New England

Southern New EnglandNorthern New EnglandNew England regiontownNew EnglanderNew England ColoniesNew England statesnortheastEnglishNortheastern
New England is a region composed of six states in the northeastern United States: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.wikipedia
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Maine

MEState of MaineMaine, United States
New England is a region composed of six states in the northeastern United States: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.
Maine is the northernmost state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

Vermont

VTState of VermontGeography of Vermont
New England is a region composed of six states in the northeastern United States: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.
Vermont is a U.S. state in the New England region.

New Hampshire

NHState of New HampshireNew Hampshire, U.S.
New England is a region composed of six states in the northeastern United States: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.
New Hampshire is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

Massachusetts

MACommonwealth of MassachusettsMass.
New England is a region composed of six states in the northeastern United States: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.
Massachusetts, officially known as the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

Boston

Boston, MassachusettsBoston, MABoston, United States
Boston is New England's largest city, as well as the capital of Massachusetts.
The city proper covers 48 mi2 with an estimated population of 694,583 in 2018, making it also the most populous city in New England.

Manchester, New Hampshire

ManchesterManchester, NHDerryfield
Greater Boston is the largest metropolitan area, with nearly a third of New England's population; this area includes Worcester, Massachusetts (the second-largest city in New England), Manchester, New Hampshire (the largest city in New Hampshire), and Providence, Rhode Island (the capital and largest city of Rhode Island).
It is the most populous city in northern New England, an area comprising the states of Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont.

Worcester, Massachusetts

WorcesterWorcester, MAWorcester, Mass.
Greater Boston is the largest metropolitan area, with nearly a third of New England's population; this area includes Worcester, Massachusetts (the second-largest city in New England), Manchester, New Hampshire (the largest city in New Hampshire), and Providence, Rhode Island (the capital and largest city of Rhode Island).
Named after Worcester, England, as of the 2010 Census the city's population was 181,045, making it the second-most populous city in New England after Boston.

Massachusetts Bay Colony

MassachusettsMassachusetts Bay CompanyMassachusetts Bay
Ten years later, more Puritans established Massachusetts Bay Colony north of Plymouth Colony.
The lands of the settlement were located in southern New England, with initial settlements situated on two natural harbors and surrounding land about 15.4 mi apart—the areas around Salem and Boston.

Providence, Rhode Island

ProvidenceProvidence, RIProvidence, R.I.
Greater Boston is the largest metropolitan area, with nearly a third of New England's population; this area includes Worcester, Massachusetts (the second-largest city in New England), Manchester, New Hampshire (the largest city in New Hampshire), and Providence, Rhode Island (the capital and largest city of Rhode Island).
The city is the third most populous city in New England after Boston and Worcester, Massachusetts.

Plymouth Colony

PlymouthPlymouth PlantationColony of New-Plimouth
In 1620, Puritan Separatist Pilgrims from England established Plymouth Colony, the second successful English settlement in America, following the Jamestown Settlement in Virginia founded in 1607.
It was the second successful colony to be founded by the English in America after Jamestown in Virginia, and it was the first permanent English settlement in the New England region.

List of regions of the United States

Regionregions of the United StatesCensus Bureau Division
New England is one of the Census Bureau's [[List of regions of the United States#Census Bureau-designated regions and divisions|nine regional divisions]] and the only multi-state region with clear, consistent boundaries.

Connecticut

CTState of ConnecticutConn.
New England is a region composed of six states in the northeastern United States: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.
Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

Merrimack Valley

Merrimack River ValleyGolden TriangleGolden Triangle (New Hampshire)
The region played a prominent role in the movement to abolish slavery in the United States, and it was the first region of the U.S. transformed by the Industrial Revolution, centered on the Blackstone and Merrimack river valleys.
The Merrimack is one of the larger waterways in the New England region and has helped define the livelihood and culture of those living along it since native times.

Connecticut River

Connecticut River ValleyConnecticutUpper Valley
The Atlantic fall line lies close to the coast, which enabled numerous cities to take advantage of water power along the many rivers, such as the Connecticut River, which bisects the region from north to south.
The Connecticut River is the longest river in the New England region of the United States, flowing roughly southward for 406 mi through four states.

Abenaki

Abenaki peopleAbenakisAbnaki
Prominent tribes included the Abenakis, Mi'kmaq, Penobscot, Pequots, Mohegans, Narragansetts, Pocumtucks, and Wampanoag.
The Abenaki originate in what is now called Quebec and the Maritimes of Canada and in the New England region of the United States, a region called Wabanahkik ("Dawn Land") in the Eastern Algonquian languages.

John Smith (explorer)

John SmithCaptain John SmithJohn Smith of Jamestown
In 1616, English explorer John Smith named the region "New England".
6 January 1580 – 21 June 1631) was an English soldier, explorer, colonial governor, Admiral of New England, and author.

Algonquian peoples

AlgonquianAlgonquinAlgonquians
Over the next 126 years, people in the region fought in four French and Indian Wars, until the English colonists and their Iroquois allies defeated the French and their Algonquian allies in America.
The Algonquians of New England (who spoke Eastern Algonquian) practiced a seasonal economy.

New York (state)

New YorkNew York StateNY
It is bordered by the state of New York to the west and by the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick to the northeast and Quebec to the north.
Many of the Wampanoag and Mohican peoples were caught up in King Philip's War, a joint effort of many New England tribes to push Europeans off their land.

King Philip's War

King Phillips WarKing Philip’s WarKing Philips War
The confederation was designed largely to coordinate mutual defense, and it gained some importance during King Philip's War which pitted the colonists and their Indian allies against a widespread Indian uprising from June 1675 through April 1678, resulting in killings and massacres on both sides.
King Philip's War (sometimes called the First Indian War, Metacom's War, Metacomet's War, Pometacomet's Rebellion, or Metacom's Rebellion) was an armed conflict in 1675–1678 between Indian inhabitants of New England and New England colonists and their Indian allies.

Northeastern United States

NortheastNortheasternNortheast United States
New England is a region composed of six states in the northeastern United States: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.
The region is often subdivided into New England (the six states east of New York) and the Mid-Atlantic states (New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania).

Dominion of New England

Dominion of New-England in AmericaNew EnglandDominion
He therefore established the Dominion of New England, an administrative union comprising all of the New England colonies.
The Dominion of New England in America (1686–89) was an administrative union of English colonies covering New England and the Mid-Atlantic Colonies (except for the Colony of Pennsylvania).

Siege of Boston

besieged Bostonevacuation of Bostonbesieged in Boston
The first battles of the war were fought in Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts, later leading to the Siege of Boston by continental troops.
New England militiamen prevented the movement by land of the British Army, which was garrisoned in what was then the peninsular city of Boston, Massachusetts Bay.

New England Confederation

United Colonies of New EnglandUnited Coloniesa confederation
On May 19, 1643, the colonies of Massachusetts Bay, Plymouth, New Haven, and Connecticut joined together in a loose compact called the New England Confederation (officially "The United Colonies of New England").
The United Colonies of New England, commonly known as the New England Confederation, was a short-lived military alliance of the New England colonies of Massachusetts Bay, Plymouth, Connecticut, and New Haven formed in May 1643.

Hartford Convention

discreditedconventionsecession
As the United States and the United Kingdom fought the War of 1812, New England Federalists organized the Hartford Convention in the winter of 1814 to discuss the region's grievances concerning the war, and to propose changes to the Constitution to protect the region's interests and maintain its political power.
The Hartford Convention was a series of meetings from December 15, 1814 to January 5, 1815, in Hartford, Connecticut, United States, in which the New England Federalist Party met to discuss their grievances concerning the ongoing War of 1812 and the political problems arising from the federal government's increasing power.

Wampanoag

Wampanoag peopleWampanoagsWampanoag Tribe
Prominent tribes included the Abenakis, Mi'kmaq, Penobscot, Pequots, Mohegans, Narragansetts, Pocumtucks, and Wampanoag.
Many male Wampanoag were sold into slavery in Bermuda or the West Indies, and some women and children were enslaved by colonists in New England.