New France

FrenchCanadaNouvelle-FranceNouvelle FranceCanada (New France)French CanadaFrench North AmericaFrench colonialFrench Regimecolonial
New France (Nouvelle-France), also sometimes known as the French North American Empire or Royal New France, was the area colonized by France in America, beginning with the exploration of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence by Jacques Cartier in 1534 and ending with the cession of New France to Great Britain and Spain in 1763 under the Treaty of Paris (1763).wikipedia
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Acadia

Acadiel'AcadieHistory of Acadia
The territory of New France consisted of five colonies at its peak in 1712, each with its own administration: Canada, the most developed colony and divided into the districts of Québec, Trois-Rivières, and Montréal; Hudson's Bay; Acadie in the northeast; Plaisance on the island of Newfoundland; and Louisiane.
Acadia (Acadie) was a colony of New France in northeastern North America which included parts of eastern Quebec, the Maritime provinces, and Maine to the Kennebec River.

Louisiana (New France)

LouisianaFrench LouisianaLa Louisiane
The territory of New France consisted of five colonies at its peak in 1712, each with its own administration: Canada, the most developed colony and divided into the districts of Québec, Trois-Rivières, and Montréal; Hudson's Bay; Acadie in the northeast; Plaisance on the island of Newfoundland; and Louisiane.
Louisiana (La Louisiane; La Louisiane française) or French Louisiana was an administrative district of New France.

Quebec City

QuebecQuebec City, QuebecQuébec City
The territory of New France consisted of five colonies at its peak in 1712, each with its own administration: Canada, the most developed colony and divided into the districts of Québec, Trois-Rivières, and Montréal; Hudson's Bay; Acadie in the northeast; Plaisance on the island of Newfoundland; and Louisiane. In 1608, King Henry IV sponsored Pierre Dugua, Sieur de Mons and Samuel de Champlain as founders of the city of Quebec with 28 men.
Champlain, also called "The Father of New France", served as its administrator for the rest of his life.

Expulsion of the Acadians

Great UpheavalGreat ExpulsionAcadian Expulsion
The British expelled the Acadians in the Great Upheaval from 1755 to 1764, which has been remembered on July 28 each year since 2003.
The Expulsion (1755–1764) occurred during the French and Indian War (the North American theatre of the Seven Years' War) and was part of the British military campaign against New France.

French and Indian War

French & Indian WarFrench and IndianSeven Years' War
In 1763, France ceded the rest of New France to Great Britain and Spain, except the islands of Saint Pierre and Miquelon, at the Treaty of Paris which ended the Seven Years' War, part of which included the French and Indian War in America.
The French and Indian War (1754–1763) pitted the colonies of British America against those of New France, each side supported by military units from the parent country and by American Indian allies.

Saint Pierre and Miquelon

Saint-Pierre and MiquelonSt. Pierre and MiquelonSaint-Pierre-et-Miquelon
In 1763, France ceded the rest of New France to Great Britain and Spain, except the islands of Saint Pierre and Miquelon, at the Treaty of Paris which ended the Seven Years' War, part of which included the French and Indian War in America.
It is the only part of New France that remains under French control, with an area of 242 km2 and a population of 6,080 at the March 2016 census.

List of place names of French origin in the United States

List of U.S. place names of French origininfluencing the choice of the namenumerous placenames
In the United States, the legacy of New France includes numerous placenames as well as small pockets of French-speaking communities.
Several thousand place names in the United States have names of French origin, some a legacy of past French exploration and rule over much of the land and some in honor of French help during the American Revolution and the founding of the country (see also: New France and French in the United States).

Mississippi River

MississippiMississippi ValleyMississippi Basin
Britain received Canada, Acadia, and the parts of French Louisiana which lay east of the Mississippi River, except for the Île d'Orléans, which was granted to Spain with the territory to the west.
The river served first as a barrier, forming borders for New Spain, New France, and the early United States, and then as a vital transportation artery and communications link.

Acadians

AcadianAcadian settlersFrench
Their descendants are dispersed in the Maritime Provinces of Canada and in Maine and Louisiana, with small populations in Chéticamp, Nova Scotia and the Magdalen Islands.
Acadia was a distinctly separate colony of New France.

Seven Years' War

Seven Years’ WarSeven Years WarThe Seven Years' War
In 1763, France ceded the rest of New France to Great Britain and Spain, except the islands of Saint Pierre and Miquelon, at the Treaty of Paris which ended the Seven Years' War, part of which included the French and Indian War in America.
The war was successful for Great Britain, which gained the bulk of New France in North America, Spanish Florida, some individual Caribbean islands in the West Indies, the colony of Senegal on the West African coast, and superiority over the French trading outposts on the Indian subcontinent.

Cape Breton Island

Cape BretonCape Breton, Nova ScotiaC'''ape Breton Island
France established the colony of Île Royale, now called Cape Breton Island, where they built the Fortress of Louisbourg.
Île Royale remained formally part of New France until it was ceded to Great Britain by the Treaty of Paris in 1763.

Samuel de Champlain

ChamplainSamuel ChamplainChamplain Monument
In 1608, King Henry IV sponsored Pierre Dugua, Sieur de Mons and Samuel de Champlain as founders of the city of Quebec with 28 men.
He made between 21 and 29 trips across the Atlantic Ocean, and founded Quebec, and New France, on 3 July 1608.

Canada (New France)

CanadaColony of CanadaNew France
The territory of New France consisted of five colonies at its peak in 1712, each with its own administration: Canada, the most developed colony and divided into the districts of Québec, Trois-Rivières, and Montréal; Hudson's Bay; Acadie in the northeast; Plaisance on the island of Newfoundland; and Louisiane.
Canada, in this historical context (as distinct from the present day country of Canada), was a French colony within New France first claimed in the name of the King of France in 1535 during the second voyage of Jacques Cartier.

Coureur des bois

coureurs des boisvoyageurcoureurs de bois
These coureurs des bois ("runners of the woods"), such as Étienne Brûlé, extended French influence south and west to the Great Lakes and among the Huron tribes who lived there.
A coureur des bois or coureur de bois (plural: coureurs de(s) bois) was an independent entrepreneurial French-Canadian trader who traveled in New France and the interior of North America, usually to trade with First Nations peoples by exchanging various European items for furs.

Seigneurial system of New France

seigneurseigneuryseigneurial system
Richelieu also introduced the seigneurial system, a semi-feudal system of farming that remained a characteristic feature of the St. Lawrence valley until the 19th century.
The manorial system of New France was the semi-feudal system of land tenure used in the North American French colonial empire.

Jacques Cartier

CartierCartier, JacquesFrench navigator and explorer
New France (Nouvelle-France), also sometimes known as the French North American Empire or Royal New France, was the area colonized by France in America, beginning with the exploration of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence by Jacques Cartier in 1534 and ending with the cession of New France to Great Britain and Spain in 1763 under the Treaty of Paris (1763).
His explorations consolidated France's claim of the territory that would later be colonized as New France, and his third voyage produced the first documented European attempt at settling North America since that of Lucas Vázquez de Ayllón in 1526–27.

Adam Dollard des Ormeaux

Dollard des OrmeauxAdam Dollard, Sieur des OrmeauxDollard
In 1660, settler Adam Dollard des Ormeaux led a Canadian and Huron militia against a much larger Iroquois force; none of the Canadians survived, but they succeeded in turning back the Iroquois invasion.
Adam Dollard des Ormeaux (July 23, 1635 – May 21, 1660) is an iconic figure in the history of New France.

Trois-Rivières

Trois-Rivières, QuebecTrois-RivieresThree Rivers
The territory of New France consisted of five colonies at its peak in 1712, each with its own administration: Canada, the most developed colony and divided into the districts of Québec, Trois-Rivières, and Montréal; Hudson's Bay; Acadie in the northeast; Plaisance on the island of Newfoundland; and Louisiane.
The settlement was founded by French colonists on July 4, 1634, as the second permanent settlement in New France, after Quebec City in 1608.

Cardinal Richelieu

RichelieuCardinal de RichelieuArmand Jean du Plessis de Richelieu
Cardinal Richelieu, adviser to Louis XIII, wished to make New France as significant as the English colonies.
As an advocate for Samuel de Champlain and of the retention of New France, he founded the Compagnie des Cent-Associés and saw the Treaty of Saint-Germain-en-Laye return Quebec City to French rule under Champlain, after the settlement had been taken by the Kirkes in 1629.

Dieppe

Dieppe, Seine-MaritimeDieppe, FranceDieppe (Seine-Maritime)
Late that year, Verrazzano set sail in Dieppe, crossing the Atlantic on a small caravel with 50 men.
On July 23, 1632, 300 colonists heading to New France departed from Dieppe.

French colonial empire

FrenchFrench EmpireFrance
To strengthen the colony and make it the centre of France's colonial empire, Louis XIV decided to send single women, aged between 15 and 30 known as the King's Daughters or in French, les filles du roi, to New France, paying for their passage and granting goods or money as a dowry.
France began to establish colonies in North America, the Caribbean and India in the 17th century.

Governor of New France

governorGovernor-General of New FranceGovernors of New France
Champlain was named Governor of New France and Richelieu forbade non-Roman Catholics from living there.
A French noble, he was appointed to govern the colonies of New France, which included Canada, Acadia and Louisiana.

King's Daughters

filles du roiFilles du RoyFilles de Roy
To strengthen the colony and make it the centre of France's colonial empire, Louis XIV decided to send single women, aged between 15 and 30 known as the King's Daughters or in French, les filles du roi, to New France, paying for their passage and granting goods or money as a dowry.
The King's Daughters (filles du roi; filles du roy) is a term used to refer to the approximately 800 young French women who immigrated to New France between 1663 and 1673 as part of a program sponsored by King Louis XIV of France.

Illinois Country

Upper LouisianaPays des IllinoisIllinois
Other parts of Louisiana were settled and developed with success, such as New Orleans and southern Illinois, leaving a strong French influence in these areas long after the Louisiana Purchase.
The Illinois Country (Pays des Illinois ;, i.e. the Illinois people) — sometimes referred to as Upper Louisiana (la Haute-Louisiane ; Alta Luisiana) — was a vast region of New France in what is now the Midwestern United States.

First Nations

First NationNorth American IndianIndian
French fishing fleets continued to sail to the Atlantic coast and into the St. Lawrence River, making alliances with Canadian First Nations that became important once France began to occupy the land.
New France had cod-fishery coastal communities, and farm economies supported communities along the St. Lawrence River.