New Deal coalition

New DealNew Deal DemocratscoalitionDemocratic CoalitionFDR coalitionFranklin D. Roosevelt's Democratic ticketsNew Deal democratNew Deal liberalsNew DealerNew Dealers
The New Deal coalition was the alignment of interest groups and voting blocs in the United States that supported the New Deal and voted for Democratic presidential candidates from 1932 until the late 1960s.wikipedia
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Democratic Party (United States)

DemocraticDemocratDemocratic Party
The New Deal coalition was the alignment of interest groups and voting blocs in the United States that supported the New Deal and voted for Democratic presidential candidates from 1932 until the late 1960s.
Since Franklin D. Roosevelt and his New Deal coalition in the 1930s, the Democratic Party has promoted a social liberal platform.

New Deal

The New DealHundred Days Congressfirst hundred days
The New Deal coalition was the alignment of interest groups and voting blocs in the United States that supported the New Deal and voted for Democratic presidential candidates from 1932 until the late 1960s. Roosevelt set up his New Deal in 1933 and forged a coalition of labor unions, communists, socialists, liberals, religious, ethnic and racial minorities (Catholics, Jews and Blacks), Southern whites, poor people and those on relief.
The realignment crystallized into the New Deal coalition that dominated presidential elections into the 1960s while the opposing conservative coalition largely controlled Congress in domestic affairs from 1937 to 1964.

Labor history of the United States

American labor movementlabor movementAmerican labor history
Franklin D. Roosevelt forged a coalition that included the Democratic state party organizations, city machines, labor unions, blue collar workers, minorities (racial, ethnic, and religious), farmers, white Southerners, people on relief, and intellectuals.
Labor unions became a central element of the New Deal Coalition that dominated national politics from the 1930s into the mid-1960s during the Fifth Party System.

1968 United States presidential election

19681968 presidential election1968 election
The coalition began to fall apart with the bitter factionalism during the 1968 election, but it remains the model that party activists seek to replicate.
Analysts have argued the election of 1968 was a major realigning election as it permanently disrupted the New Deal Coalition that had dominated presidential politics for 36 years.

Realigning election

realignmentpolitical realignmentparty realignment
The 1932 presidential election and the 1934 Senate and House of Representatives elections brought about long-term shifts in voting behavior, and became an enduring realignment.

1932 United States presidential election

19321932 presidential election1932 election
The 1932 presidential election and the 1934 Senate and House of Representatives elections brought about long-term shifts in voting behavior, and became an enduring realignment.
Subsequent landslides in the 1934 mid-term elections and the 1936 presidential election confirmed the commencement of the Fifth Party System, which would be dominated by Roosevelt's New Deal Coalition.

Harry S. Truman

Harry TrumanTrumanHarry S Truman
Journalist Sidney Lubell found in his survey of voters after the 1948 presidential election that Democrat Harry Truman, not Republican Thomas E. Dewey, seemed the safer, more conservative candidate to the "new middle class" that had developed over the previous 20 years.
He rallied his New Deal coalition during the 1948 presidential election and won a surprise victory that secured his own presidential term.

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin Delano RooseveltFranklin RooseveltRoosevelt
Franklin D. Roosevelt forged a coalition that included the Democratic state party organizations, city machines, labor unions, blue collar workers, minorities (racial, ethnic, and religious), farmers, white Southerners, people on relief, and intellectuals.
As a dominant leader of his party, he built the New Deal Coalition, which realigned American politics into the Fifth Party System and defined American liberalism throughout the middle third of the 20th century.

Fifth Party System

Fifth
Political scientists called the new coalition they had created the "Fifth Party System" in contrast to the Fourth Party System of the 1896–1932 era that it replaced.
This era of Democratic Party dominance emerged from the realignment of the voting blocs and interest groups supporting the Democratic Party into the New Deal coalition following the Great Depression.

1936 United States presidential election

19361936 presidential election1936 election
Taxpayers, small business and the middle class voted for Roosevelt in 1936, but turned sharply against him after the recession of 1937-38 seemed to belie his promises of recovery.
The sweeping victory consolidated the New Deal Coalition in control of the Fifth Party System.

Fourth Party System

System of 1896an eraFourth
Political scientists called the new coalition they had created the "Fifth Party System" in contrast to the Fourth Party System of the 1896–1932 era that it replaced.
The Great Depression caused a realignment that produced the Fifth Party System, dominated by the Democratic New Deal Coalition until the 1960s.

Modern liberalism in the United States

liberalliberalsLiberalism
Roosevelt set up his New Deal in 1933 and forged a coalition of labor unions, communists, socialists, liberals, religious, ethnic and racial minorities (Catholics, Jews and Blacks), Southern whites, poor people and those on relief.
Anti-Communist liberals led by Walter Reuther and Hubert Humphrey expelled the far-left from labor unions and the New Deal coalition and committed the Democratic Party to a strong Cold War policy typified by NATO and the containment of Communism.

Lyndon B. Johnson

Lyndon JohnsonJohnsonLyndon Baines Johnson
The closest was perhaps Lyndon B. Johnson, who deliberately tried to reinvigorate the old coalition but in fact drove its constituents apart.
Nixon was elected to succeed him, as the New Deal coalition that had dominated presidential politics for 36 years collapsed.

Barry Goldwater

Barry M. GoldwaterGoldwaterBarry Morris Goldwater
Democrats had traditionally solid support in Southern states (which led the region to be dubbed the Solid South), but this electoral dominance began eroding in 1964, when Barry Goldwater achieved unprecedented GOP support in the Deep South; all of the states he won bar his homestate Arizona which had voted for Democrat John F. Kennedy in 1960. The white Southerners believed the support that northern Democrats gave to the Civil Rights Movement to be a direct political assault on their interests, which opened the way to protest votes for Barry Goldwater, who, in 1964, was the first Republican to carry the Deep South.
Goldwater rejected the legacy of the New Deal and fought with the conservative coalition against the New Deal coalition.

James Farley

James A. FarleyJim FarleyFarley's Follies
With Postmaster General James A. Farley and WPA administrator Harry Hopkins cutting deals with state and local Democratic officials, Roosevelt used federal discretionary spending, especially the Works Progress Administration (1935–1942) as a national political machine.
Farley's ability to gather the Catholics, unions, and big city machines, while maintaining the Solid South, into the New Deal Coalition greatly helped Roosevelt.

History of the United States Democratic Party

Democratic PartyDemocraticDemocrat
Starting with 32nd President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932 during the Great Depression, the party dominated the Fifth Party System, with its progressive liberal policies and programs with the New Deal coalition to combat the emergency bank closings and the continuing financial depression since the famous Wall Street Crash of 1929 and later going into the crises leading up to World War II.

1964 United States presidential election

19641964 presidential election1964 election
Democrats had traditionally solid support in Southern states (which led the region to be dubbed the Solid South), but this electoral dominance began eroding in 1964, when Barry Goldwater achieved unprecedented GOP support in the Deep South; all of the states he won bar his homestate Arizona which had voted for Democrat John F. Kennedy in 1960.
Moreover, his support of civil rights for blacks helped split white union members and Southerners away from Franklin Roosevelt' s Democratic New Deal Coalition, which would later lead to the phenomenon of the "Reagan Democrat".

Deep South

SouthLower SouthSouthern
The white Southerners believed the support that northern Democrats gave to the Civil Rights Movement to be a direct political assault on their interests, which opened the way to protest votes for Barry Goldwater, who, in 1964, was the first Republican to carry the Deep South.
During the Great Depression and the administration of Democrat Franklin D. Roosevelt, some New Deal measures were promoted as intending to aid African Americans across the country and in the poor rural South, as well as poor whites.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
The New Deal coalition was the alignment of interest groups and voting blocs in the United States that supported the New Deal and voted for Democratic presidential candidates from 1932 until the late 1960s.

Dwight D. Eisenhower

Dwight EisenhowerEisenhowerPresident Eisenhower
It made the Democratic Party the majority party during that period, losing only to Dwight D. Eisenhower, a pro-New Deal Republican and extremely popular war hero, in 1952 and 1956.

Political machine

machine politicsmachinepolitical boss
Franklin D. Roosevelt forged a coalition that included the Democratic state party organizations, city machines, labor unions, blue collar workers, minorities (racial, ethnic, and religious), farmers, white Southerners, people on relief, and intellectuals.

1934 United States Senate elections

1934run for U.S. SenatorRe-elected in 1934
The 1932 presidential election and the 1934 Senate and House of Representatives elections brought about long-term shifts in voting behavior, and became an enduring realignment.

1934 United States House of Representatives elections

1934Re-elected in 1934Elected in 1934
The 1932 presidential election and the 1934 Senate and House of Representatives elections brought about long-term shifts in voting behavior, and became an enduring realignment.

1948 United States presidential election

19481948 presidential election1948 election
Journalist Sidney Lubell found in his survey of voters after the 1948 presidential election that Democrat Harry Truman, not Republican Thomas E. Dewey, seemed the safer, more conservative candidate to the "new middle class" that had developed over the previous 20 years.