New Democratic Party

New DemocraticNDPNew DemocratNew Democratic Party of Canadafederal NDPNew Democrats(NDP)N.D.P.federal partyCanada
The New Democratic Party (NDP; Nouveau Parti démocratique, NPD) is a social-democratic The party is widely described as social democratic: * federal political party in Canada.wikipedia
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Jagmeet Singh

Jagmeet Singh DhaliwalSinghSINGH, Jagmeet Jimmy Dhaliwal
On October 1, 2017 Jagmeet Singh, the first person of a visible minority group to lead a major Canadian federal political party on a permanent basis, won the leadership vote to head the NDP on the first ballot.
Jagmeet Singh Jimmy Dhaliwal (born January 2, 1979), professionally known as Jagmeet Singh, is a Canadian lawyer and politician serving as leader of the New Democratic Party since 2017 and as the Member of Parliament (MP) for the riding of Burnaby South since 2019.

Liberal Party of Canada

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
Following the 2019 election the NDP hold the balance of power as the Liberals won a minority government, although the party lost 15 seats and fell back to fourth place behind the Bloc Québécois.
The party espouses the principles of liberalism, and generally sits at the centre to centre-left of the Canadian political spectrum, with the Conservative Party positioned to the centre-right and the New Democratic Party (who at times aligned itself with the Liberals during minority governments), occupying the left.

Jack Layton

her husbandJack Gilbert LaytonLayton, Jack
In the 2011 election under the leadership of Jack Layton, the NDP won the second most seats in the House, gaining the position of Official Opposition for the first time in the party's history.
He was leader of the New Democratic Party (NDP) from 2003 to 2011 and previously sat on Toronto City Council, occasionally holding the title of acting mayor or deputy mayor of Toronto during his tenure as city councillor.

Tommy Douglas

Thomas Clement DouglasT.C. DouglasThomas C. Douglas
In 1961, at the end of a five-day long Founding Convention which established its principles, policies and structures, the New Democratic Party was born and Tommy Douglas, the long-time CCF Premier of Saskatchewan, was elected its first leader.
Thomas Clement Douglas (20 October 1904 – 24 February 1986) was a Canadian politician who served as Premier of Saskatchewan from 1944 to 1961 and Leader of the New Democratic Party from 1961 to 1971.

2019 Canadian federal election

2019 federal election2019 election2019
Following the 2019 election the NDP hold the balance of power as the Liberals won a minority government, although the party lost 15 seats and fell back to fourth place behind the Bloc Québécois.
The New Democratic Party, led by Jagmeet Singh, won 24 seats, its worst result since 2004.

2017 New Democratic Party leadership election

20172017 leadership electionleadership
Consequently, his successor was to be chosen at a leadership election to be held no later than October 2017 (Mulcair agreed to remain as leader until then).

1993 Canadian federal election

1993 federal election1993 election1993
Following the 1993 election the NDP was reduced to fourth place behind the Bloc Québécois, a position it would maintain for the next 18 years.
The traditional third party, the NDP, collapsed to nine seats only one election after having what was then its best performance.

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation

Cooperative Commonwealth FederationCCFCo-operative Commonwealth
In 1956, after the birth of the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) by a merger of two previous labour congresses, negotiations began between the CLC and the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) to bring about an alliance between organized labour and the political left in Canada.
This party, initially known as the New Party, became the New Democratic Party (NDP) in 1961.

New Democratic Party of Quebec

New DemocratNew DemocraticNew Democratic Party
Nouveau Parti démocratique du Québec, although it is not affiliated to the federal NDP due to provincial laws in Quebec which disallow provincial parties from affiliating with federal parties.
The party is a revival of the comparable Nouveau Parti Démocratique du Québec, which existed in various forms as the federal New Democratic Party (NDP)'s provincial affiliate in Quebec from 1963 to 1991.

David Lewis (politician)

David LewisDavid Lewis (Losz)LEWIS, David
At the 1971 leadership convention, an activist group called The Waffle tried to take control of the party, but were defeated by David Lewis with the help of the union members.
He was national secretary of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) from 1936 to 1950, and one of the key architects of the New Democratic Party (NDP) in 1961.

2011 Canadian federal election

2011 federal election2011 election2011
In the 2011 election under the leadership of Jack Layton, the NDP won the second most seats in the House, gaining the position of Official Opposition for the first time in the party's history.
The New Democratic Party won the largest number of seats in its history, enabling it to form the Official Opposition for the first time.

2015 Canadian federal election

2015 federal election2015 election42nd Canadian federal election
The NDP subsequently lost 59 seats in the 2015 federal election and fell to third place in Parliament, though it is their second-best seat count to date.
The New Democratic Party, led by Thomas Mulcair, won 44 seats, becoming the third-largest party in the House of Commons, after having formed the Official Opposition following the 2011 election.

Politics of Canada

Canadian politicsfederal governmentCanadian politician
the New Democratic Party, the Quebec nationalist Bloc Québécois and the Green Party of Canada have also been able to exert their own influence over the political process.

The Waffle

Movement for an Independent Socialist CanadaWaffle
At the 1971 leadership convention, an activist group called The Waffle tried to take control of the party, but were defeated by David Lewis with the help of the union members.
The Waffle (also known as the Movement for an Independent Socialist Canada) was a radical wing of Canada's New Democratic Party (NDP) in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

1971 New Democratic Party leadership election

1971 leadership conventionApril 24, 19711971 NDP Federal Leadership Convention
At the 1971 leadership convention, an activist group called The Waffle tried to take control of the party, but were defeated by David Lewis with the help of the union members.
The 1971 New Democratic Party leadership election was a leadership convention held in Ottawa from April 21 to 24 to elect a leader of the New Democratic Party of Canada.

Ed Broadbent

BROADBENT, John Edward (Ed)Comrade EdEdward Broadbent
Under the leadership of Ed Broadbent (1975–1989), the NDP attempted to find a more populist image to contrast with the governing parties, focusing on more pocketbook issues than on ideological fervor.
He was leader of the New Democratic Party of Canada (NDP) from 1975 to 1989.

Bloc Québécois

Bloc QuebecoisBQBloc
Following the 1993 election the NDP was reduced to fourth place behind the Bloc Québécois, a position it would maintain for the next 18 years.
The 2011 election saw the party win just four seats and lose official party status after a wave of support for the New Democratic Party.

New Democratic Party leadership elections

leadership conventionparty's leadership convention1989 leadership convention
At the party's leadership convention in 1989, former B.C. Premier Dave Barrett and Yukon MP Audrey McLaughlin were the main contenders for the leadership.
New Democratic Party leadership elections, more commonly known as leadership conventions, are the process by which the Canadian New Democratic Party elects its leader.

Audrey McLaughlin

MCLAUGHLIN, Audrey Marlene
At the party's leadership convention in 1989, former B.C. Premier Dave Barrett and Yukon MP Audrey McLaughlin were the main contenders for the leadership.
Audrey Marlene McLaughlin (née Brown; born November 8, 1936) is a Canadian politician and former leader of the New Democratic Party from 1989 to 1995.

Parti de la Democratie Socialiste

Socialist DemocracyParti de la démocratie socialistePDS
In 1989, the New Democratic Party of Quebec adopted a sovereigntist platform and severed its ties with the federal NDP.
Founded as the New Democratic Party of Quebec [Nouveau Parti Démocratique du Québec (NPDQ)], the NPDQ was originally affiliated with the federal New Democratic Party (NDP) but separated from the NDP in 1989 before disaffiliating entirely in 1991.

Bob Rae

RaeBob Keith RaeRobert Keith Rae
The loss was blamed on the unpopularity of NDP provincial governments under Bob Rae in Ontario and Mike Harcourt in British Columbia and the loss of a significant portion of Western vote to the Reform Party, which promised a more decentralized and democratic federation along with right-wing economic reforms.
Rae was a New Democratic Party (NDP) member of Parliament from 1978 to 1982.

Petro-Canada

Petro CanadaPetroCanadaPetro-Canada Mobility
Together they succeeded in passing several socially progressive initiatives into law such as pension indexing and the creation of the crown corporation Petro-Canada.
The government of Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau and the opposition New Democratic Party felt that these corporations geared most of their production to the American market, and as a result little of the benefit of rising oil prices went to Canadians.

Nova Scotia New Democratic Party

New Democratic PartyNew DemocraticNDP
McLaughlin resigned in 1995 and was succeeded by Alexa McDonough, the former leader of the Nova Scotia NDP.
It is the provincial entity of the federal New Democratic Party (NDP).

Alexa McDonough

McLaughlin resigned in 1995 and was succeeded by Alexa McDonough, the former leader of the Nova Scotia NDP.
She subsequently ran for, and was elected, leader of the federal New Democratic Party (NDP) in 1995.

1974 Canadian federal election

19741974 federal election1974 election
In 1974, the NDP worked with the Progressive Conservatives to pass a motion of non-confidence, forcing an election.
They were able to form a government with the support of the New Democratic Party, but the NDP withdrew their backing in May 1974 and voted with the Progressive Conservatives to bring down Trudeau's government in protest of a budget proposed by finance minister John Turner, which the opposition parties felt did not go far enough to control spiralling inflation.