New Brunswick

NBProvince of New BrunswickNew Brunswick, CanadaNew-BrunswickProvince of New Brunswick, CanadaColony of New Brunswick NB Culture of New BrunswickNew Brunswick ProvinceNouveau-Brunswick
New Brunswick (Nouveau-Brunswick, ) is one of four Atlantic provinces on the east coast of Canada.wikipedia
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Fredericton

Fredericton, New BrunswickFredericton, NBCity of Fredericton
Atypically for Canada, only about half of the population lives in urban areas, mostly in Greater Moncton, Greater Saint John and the capital Fredericton.
Fredericton is the capital of the Canadian province of New Brunswick.

Greater Moncton

Metro MonctonGreater Moncton, New BrunswickList of communities in Greater Moncton
Atypically for Canada, only about half of the population lives in urban areas, mostly in Greater Moncton, Greater Saint John and the capital Fredericton.
Greater Moncton is also known as Greater Moncton Census Metropolitan Area, Moncton Metropolitan Area or Moncton CMA, and is located in New Brunswick, Canada.

Saint John, New Brunswick

Saint JohnSt. John, New BrunswickSt. John
In 1785 Saint John became Canada's first incorporated city.
Saint John is a port city on the Bay of Fundy in the Canadian province of New Brunswick.

Nova Scotia

NSNova Scotia, CanadaNova Scotian
In 1784, after an influx of refugees from the American Revolutionary War, the province was partitioned from Nova Scotia. In 1867, New Brunswick was one of four founding provinces of the Canadian Confederation, along with Nova Scotia and the Province of Canada (now Ontario and Quebec).
The province was first named in the 1621 Royal Charter granting to Sir William Alexander in 1632 the right to settle lands including modern Nova Scotia, Cape Breton Island, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and the Gaspé Peninsula.

Canadian Confederation

ConfederationConfederation of CanadaFather of Confederation
In 1867, New Brunswick was one of four founding provinces of the Canadian Confederation, along with Nova Scotia and the Province of Canada (now Ontario and Quebec).
Canadian Confederation (Confédération canadienne) was the process by which the British colonies of the Province of Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick were united into one federation, Canada (formally the Dominion of Canada), on July 1, 1867.

Quebec

QuébecProvince of QuebecQC
In 1867, New Brunswick was one of four founding provinces of the Canadian Confederation, along with Nova Scotia and the Province of Canada (now Ontario and Quebec).
It is bordered to the west by the province of Ontario and the bodies of water James Bay and Hudson Bay; to the north by Hudson Strait and Ungava Bay; to the east by the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and the province of Newfoundland and Labrador; and to the south by the province of New Brunswick and the US states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York.

Greater Saint John

Atypically for Canada, only about half of the population lives in urban areas, mostly in Greater Moncton, Greater Saint John and the capital Fredericton.
Greater Saint John (Grand Saint John) is a metropolitan area surrounding Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada.

Kouchibouguac National Park

Claire-FontaineKouchibouguacClaire-Fontaine, New Brunswick
Popular destinations include Fundy National Park and the Hopewell Rocks, Kouchibouguac National Park, and Roosevelt Campobello International Park.
Kouchibouguac National Park is located on the east coast of New Brunswick, in Kouchibouguac.

Maliseet

WolastoqiyikMaleciteMaliseet people
Being relatively close to Europe, New Brunswick was among the first places in North America to be explored and settled by Europeans, starting with the French in the early 1600s, who displaced the indigenous Mi'kmaq, Maliseet, and the Passamaquoddy peoples.
They are the Indigenous people of the Saint John River valley and its tributaries, and their territory extends across the current borders of New Brunswick and Quebec in Canada, and parts of Maine in the United States.

Passamaquoddy

Passamaquoddy peoplePassamaquoddy TribePassamaquoddy Tribe of Maine
Being relatively close to Europe, New Brunswick was among the first places in North America to be explored and settled by Europeans, starting with the French in the early 1600s, who displaced the indigenous Mi'kmaq, Maliseet, and the Passamaquoddy peoples.
The Passamaquoddy (Peskotomuhkati or Pestomuhkati in the Passamaquoddy language) are an American Indian/First Nations people who live in northeastern North America, primarily in Maine, United States, and New Brunswick, Canada.

Fundy National Park

FundyHastingsHastings, New Brunswick
Popular destinations include Fundy National Park and the Hopewell Rocks, Kouchibouguac National Park, and Roosevelt Campobello International Park.
Fundy National Park is a national park of Canada located on the Bay of Fundy, near the village of Alma, New Brunswick.

Shediac

Shediac, New BrunswickChapman CornerShediac NB
Although these tribes did not leave a written record, their language is present in many placenames, such as Aroostook, Bouctouche, Petitcodiac, Quispamsis, and Shediac.
Shediac (2016 population: 6,664 ) is a Canadian town in Westmorland County, New Brunswick.

Bouctouche

Bouctouche, New BrunswickBuctoucheBuctouche, New Brunswick
Although these tribes did not leave a written record, their language is present in many placenames, such as Aroostook, Bouctouche, Petitcodiac, Quispamsis, and Shediac.
Bouctouche is a Canadian town in Kent County, New Brunswick.

Bay of Fundy

FundybayFundy Bay
New Brunswick may have been part of Vinland during the Norse exploration of North America, and Basque, Breton, and Norman fishermen may have visited the Bay of Fundy in the early 1500s.
The Bay of Fundy (Baie de Fundy) is a bay between the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, with a small portion touching the US state of Maine.

Saint John River (Bay of Fundy)

Saint John RiverSt. John RiverSaint John
In 1604, a party including Samuel de Champlain visited the mouth of the Saint John River on the eponymous Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day.
The Saint John River is a 673 km long river that flows from Northern Maine into Canada, and runs south along the western side of New Brunswick, emptying into the Atlantic Ocean in the Bay of Fundy.

Canada

CanadianCANCanadians
New Brunswick (Nouveau-Brunswick, ) is one of four Atlantic provinces on the east coast of Canada.
New Brunswick was in turn split from Nova Scotia as part of a reorganization of Loyalist settlements in the Maritimes which led to the incorporation of Saint John, New Brunswick to become Canada's first city.

Hopewell Rocks

Popular destinations include Fundy National Park and the Hopewell Rocks, Kouchibouguac National Park, and Roosevelt Campobello International Park.
The Hopewell Rocks, also called the Flowerpots Rocks or simply The Rocks, are rock formations caused by tidal erosion in The Hopewell Rocks Ocean Tidal Exploration Site in New Brunswick.

Petitcodiac, New Brunswick

Petitcodiac
Although these tribes did not leave a written record, their language is present in many placenames, such as Aroostook, Bouctouche, Petitcodiac, Quispamsis, and Shediac. Other settlements in the southeast extended from Beaubassin, near the present-day border with Nova Scotia, to Baie Verte, and up the Petitcodiac, Memramcook, and Shepody Rivers.
Petitcodiac is a Canadian village in Westmorland County, New Brunswick.

Vinland

North AmericaVínlandAmerica
New Brunswick may have been part of Vinland during the Norse exploration of North America, and Basque, Breton, and Norman fishermen may have visited the Bay of Fundy in the early 1500s.
Vinland was the name given to North America as far as it was explored by the Norse, presumably including both Newfoundland and the Gulf of Saint Lawrence as far as northeastern New Brunswick (where the eponymous grapevines are found).

Samuel de Champlain

ChamplainSamuel ChamplainChamplain Monument
In 1604, a party including Samuel de Champlain visited the mouth of the Saint John River on the eponymous Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day.
From 1604 to 1607, he participated in the exploration and settlement of the first permanent European settlement north of Florida, Port Royal, Acadia (1605), as well as the first European settlement that would become Saint John, New Brunswick (1604).

Aroostook, New Brunswick

AroostookAroostook, NB
Although these tribes did not leave a written record, their language is present in many placenames, such as Aroostook, Bouctouche, Petitcodiac, Quispamsis, and Shediac.
Aroostook (2016 population: 306 ) is a Canadian village in Victoria County, New Brunswick.

Isthmus of Chignecto

ChignectoChignecto IsthmusRaid on Chignecto
The ownership of continental Acadia (New Brunswick) remained disputed, with an informal border on the Isthmus of Chignecto.
The Isthmus of Chignecto is an isthmus bordering the Maritime provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia that connects the Nova Scotia peninsula with North America.

Expulsion of the Acadians

Great UpheavalGreat ExpulsionAcadian Expulsion
Unable to make most of the Acadians sign an unconditional oath of allegiance, British authorities undertook a campaign to expel the Acadians in the initial periods of the Seven Years' War.
The Expulsion of the Acadians, also known as the Great Upheaval, the Great Expulsion, the Great Deportation and Le Grand Dérangement, was the forced removal by the British of the Acadian people from the present day Canadian Maritime provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and northern Maine — parts of an area also known as Acadia.

Shepody, New Brunswick

ShepodyChipoudy
Other settlements in the southeast extended from Beaubassin, near the present-day border with Nova Scotia, to Baie Verte, and up the Petitcodiac, Memramcook, and Shepody Rivers.
Shepody (formerly Chipoudy) is a small community in Southeastern New Brunswick on Route 114.

Constitution of Canada

Canadian ConstitutionConstitutionconstitutional
According to the Constitution of Canada, New Brunswick is the only bilingual province.
Initially, on 1 July 1867, four provinces entered into confederation as "One dominion under the name of Canada": Canada West (former Upper Canada, now Ontario), Canada East (former Lower Canada, now Quebec), Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick.