looking South
Carson City Mint in Carson City. Carson City is an independent city and the capital of Nevada.
Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area, Calico basin
Great Basin National Park
The quartzite of Doso Doyabi in Great Basin National Park
Valley of Fire State Park
Mount Charleston
Population density map of Nevada
The Winnemucca Sand Dunes, north of Winnemucca
Downtown Reno
East Las Vegas suburbs
Nevada quarter
MGM Grand, with sign promoting it as The City of Entertainment
Lake Tahoe on the Nevada–California border
Goldstrike (Post-Betze) Mine in the Carlin Trend, the largest Carlin-type deposit in the world, containing more than 35000000 ozt gold
Cattle near the Bruneau River in Elko County
Ranching in Washoe County
State route shield
U.S. Route50, also known as "The Loneliest Road in America"
The Nevada State Legislative Building in Carson City
The courthouse of the Supreme Court of Nevada
A map that details the federal land in southern Nevada, showing Nellis Air Force Base Complex and Nevada Test Site

State in the Western region of the United States.

- Nevada

199 related topics

Alpha

Wheeler Peak, elevation 13,065 feet (3,982 m), in Great Basin National Park.

White Pine County, Nevada

Wheeler Peak, elevation 13,065 feet (3,982 m), in Great Basin National Park.
Timber Creek in the Schell Creek Range
A limber (white) pine tree in Nevada
Steam excursion train at the Nevada Northern Railway Museum's East Ely depot

White Pine County is a largely rural, mountain county along the central eastern boundary of the U.S. state of Nevada.

Rabbit-Tail

Shoshone

They traditionally speak the Shoshoni language, part of the Numic languages branch of the large Uto-Aztecan language family.

They traditionally speak the Shoshoni language, part of the Numic languages branch of the large Uto-Aztecan language family.

Rabbit-Tail
A Shoshone encampment in the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming, photographed by W. H. Jackson, 1870
Reported picture of Mike Daggett February 26,1911
Sheriff Charles Ferrel with the surviving members of Mike Daggett's family ( Dagget's daughter Heney (Louise, 17), and two of his grandchildren, Cleveland (Mosho, 8), Hattie (Harriet Mosho, 4))
Dagget grandchild Mary Jo Estep {1909/1910-1992} age 5 in 1916
Tindoor, Lemhi Shoshone chief and his wife, ca. 1897, photographed by Benedicte Wrensted
"Shoshone at Ft. Washakie, Wyoming Native American reservation. Chief Washakie (at left) extends his right arm." Some of the Shoshones are dancing as the soldiers look on, 1892

Western Shoshone: Nevada, northern Utah

Truckee River

The Truckee River at Verdi, Nevada, when the Central Pacific Railroad reached the site in 1868
The Truckee River in Truckee, California, with Donner Creek flowing in from the right
Aerial view from the south of the Truckee River where it drains to Pyramid Lake
Rafting and tubing for recreation on the Truckee River in Reno Nevada USA on the 4th of July 2018
The headwaters of the Truckee River at Lake Tahoe Dam
The Truckee River near Truckee, California.

The Truckee River is a river in the U.S. states of California and Nevada.

Cover of the exchange copy of the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo

Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo

Peace treaty that was signed on 2 February 1848, in the Villa de Guadalupe Hidalgo (now a neighborhood of Mexico City) between the United States and Mexico that ended the Mexican–American War (1846–1848).

Peace treaty that was signed on 2 February 1848, in the Villa de Guadalupe Hidalgo (now a neighborhood of Mexico City) between the United States and Mexico that ended the Mexican–American War (1846–1848).

Cover of the exchange copy of the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo
"Mapa de los Estados Unidos de Méjico by John Disturnell, the 1847 map used during the negotiations
Map o. S. Augustus Mitchell, Philadelphia, 1847. Alta California shown including Nevada, Utah, Arizona.
First page of the original treaty
The Mexican Cession agreed with Mexico (white) and the Gadsden Purchase (brown). Part of the area marked as Gadsden Purchase near modern-day Mesilla, New Mexico, was disputed after the Treaty.
E. Gilman, [United States (after the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo)], 1848

It gave the United States the Rio Grande as a boundary for Texas, and gave the U.S. ownership of California, Nevada, Utah and Colorado, as well as an area comprising most of New Mexico, and approximately two thirds of Arizona.

Washoe woman

Washoe people

Washoe woman
Louisa Keyser (Dat So La Lee), Washoe basketweaver

The Washoe or Wašišiw ("people from here", or transliterated in older literature as Wa She Shu) are a Great Basin tribe of Native Americans, living near Lake Tahoe at the border between California and Nevada.

'''Clockwise from top Battle of Resaca de la Palma, U.S. victory at Churubusco outside of Mexico City, marines storming Chapultepec castle under a large U.S. flag,  Battle of Cerro Gordo

Mexican–American War

Armed conflict between the United States and Mexico from 1846 to 1848.

Armed conflict between the United States and Mexico from 1846 to 1848.

'''Clockwise from top Battle of Resaca de la Palma, U.S. victory at Churubusco outside of Mexico City, marines storming Chapultepec castle under a large U.S. flag,  Battle of Cerro Gordo
The 1832 boundaries of Comancheria, the Comanche homeland
Comanches of West Texas in war regalia, c. 1830.
Mexico in 1824 with the boundary line with the U.S. from the 1818 Adams-Onis Treaty that Spain negotiated with the U.S.
The Republic of Texas: The present-day outlines of the individual U.S. states are superimposed on the boundaries of 1836–1845.
General Antonio López de Santa Anna was a military hero who became president of Mexico on multiple occasions. The Mexican Army's intervention in politics was an ongoing issue during much of the mid-nineteenth century.
Liberal Valentín Gómez Farías, who served as Santa Anna's vice president and implemented a liberal reform in 1833, was an important political player in the era of the Mexican–American War.
U.S. Army full dress and campaign uniforms, 1835–1851.
General Zachary Taylor at the Battle of Resaca de la Palma.
Sarah A. Bowman "The Great Western," depicted as the Heroine of Fort Brown. At her death, she was buried with full military honors.
Overview map of the war. Key:
Abraham Lincoln in his late 30s as a Whig member of the U.S. House of Representatives, when he opposed the Mexican–American War. Photo taken by one of Lincoln's law students around 1846.
Ex-slave and prominent anti-slavery advocate Frederick Douglass opposed the Mexican–American War.
Henry David Thoreau spent a night in jail for not paying poll taxes to support the war and later wrote Civil Disobedience.
War News from Mexico (1848)
Gen. Kearny's annexation of New Mexico Territory, August 15, 1846
A replica of the first "Bear Flag" now at El Presidio de Sonoma, or Sonoma Barracks
Reenactors in U.S. (left) and Mexican (right) uniforms of the period
The Battle of Monterrey September 20–24, 1846, after a painting by Carl Nebel
Battle of Buena Vista
Bombardment of Veracruz
Battle of Cerro Gordo, lithograph courtesy of the Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.
Scott's campaign
The Battle of Molino del Rey
The Battle of Chapultepec
Storming of Chapultepec
U.S. Army occupation of Mexico City in 1847. The U.S. flag flying over the National Palace, the seat of the Mexican government. Carl Nebel.
Battle of Churubusco by J. Cameron, published by Nathaniel Currier. Hand tinted lithograph, 1847. Digitally restored.
The mass hanging of Irish Catholic soldiers who joined the Mexican side, forming the Saint Patrick's Battalion
Mexican territorial claims relinquished in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in white
The Mexican Cession, shown in red, and the later Gadsden Purchase, shown in yellow
Second lieutenant Ulysses S. Grant
"An Available Candidate: The One Qualification for a Whig President." Political cartoon about the 1848 presidential election, referring to Zachary Taylor or Winfield Scott, the two leading contenders for the Whig Party nomination in the aftermath of the Mexican–American War. Published by Nathaniel Currier in 1848, digitally restored.
Obelisk to the Niños Héroes, Mexico City, 1881
Memorial to the Mexican cadets killed in the Battle of Chapultepec, 1952
Commemorative plaque to the San Patricios, Mexico City, 1959
Palmetto Regiment Monument, State House grounds, Columbia, S.C. Wrought iron 1858. Sculptor: Christopher Werner
"American Army Entering the City of Mexico" by Filippo Constaggini, 1885. Architect of the Capitol
Mormon Battalion monument, Fort Moore Pioneer Monument (1950), showing raising the U.S. flag in Los Angeles, 1847

The treaty gave the U.S. undisputed control of Texas, established the U.S.-Mexican border along the Rio Grande, and ceded to the United States the present-day states of California, Nevada, and Utah, most of New Mexico, Arizona and Colorado, and parts of Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Wyoming.

Snake River

Major river of the greater Pacific Northwest region in the United States.

Major river of the greater Pacific Northwest region in the United States.

The Snake River exits Jackson Lake and winds southwards through Jackson Hole
The Clearwater River (left) joins the Snake River (center) at Lewiston
South Fork of the Snake River in Idaho
Locations of the Yellowstone hotspot as it passed through the Snake River Plain
Shoshone Falls near Twin Falls, Idaho
The extraordinarily flat and expansive Snake River Plain was the result of the Lake Bonneville floods and the Yellowstone Hotspot
The Snake River flows through an arid gorge nearing its mouth in Washington
Map of the Columbia River Basin with the Snake River highlighted in yellow and the Columbia River in blue
Dams like Milner Dam divert water from the Snake River for irrigation, which causes many of the pollution problems in the Snake
Snake River Scene (1920) by L.T. Walter
The Snake River flowing through the Palouse region about 10 miles (16 km) above its mouth on the Columbia River
The Snake River near Jackson, Wyoming, in 1871
An unidentified steamboat sails up the Snake River in either Washington or Idaho in 1898
Brownlee Dam, the uppermost dam of the Hells Canyon Project
The Little Goose Lock and Dam
Columbia River Basin
In the middle reaches of the Snake River as it flows through the Snake River Plain, introduced species have fared better than native species
The headwaters of the Snake River remain heavily forested, especially inside protected areas
Reaches such as this one in Hells Canyon are no longer accessible to salmon due to the construction of dams
The Clearwater River is the largest tributary of the Snake River
Henrys Fork is the largest tributary upstream of the Snake River Plain
The Grande Ronde River meets the Snake near the lower part of Hells Canyon
The Salmon River is the second-largest tributary, joining the Snake in Hells Canyon

Its watershed is the 10th largest among North American rivers, and covers almost 108000 sqmi in portions of six U.S. states: Wyoming, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, Oregon, and Washington, with the largest portion in Idaho.

Douglas County, Nevada

Douglas County is a county in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Nevada.

Santa Rosa Range, Humboldt National Forest.

Humboldt County, Nevada

Santa Rosa Range, Humboldt National Forest.
The Winnemucca Sand Dunes, north of Winnemucca
Winnemucca State Bank and Trust building is on the National Register of Historic Places.
Wildflowers in Paradise Valley, 2008

Humboldt County is a county in the U.S. state of Nevada.

Elko, Nevada

Elko was settled with the coming of the railroad, which still runs past downtown Elko near the Humboldt River.
View southwest along the Humboldt River from the 9th Street Footbridge in downtown Elko
View of Elko from "E" Mountain
View northeast along Idaho Street (SR 535) in downtown Elko
Goldstrike mine, a large gold mine near Elko
The iconic "White King" at the Commercial Casino in downtown Elko
Elko Hot Hole, a hot spring on the southwest edge of the city
KENV TV studios in Elko
Interstate 80 in Elko
Elko Airport terminal

Elko (Shoshoni: Natakkoa, "Rocks Piled on One Another") is the largest city in and county seat of Elko County, Nevada, United States.