New Deal

The New DealHundred Days Congressfirst hundred daysHundred DaysJamie ShieldsNew Deal artFirst 100 DaysFirst New DealNewsocial programs
The New Deal was a series of programs, public work projects, financial reforms, and regulations enacted by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the United States between 1933 and 1939.wikipedia
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Civilian Conservation Corps

CCCCivil Conservation CorpsCivilian Conservation Corp
Major federal programs and agencies included the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), the Civil Works Administration (CWA), the Farm Security Administration (FSA), the National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933 (NIRA) and the Social Security Administration (SSA).
The CCC was a major part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal that provided manual labor jobs related to the conservation and development of natural resources in rural lands owned by federal, state, and local governments.

Farm Security Administration

FSAFarmers Home AdministrationResettlement/Farm Security Administration
Major federal programs and agencies included the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), the Civil Works Administration (CWA), the Farm Security Administration (FSA), the National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933 (NIRA) and the Social Security Administration (SSA).
The Farm Security Administration (FSA) was a New Deal agency created in 1937 to combat rural poverty during the Great Depression in the United States.

Great Depression in the United States

Great DepressionDepressionthe Depression
It responded to needs for relief, reform, and recovery from the Great Depression.
Roosevelt's economic recovery plan, the New Deal, instituted unprecedented programs for relief, recovery and reform, and brought about a major realignment of American politics, but offered no actual recovery from the Great Depression.

New Deal coalition

New DealNew Deal Democratscoalition
The realignment crystallized into the New Deal coalition that dominated presidential elections into the 1960s while the opposing conservative coalition largely controlled Congress in domestic affairs from 1937 to 1964.
The New Deal coalition was the alignment of interest groups and voting blocs in the United States that supported the New Deal and voted for Democratic presidential candidates from 1932 until the late 1960s.

Modern liberalism in the United States

liberalliberalsLiberalism
By 1936, the term "liberal" typically was used for supporters of the New Deal and "conservative" for its opponents.
Major examples include Theodore Roosevelt's New Nationalism, Woodrow Wilson's New Freedom, Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal, Harry S. Truman's Fair Deal, John F. Kennedy's New Frontier and Lyndon B. Johnson's Great Society.

Social Security Administration

Social Security BoardCommissioner of Social SecuritySocial Security
Major federal programs and agencies included the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), the Civil Works Administration (CWA), the Farm Security Administration (FSA), the National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933 (NIRA) and the Social Security Administration (SSA).
It was created as part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal with the signing of the Social Security Act of 1935 on August 14, 1935.

National Recovery Administration

NRABlue EagleBlue Eagle (National Recovery Administration)
The controversial work of the National Recovery Administration (NRA) was also part of the First New Deal.
The National Recovery Administration (NRA) was a prime New Deal agency established by U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt (FDR) in 1933.

Civil Works Administration

CWA
Major federal programs and agencies included the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), the Civil Works Administration (CWA), the Farm Security Administration (FSA), the National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933 (NIRA) and the Social Security Administration (SSA).
The Civil Works Administration (CWA) was a short-lived job creation program established by the New Deal during the Great Depression in the United States to rapidly create mostly manual-labor jobs for millions of unemployed workers.

Second New Deal

Many historians distinguish between a First New Deal (1933–1934) and a Second New Deal (1935–1936), with the second one more liberal and more controversial.
The Second New Deal is the term used by commentators at the time and historians ever since to characterize the second stage, 1935–36, of the New Deal programs of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Great Society

National Data BankThe Great SocietyCivil Rights Act
In the 1960s, Lyndon B. Johnson's Great Society used the New Deal as inspiration for a dramatic expansion of liberal programs, which Republican Richard Nixon generally retained.
The Great Society in scope and sweep resembled the New Deal domestic agenda of Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Puerto Rico Reconstruction Administration

Puerto Rico Emergency Relief Administration
The FSA was also one of the oversight authorities of the Puerto Rico Reconstruction Administration, which administered relief efforts to Puerto Rican citizens affected by the Great Depression.
The Puerto Rico Reconstruction Administration (PRRA) was one of the alphabet agencies of the New Deal established by the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Social Security Act

Social Security Act of 1935Social Security
The Second New Deal in 1935–1936 included the Wagner Act to protect labor organizing, the Works Progress Administration (WPA) relief program (which made the federal government by far the largest single employer in the nation), the Social Security Act and new programs to aid tenant farmers and migrant workers.
The law was part of Roosevelt's New Deal domestic program.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
The New Deal was a series of programs, public work projects, financial reforms, and regulations enacted by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the United States between 1933 and 1939.
After his election as president in 1932, Franklin D. Roosevelt responded with the New Deal, which included the establishment of the Social Security system.

Make-work job

make-workrelief projectmake-work" project
The Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA) provided $500 million ($ today) for relief operations by states and cities, while the short-lived CWA gave locals money to operate make-work projects in 1933–1934.
As a part of the New Deal, the Civil Works Administration (CWA) was in 1933 created as a stopgap measure to boost the economic relief provided by the Federal Emergency Relief Administration and Public Works Administration.

1933 Banking Act

Banking Act of 1933Glass–Steagall ActGlass-Steagall Act
The First New Deal (1933–1934) dealt with the pressing banking crises through the Emergency Banking Act and the 1933 Banking Act.
Although the 1933 Banking Act thus fulfilled Congressional designs and, at least in its deposit insurance provisions, was resisted by the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Administration, it later became considered part of the New Deal.

Dwight D. Eisenhower

Dwight EisenhowerEisenhowerPresident Eisenhower
Republican president Dwight D. Eisenhower (1953–1961) left the New Deal largely intact, even expanding it in some areas.
On the domestic front, Eisenhower was a moderate conservative who continued New Deal agencies and expanded Social Security.

Lyndon B. Johnson

Lyndon JohnsonJohnsonLyndon Baines Johnson
In the 1960s, Lyndon B. Johnson's Great Society used the New Deal as inspiration for a dramatic expansion of liberal programs, which Republican Richard Nixon generally retained.
Johnson's presidency marked the peak of modern liberalism after the New Deal era.

United States Housing Authority

Federal Public Housing AuthorityPublic Housing AdministrationUS Housing Authority
The final major items of New Deal legislation were the creation of the United States Housing Authority and the FSA, which both occurred in 1937; and the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, which set maximum hours and minimum wages for most categories of workers.
The United States Housing Authority, or USHA, was a federal agency created during 1937 within the United States Department of the Interior by the Housing Act of 1937 as part of the New Deal.

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
New Deal programs included both laws passed by Congress as well as presidential executive orders during the first term of the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt.
The Great Depression ushered in President Franklin Roosevelt and strong control by Democrats and historic New Deal policies.

Conservative coalition

coalitionconservative Congress
The realignment crystallized into the New Deal coalition that dominated presidential elections into the 1960s while the opposing conservative coalition largely controlled Congress in domestic affairs from 1937 to 1964.
Given his party's overwhelming majorities, FDR decided he could overcome opposition to his liberal New Deal policies by the conservative justices of the Supreme Court, which had struck down many New Deal agencies as unconstitutional.

Hugh S. Johnson

Hugh JohnsonHugh Samuel Johnson
Other leaders such as Hugh S. Johnson of the NRA took ideas from the Woodrow Wilson Administration, advocating techniques used to mobilize the economy for World War I.
He wrote numerous speeches for FDR and helped plan the New Deal.

Federal Emergency Relief Administration

FERAFederal Emergency Relief ActEmergency Relief Administration
The Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA) provided $500 million ($ today) for relief operations by states and cities, while the short-lived CWA gave locals money to operate make-work projects in 1933–1934.
Along with the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) it was the first relief operation under the New Deal.

Tennessee Valley Authority

TVATennessee Valley Authority (TVA)Tennessee Valley Authority Act
Several New Deal programs remain active and those operating under the original names include the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (FCIC), the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA).
The idea behind the Muscle Shoals Bill in 1933 became a core part of the New Deal's TVA.

Securities Act of 1933

Section 11Federal Securities ActSecurities Act
The Securities Act of 1933 was enacted to prevent a repeated stock market crash.
Part of the New Deal, the Act was drafted by Benjamin V. Cohen, Thomas Corcoran, and James M. Landis, and signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Socialist Party of America

SocialistSocialist PartySocial Democratic
The "First New Deal" (1933–1934) encompassed the proposals offered by a wide spectrum of groups (not included was the Socialist Party, whose influence was all but destroyed).
The party's appeal was weakened by the popularity of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal, the organization and flexibility of the Communist Party under Earl Browder and the resurgent labor movement's desire to support sympathetic Democratic Party politicians.