Nevi'im

Books of the ProphetsProphetsBook of the ProphetsNaviformer prophetsprophetic booksHebrew prophetsthe ProphetsLatter Prophetsprophet
Nevi'im ( Nəḇî'îm, lit. "spokespersons", "Prophets") is the second main division of the Hebrew Bible (the Tanakh), between the Torah (instruction) and Ketuvim (writings).wikipedia
520 Related Articles

Ketuvim

WritingsKetuvim ("Writings")Biblical
Nevi'im ( Nəḇî'îm, lit. "spokespersons", "Prophets") is the second main division of the Hebrew Bible (the Tanakh), between the Torah (instruction) and Ketuvim (writings). The Book of Daniel is part of the Writings, or Ketuvim, in the Tanakh.
Ketuvim ( Kəṯûḇîm, "writings") is the third and final section of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible), after Torah (instruction) and Nevi'im (prophets).

Books of Samuel

1 Samuel2 SamuelSamuel
In Judaism, Samuel and Kings are each counted as one book.
The Books of Samuel, 1 Samuel and 2 Samuel, form part of the narrative history of Israel in the Nevi'im or "prophets" section of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, called the Deuteronomistic history, a series of books (Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings) that constitute a theological history of the Israelites and aim to explain God's law for Israel under the guidance of the prophets.

Twelve Minor Prophets

Book of the Twelve Minor Prophetsminor prophetsminor prophet
In addition, twelve relatively short prophetic books are counted as one in a single collection called Trei Asar or "The Twelve Minor Prophets". The Latter Prophets are divided into two groups, the Major prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah and Ezekiel) and the Twelve Minor Prophets (Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi) collected into a single book.
The Minor Prophets or Twelve Prophets (תרי עשר, Trei Asar, "Twelve"), occasionally Book of the Twelve, is the last book of the Nevi'im, the second main division of the Jewish Tanakh.

Hebrew Bible

biblicalBibleHebrew
Nevi'im ( Nəḇî'îm, lit. "spokespersons", "Prophets") is the second main division of the Hebrew Bible (the Tanakh), between the Torah (instruction) and Ketuvim (writings).
Tanakh is an acronym of the first Hebrew letter of each of the Masoretic Text's three traditional subdivisions: Torah ("Teaching", also known as the Five Books of Moses), Nevi'im ("Prophets") and Ketuvim ("Writings")—hence TaNaKh.

Haftarah

haftarothafṭarothaftorah
In the Jewish liturgy, selections from the books of Nevi'im known as the Haftarah are read publicly in the synagogue after the reading of the Torah on each Shabbat, as well as on Jewish festivals and fast days.
haphtara, Hebrew: הפטרה; "parting," "taking leave", plural haftoros or haftorot is a series of selections from the books of Nevi'im ("Prophets") of the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh) that is publicly read in synagogue as part of Jewish religious practice.

Torah

LawPentateuchMosaic Law
Nevi'im ( Nəḇî'îm, lit. "spokespersons", "Prophets") is the second main division of the Hebrew Bible (the Tanakh), between the Torah (instruction) and Ketuvim (writings).
This title, however, is found neither in the Torah itself, nor in the works of the pre-Exilic literary prophets.

Judaism

JewishJewsJew
In Judaism, Samuel and Kings are each counted as one book.
Reform Judaism, called Liberal or Progressive Judaism in many countries, defines Judaism in relatively universalist terms, rejects most of the ritual and ceremonial laws of the Torah while observing moral laws, and emphasizes the ethical call of the Prophets. Reform Judaism has developed an egalitarian prayer service in the vernacular (along with Hebrew in many cases) and emphasizes personal connection to Jewish tradition.

David

King DavidDavid and GoliathDavidic
The period of the life of Saul prior to meeting David (1 Samuel 8:1–15:35).
He is honored in the prophetic literature as an ideal king and an ancestor of a future Messiah, and many psalms are ascribed to him.

Book of Isaiah

IsaiahIs.Deutero-Isaiah
The 66 chapters of Isaiah (Yeshayahu [ישעיהו]) consist primarily of prophecies of the judgments awaiting nations that are persecuting Judah.
The Book of Isaiah is the first of the Latter Prophets in the Hebrew Bible and the first of the Major Prophets in the Christian Old Testament.

Book of Daniel

DanielDan.Dan
The Book of Daniel is part of the Writings, or Ketuvim, in the Tanakh.
Further evidence of the book's date is in the fact that Daniel is excluded from the Hebrew Bible's canon of the prophets, which was closed around 200 BC, and the Wisdom of Sirach, a work dating from around 180 BC, draws on almost every book of the Old Testament except Daniel, leading scholars to suppose that its author was unaware of it. Daniel is, however, quoted in a section of the Sibylline Oracles commonly dated to the middle of the 2nd century BC, and was popular at Qumran at much the same time, suggesting that it was known from the middle of that century.

Major prophet

four major prophetsmajormajor prophetic
The Latter Prophets are divided into two groups, the Major prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah and Ezekiel) and the Twelve Minor Prophets (Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi) collected into a single book.
In the Hebrew Bible the Books of Isaiah, Jeremiah and Ezekiel are included among the Nevi'im (Prophets) but Lamentations and Daniel are placed among the Ketuvim (Writings).

Book of Jeremiah

JeremiahJer.Hananiah
The Book of Jeremiah (Yirmiyahu [ירמיהו]) can be divided into twenty-three chapters, which are organized into five sub-sections or books.
The Book of Jeremiah (ספר יִרְמְיָהוּ; abbreviated Jer. or Jerm. in citations) is the second of the Latter Prophets in the Hebrew Bible, and the second of the Prophets in the Christian Old Testament.

Book of Ezekiel

EzekielEzek.Yekhezqel
The Book of Ezekiel (Yehezq'el [יחזקאל]) contains three distinct sections.
The Book of Ezekiel is the third of the Latter Prophets in the Tanakh and one of the major prophetic books in the Old Testament, following Isaiah and Jeremiah.

Samuel

Prophet Samuel11 SamuelHannah and the Birth of Samuel
3) the people's request to God to give them a king so that they can occupy the land in the face of their enemies (in the books of 1st & 2nd Samuel)
A seer, based at Ramah, and seemingly known scarcely beyond the immediate neighbourhood of Ramah (Saul, for example, not having heard of him, with his servant informing him of his existence instead). In this role, Samuel is associated with the bands of musical ecstatic roaming prophets (Nevi'im – neb'im) at Gibeah, Bethel, and Gilgal, and some traditional scholars have argued that Samuel was the founder of these groups. At Ramah, Samuel secretly anointed Saul, after having met him for the first time, while Saul was looking for his father's lost donkeys, and treated him to a meal.

Jeremiah

Prophet JeremiahJeremiasIeremias
Jeremiah's prophecies are noted for the frequent repetitions found in them of the same words, phrases, and imagery.
Judaism considers the Book of Jeremiah part of its canon, and regards Jeremiah as the second of the major prophets.

Book of Jonah

JonahJonah and the WhaleJonas
5) Jonah or Yonah [יונה]
The Book of Jonah is a book of the Nevi’im (“Prophets”) in the Hebrew Bible.

Moab

MoabiteMountains of Gilead/MoabKingdom of Moab
These nations include Babylon, Assyria, Philistia, Moab, Syria, Israel (the northern kingdom), Ethiopia, Egypt, Arabia, and Phoenicia.
Although allusions to Moab are frequent in the prophetical books and although two chapters of Isaiah (15 and 16) and one of Jeremiah (48) are devoted to the "burden of Moab," they give little information about the land.

Book of Zechariah

ZechariahZachariasZechariah, God's providential dealings
11) Zechariah Zekharia [זכריה]
The Book of Zechariah, attributed to the Hebrew prophet Zechariah, is included in the Twelve Minor Prophets in the Hebrew Bible.

Book of Malachi

MalachiMalachi, the coming messengercoming messenger
12) Malachi or Malakhi [מלאכי]
Malachi (or Malachias; מַלְאָכִי, ) is the last book of the Neviim contained in the Tanakh, canonically the last of the Twelve Minor Prophets.

Moses

MosaicMosheMusa
The Book of Joshua (Yehoshua יהושע) contains a history of the Israelites from the death of Moses to that of Joshua.

Book of Obadiah

ObadiahAbdiædate of his ministry
4) Obadiah or Ovadyah [עובדיה]
In Judaism, Obadiah is considered a "later prophet", placed in the last section (Nevi'im) of the Tanakh, where it is one of the "Twelve Prophets."

Land of Israel

IsraelEretz IsraelEretz Yisrael
A targum is an Aramaic translation of the Hebrew Scriptures that was compiled or written in the Land of Israel or in Babylonia from the Second Temple period until the early Middle Ages (late first millennium). Like Targum Onkelos on the Torah, Targum Jonathan is an eastern (Babylonian) targum with early origins in the west (Land of Israel).
It holds that the area is a God-given inheritance of the Jewish people based on the Torah, particularly the books of Genesis and Exodus, as well as on the later Prophets.

Codex Cairensis

Cairo CodexCairo Codex of the Prophets
* Codex Cairensis
The Codex Cairensis (also: Codex Prophetarum Cairensis, Cairo Codex of the Prophets) is a Hebrew manuscript containing the complete text of the Hebrew Bible Nevi'im (prophets).

Targum Jonathan

Targum of JonathanRabbi Yonathan ben UzielTargum
Like Targum Onkelos on the Torah, Targum Jonathan is an eastern (Babylonian) targum with early origins in the west (Land of Israel).
Targum Jonathan, otherwise referred to as Targum Yonasan/Yonatan, is the official eastern (Babylonian) targum to the Nevi'im.

Targum

targumimAramaic TargumsAramaic Bible translations of that name
A targum is an Aramaic translation of the Hebrew Scriptures that was compiled or written in the Land of Israel or in Babylonia from the Second Temple period until the early Middle Ages (late first millennium).
Targum Jonathan ben Uzziel on the Nevi'im (Prophets)