A report on New Hampshire and Vermont

The historical coat of arms of New Hampshire, from 1876
The Old Constitution House at Windsor, where the Constitution of Vermont was adopted on July 8, 1777
Site of first house in New Hampshire, present mansion constructed in 1750, by Gov. W. B. Wentworth, New York Public Library
A circa 1775 flag used by the Green Mountain Boys
Fort William and Mary in 1705
The gold leaf dome of the neoclassical Vermont State House (Capitol) in Montpelier
1922 map of New Hampshire published in the bulletin of the Brown Company in Berlin
1791 Act of Congress admitting Vermont into the Union
Köppen climate types of New Hampshire, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Vermont in 1827. The county boundaries have since changed.
Map of New Hampshire, with roads, rivers, and major cities
Map of Vermont showing cities, roads, and rivers
Shaded relief map of New Hampshire
Population density of Vermont
Mount Adams (5774 ft) is part of New Hampshire's Presidential Range.
Mount Mansfield
Lake Winnipesaukee and the Ossipee Mountains
Western face of Camel's Hump Mountain (elevation 4079 ft).
Autumn leaves on many hardwood trees in New Hampshire turn colors, attracting many tourists
Fall foliage at Lake Willoughby
Downtown Manchester
Köppen climate types of Vermont, using 1991–2020 climate normals.
Main Street, Nashua
Silurian and Devonian stratigraphy of Vermont
The hermit thrush, the state bird of Vermont
Largest reported ancestry groups in New Hampshire by town as of 2013. Dark purple indicates Irish, light purple English, pink French, turquoise French Canadian, dark blue Italian, and light blue German. Gray indicates townships with no reported data.
A proportional representation of Vermont exports, 2020
Farmers' market of Mack's Apples
Fall foliage seen from Hogback Mountain, Wilmington
The New Hampshire State House in Concord
Lake Champlain
Saint Anselm College has held several national debates on campus.
Autumn in Vermont
Dartmouth College before a debate in 2008
Stowe Resort Village
Manchester–Boston Regional Airport from the air
The Lyndon Institute, a high school in Lyndon, Vermont
Dartmouth College's Baker Library
The University of Vermont
Old Mill, the oldest building of the university
Thompson Hall, at UNH, was built in 1892.
Vermont welcome sign in Addison on Route 17 just over the New York border over the Champlain Bridge
Amtrak station in White River Junction
The Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant, in Vernon
The Vermont Supreme Court's building in Montpelier
Vermont towns hold a March town meeting for voters to approve the town's budget and decide other matters. Marlboro voters meet in this building.
Senators Bernie Sanders and Patrick Leahy and Representative Peter Welch greet supporters in 2017.
Vermontasaurus sculpture in Post Mills, in 2010

It is bordered by Massachusetts to the south, Vermont to the west, Maine and the Gulf of Maine to the east, and the Canadian province of Quebec to the north.

- New Hampshire

It borders the states of Massachusetts to the south, New Hampshire to the east, and New York to the west, and the Canadian province of Quebec to the north.

- Vermont

23 related topics with Alpha

Overall

New England

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Indigenous territories, circa 1600 in present-day southern New England
Soldier and explorer John Smith coined the name "New England" in 1616.
A 1638 engraving depicting the Mystic massacre
An English map of New England c. 1670 depicts the area around modern Portsmouth, New Hampshire.
The New England Ensign, one of several flags historically associated with New England. This flag was reportedly used by colonial merchant ships sailing out of New England ports, 1686 – c. 1737.
New England's Siege of Louisbourg (1745) by Peter Monamy
The Slater Mill Historic Site in Pawtucket, Rhode Island
Bread and Roses Strike. Massachusetts National Guard troops surround unarmed strikers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 1912.
Autumn in New England, watercolor, Maurice Prendergast, c.1910–1913
Cambridge, Massachusetts, has a high concentration of startups and technology companies.
A political and geographical map of New England shows the coastal plains in the southeast, and hills, mountains and valleys in the west and the north.
A portion of the north-central Pioneer Valley in Sunderland, Massachusetts
Köppen climate types in New England
The White Mountains of New Hampshire are part of the Appalachian Mountains.
500px
Montpelier, Vermont, is the smallest state capital in the United States.
Largest self-reported ancestry groups in New England. Americans of Irish descent form a plurality in most of Massachusetts, while Americans of English descent form a plurality in much of the central parts of Vermont and New Hampshire as well as nearly all of Maine.
World's largest Irish flag in Boston. People who claim Irish descent constitute the largest ethnic group in New England.
Southeastern New England is home to a number of Lusophone ethnic enclaves.
The Port of Portland in Portland, Maine, is the largest tonnage seaport in New England.
The Hartford headquarters of Aetna is housed in a 1931 Colonial Revival building.
A plowed field in Bethel, Vermont
Seabrook Station Nuclear Power Plant in Seabrook, New Hampshire
A New England town meeting in Huntington, Vermont
Flag of the New England Governor's Conference (NEGC)
Alumni Hall at Saint Anselm College has served as a backdrop for media reports during the New Hampshire primary.
New England is home to four of the eight Ivy League universities. Pictured here is Harvard Yard of Harvard University.
Phillips Exeter Academy and Phillips Academy are two prestigious New England secondary schools founded in the late 18th century
Flag of New England flying in Massachusetts. New Englanders maintain a strong sense of regional and cultural identity.
A classic New England Congregational church in Peacham, Vermont
Boston's Symphony Hall is the home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra—the second-oldest of the Big Five American symphony orchestras.
New England regionalist poet Robert Frost
Wes Anderson's Moonrise Kingdom is set on a fictional New England island and was largely filmed in Rhode Island
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
A Hartford Line Train at Hartford Union Station
The MBTA Commuter Rail serves eastern Massachusetts and parts of Rhode Island, radiating from downtown Boston, with planned service to New Hampshire. The CTrail system operates the Shore Line East and Hartford Line, covering coastal Connecticut, Hartford, and Springfield, Massachusetts.
1. Boston, Massachusetts
2. Worcester, Massachusetts
3. Providence, Rhode Island
4. Springfield, Massachusetts
5. Bridgeport, Connecticut
6. Stamford, Connecticut
7. New Haven, Connecticut
8. Hartford, Connecticut
9. Cambridge, Massachusetts
10. Manchester, New Hampshire
Harvard vs. Yale football game in 2003
Fenway Park
Bill Russell and Red Auerbach of the Boston Celtics
The New England Patriots are the most popular professional sports team in New England.
The Middlebury College rowing team in the 2007 Head of the Charles Regatta
Köppen climate types in New England

New England is a region comprising six states in the Northeastern United States: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

Maine

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Maine State House, designed by Charles Bulfinch, built 1829–1832
Misty Morning, Coast of MaineArthur Parton (1842–1914). Between 1865 and 1870, Brooklyn Museum.
A map of Maine and surrounding regions
The Maine coast and Portland Head Light
Rocky shoreline in Acadia National Park
Autumn in the Hundred-Mile Wilderness
Köppen climate types of Maine, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Winter in Bangor
Maine population density map
Bath Iron Works naval shipbuilding
Lobstering in Portland
Maine blueberries. The U.S.'s only commercial producers of wild blueberries are located in Maine.
Portland International Jetport
The Penobscot Narrows Bridge, carrying U.S. Route 1 and Maine State Route 3 over the Penobscot River
A southbound Downeaster passenger train at Ocean Park, Maine, as viewed from the cab of a northbound train
Treemap of the popular vote by county, 2016 presidential election
The University of Maine is the state's only research university.
Colby, Bates, and Bowdoin (pictured) Colleges form the Colby-Bates-Bowdoin Consortium
College hockey being played at the Cross Insurance Center
Two moose in the Aroostook National Wildlife Refuge. The moose is Maine's state mammal.
1. Portland
2. Lewiston
3. Bangor
4. South Portland
5. Auburn
6. Biddeford
7. Sanford
8. Brunswick
9. Saco
10. Scarborough
11. Westbrook
12. Augusta
Party registration by county: (November 2020)

Maine is a state in the New England region of the United States, bordered by New Hampshire to the west; the Gulf of Maine to the southeast; and the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Quebec to the northeast and northwest, respectively.

Maine's Moosehead Lake is the largest lake wholly in New England, since Lake Champlain is located between Vermont, New York and Québec.

Massachusetts

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Most populous state in the New England region of the United States.

Most populous state in the New England region of the United States.

The Mayflower in Plymouth Harbor by William Halsall (1882). The Pilgrims founded Plymouth in 1620.
An illustration of the Battles of Lexington and Concord
John Adams, 2nd President of the United States (1797–1801)
Textile mills such as the one in Lowell made Massachusetts a leader in the Industrial Revolution.
John F. Kennedy, Massachusetts native and 35th President of the United States (1961–1963)
Boston Marathon bombing
A portion of the north-central Pioneer Valley in South Deerfield
Köppen climate types in Massachusetts
Massachusetts population density map. The centers of high-density settlement, from east to west, are Boston, Worcester, Springfield, and Pittsfield, respectively.
Saint Patrick's Day parade in Scituate, the municipality with the highest percentage identifying Irish ancestry in the United States, at 47.5% in 2010. Irish Americans constitute the largest ethnicity in Massachusetts.
Boston's Chinatown, with its paifang gate, is home to many Chinese and also Vietnamese restaurants.
Boston gay pride march, held annually in June. In 2004 Massachusetts became the first U.S. state to legalize same-sex marriage.
Built in 1681, the Old Ship Church in Hingham is the oldest church in America in continuous ecclesiastical use. Massachusetts has since become one of the most irreligious states in the U.S.
Towns in Massachusetts by combined mean SAT of their public high school district for the 2015–2016 academic year
Sunset at Brewster, on Cape Cod Bay.
The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, serving Greater Boston
Logan International Airport in Boston is the largest airport in New England in terms of passenger volume
Prominent roads and cities in Massachusetts
The Massachusetts State House, topped by its golden dome, faces Boston Common on Beacon Hill.
Charlie Baker (R), the 72nd Governor of Massachusetts
Boston Pride Parade, 2012. From left: Representative Joe Kennedy III, Senator Elizabeth Warren, and former representative Barney Frank.
The site of Henry David Thoreau's cabin at Walden Pond in Concord
Massachusetts has the largest population of the New England states. New Englander culture and identity remains strong in Massachusetts (Flag of New England pictured above).
An outdoor dance performance at Jacob's Pillow in Becket
USS Constitution fires a salute during its annual Fourth of July turnaround cruise
Map showing the average medicare reimbursement per enrollee for the counties in Massachusetts.
Gillette Stadium in Foxborough is the home venue for the New England Patriots (NFL) and the New England Revolution (MLS)
Koppen climate of Massachusetts
A 1779 five-shilling note issued by Massachusetts.
Koppen climate of Massachusetts

It borders on the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Maine to the east, Connecticut and Rhode Island to the south, New Hampshire and Vermont to the north and New York to the west.

<center>Western Abenaki (Arsigantegok, Missisquoi, Cowasuck, Sokoki, Pennacook)</center>

Abenaki

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Indigenous peoples of the Northeastern Woodlands of Canada and the United States.

Indigenous peoples of the Northeastern Woodlands of Canada and the United States.

<center>Western Abenaki (Arsigantegok, Missisquoi, Cowasuck, Sokoki, Pennacook)</center>
<center>Eastern Abenaki (Penobscot, Kennebec, Arosaguntacook, Pigwacket/Pequawket)</center>
Abenaki teepee with birch bark covering.
Flag of Missisquoi Abenaki Tribe, a state-recognized tribe in Vermont
Statue of Keewakwa Abenaki Keenahbeh in Opechee Park in Laconia, New Hampshire (standing at 36 ft.)
<center>Miꞌkmaq</center>
<center>Maliseet,

The Eastern Abenaki language was predominantly spoken in Maine, while the Western Abenaki language was spoken in Quebec, Vermont, and New Hampshire.

Connecticut River

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Longest river in the New England region of the United States, flowing roughly southward for 406 mi through four states.

Longest river in the New England region of the United States, flowing roughly southward for 406 mi through four states.

View of Springfield on the Connecticut River by Alvan Fisher (Brooklyn Museum)
View of the City of Hartford, Connecticut by William Havell
View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm—The Oxbow (1836) by Thomas Cole
The Memorial Bridge across the Connecticut River at Springfield, Massachusetts, the river's largest city
The Windsor Locks Canal Company at Enfield Falls, the Connecticut River's first major barrier to navigation
The Oxbow, Connecticut River, circa 1910
Downtown Hartford, Connecticut, during the 1936 flood
The Connecticut Lakes, the source of the Connecticut River, near the border of New Hampshire and Quebec
Great Falls (Bellows Falls) at high flow under the Vilas Bridge, taken from the end of Bridge St on the Vermont side, looking upriver
Satellite image of the Connecticut River depositing silt into Long Island Sound
Drift boat fishing guide working the river near Colebrook, New Hampshire
Harbor seal in the Connecticut River, below the Holyoke Dam, following the shad run
Riverbank restoration project in Fairlee, Vermont
Near First Connecticut Lake
Near Colebrook, New Hampshire
Looking north from the French King Bridge at the Erving-Gill town line in western Massachusetts
Mist upstream of the Bissell Bridge between Windsor and South Windsor, CT
Founders Bridge in Hartford, with a view of the Bulkeley Bridge upstream
The river near its mouth

The region stretching from Springfield north to the New Hampshire and Vermont state borders fostered many agricultural Pocomtuc and Nipmuc settlements, with its soil enhanced by sedimentary deposits.

Wabanaki Confederacy

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North American First Nations and Native American confederation of four principal Eastern Algonquian nations: the Miꞌkmaq, Maliseet (Wolastoqey), Passamaquoddy (Peskotomahkati) and Penobscot.

North American First Nations and Native American confederation of four principal Eastern Algonquian nations: the Miꞌkmaq, Maliseet (Wolastoqey), Passamaquoddy (Peskotomahkati) and Penobscot.

Yellow - Miꞌkmaꞌki, Orange - Wolastokuk, Red - Peskotomuhkatik, Brown - Pαnawαhpskewahki, Cayenne - Ndakinna

The dots are the listed capitals, being political centers in Wabanaki.

The mixed region is territory outside of the historic ranges of the five tribes. It was acquired from the St.Lawrence Iroquois between 1541-1608 with Abenaki peoples having moved in by the time Samuel de Champlain came to the region establishing Quebec City.
1627 illustration of local people hunting on Pesamkuk (Mount Desert Island) by Mattheüs Merian
Yellow - Miꞌkmaꞌki, Orange - Wolastokuk, Red - Peskotomuhkatik, Brown - Pαnawαhpskewahki, Cayenne - Ndakinna

The dots are the listed capitals, being political centers in Wabanaki.

The mixed region is territory outside of the historic ranges of the five tribes. It was acquired from the St.Lawrence Iroquois between 1541-1608 with Abenaki peoples having moved in by the time Samuel de Champlain came to the region establishing Quebec City.
This Spanish chart of the Saint Lawrence River showing Wabanaki lands at the bottom, from ca. 1541, contains a legend in front of the "isla de Orliens" that says: "Here many French died of hunger"; possibly alluding to Cartier's second settlement in 1535–1536
Samuel de Champlain fighting on July 30, 1609, alongside the Western Abenaki in a successful battle against the Iroquois at Lake Champlain
Symbol of the Wabanaki Union of Tribes, still in use. It was originally embroidered onto the ceremonial clothing of sakoms.
Colorized photo of 1915 reproductions of Wabanaki wampum belts that would have been used for political matters.
Miꞌkmaꞌki: Divided into seven districts. Not shown is Taqamgug/Tagamuk, the eighth district that includes the entire island of Newfoundland.
Map of the campaigns during the King William's War.
Deportation of the Acadians, Grand-Pré.
Mi'kmaq
Maliseet, Passamaquoddy
Eastern Abenaki (Penobscot, Kennebec, Arosaguntacook, Pigwacket/Pequawket)
Western Abenaki (Arsigantegok, Missisquoi, Cowasuck, Sokoki, Pennacook

The Western Abenaki live on lands in Quebec as well as in Vermont, and New Hampshire within the United States.

Quebec

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One of the thirteen provinces and territories of Canada.

One of the thirteen provinces and territories of Canada.

A depiction of Jacques Cartier by Théophile Hamel, 1844
Three Huron-Wyandot chiefs from Wendake. New France had largely peaceful relations with the Indigenous people, such as their allies the Huron. After the defeat of the Huron by their mutual enemy, the Iroquois, many fled from Ontario to Quebec.
Montcalm leading his troops into battle. Watercolour by Charles William Jefferys.
The Province of Quebec in 1774
The Battle of Saint-Eustache was the final battle of the Lower Canada Rebellion.
George-Étienne Cartier, creator of the Quebec state and premier of Canada East
Maurice Duplessis, premier of Quebec from 1936 to 1939 and during the Grande Noirceur
"Maîtres chez nous" was the electoral slogan of the Liberal Party during the 1962 election.
René Lévesque, one of the architects of the Quiet Revolution, and the Premier of Quebec's first modern sovereignist government
Map of Quebec
Michel's falls on Ashuapmushuan River in Saint-Félicien, Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean
Köppen climate types of Quebec
Baie-Saint-Paul during winter
The Parliament Building in Quebec City
The seventeen administrative regions of Quebec.
The Édifice Ernest-Cormier is the courthouse for the Quebec Court of Appeal in Montreal
The Basilica of Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré
Map of aboriginal communities in Quebec, this includes reserves, settlements and northern villages.
The Institut national de la recherche scientifique helps to advance scientific knowledge and to train a new generation of students in various scientific and technological sectors.
Quebec's exports to the international market. The United States is the country which buys the most Québécois exports by far. (2011)
The Beauharnois generating station, operated by Hydro-Québec
A mockup of the Airbus A220 (formerly the Bombardier CSeries), originally developed by Bombardier Aerospace
The Château Frontenac is the most photographed hotel in the world.
In 1969, Héroux-Devtek designed and manufactured the undercarriage of the Apollo Lunar Module.
The ferry N.M. Camille-Marcoux, of the Société des traversiers du Québec
The show Dralion, Cirque du Soleil, introduced in 2004
La chasse-galerie (1906) by Henri Julien, showing a scene from a popular Quebec folk legend.
La Cavalière by Charles Daudelin, 1963, installed in front of the pavilion Gérard Morisset of the Quebec National Museum of Fine Arts in Quebec City
Maison Routhier in Sainte-Foy. This kind of Canadien-style house remains a symbol of Canadien nationalism.
A classic poutine from La Banquise in Montreal
The Montreal Canadiens at the Bell Centre
St-Jean-Baptiste Day celebrations at Maisonneuve park in Montréal
The Fleurdelisé flying at Place d'Armes in Montreal
Canada in the 18th century.
The Province of Quebec from 1763 to 1783.
Lower Canada from 1791 to 1841. (Patriots' War in 1837, Canada East in 1841)
Quebec from 1867 to 1927.
Quebec today. Quebec (in blue) has a border dispute with Labrador (in red).
Different forest areas of Quebec. 1. Middle Arctic Tundra
2. Low Arctic Tundra
3. Torngat Mountain Tundra
4. Eastern Canadian Shield Taiga
5. Southern Hudson Bay Taiga
6. Central Canadian Shield Forests
7. Eastern Canadian Forests
8. Eastern Forest/Boreal Transition
9. Eastern Great Lakes Lowland Forests
10. New England/Acadian Forests
11. Gulf of St. Lawrence Lowland Forests

Located in Central Canada, the province shares land borders with Ontario to the west, Newfoundland and Labrador to the northeast, New Brunswick to the southeast, and a coastal border with Nunavut; in the south it borders Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York in the United States.

Southern terminus of I-93 at I-95 in Canton, Massachusetts

Interstate 93

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Southern terminus of I-93 at I-95 in Canton, Massachusetts
Signs in the Financial District of Boston point toward Downtown Crossing, Chinatown, In-93, and I-90
I-93 north approaching its southern interchange with I-293 and NH 101 in Manchester
Northbound lane of I-93/US 3 in Franconia Notch
Route of the original Central Artery, as well as other roadways affected by the Big Dig
Route of the new Central Artery after the Big Dig
I-93 through the O'Neill Tunnel
The South Bay Interchange (looking south) to the Southeast Expressway with Great Blue Hill visible in the background

Interstate 93 (I-93) is an Interstate Highway in the New England states of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont in the United States.

New Hampshire Exit 15 (Montcalm), looking south

Interstate 89

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Interstate Highway in the New England region of the United States traveling from Bow, New Hampshire, to the Canadian border between Highgate Springs, Vermont, and Saint-Armand, Quebec.

Interstate Highway in the New England region of the United States traveling from Bow, New Hampshire, to the Canadian border between Highgate Springs, Vermont, and Saint-Armand, Quebec.

New Hampshire Exit 15 (Montcalm), looking south
Interstate 89 northbound in Vermont, approaching Exit 2 in Sharon
I-89 Exit 17 in Colchester (June 5, 2015), Chittenden County
The Whale Tails along I-89 northbound in South Burlington, just west of Exit 12

The largest cities directly served by I-89 are Concord, the state capital of New Hampshire, Montpelier, the state capital of Vermont, and Burlington, Vermont.

English Americans

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English Americans, or Anglo-Americans, are Americans whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England.

English Americans, or Anglo-Americans, are Americans whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England.

England United States. Shows the first permanent English settlement of Jamestown in 1607.
Statue of John Smith for the first English settlement in Historic Jamestowne, Virginia.
The first self-governing document of Plymouth Colony. English Pilgrims signing the Mayflower Compact in 1620.
John Trumbull's famous painting, Declaration of Independence.
English language distribution in the United States.
American cultural icons, apple pie, baseball, and the American flag.
The First Thanksgiving at Plymouth Colony by English Pilgrims in October 1621.
Henry Chadwick’s early contributions to the development of the game is often called the "Father of Baseball".

The same 1909 data for each state (of the total European population only) of English ancestry were Connecticut 96.2%, Rhode Island 96.0%, Vermont 95.4%, Massachusetts 95.0%, New Hampshire 94.1%, Maine 93.1%, Virginia 85.0%, Maryland 84.0%, North Carolina 83.1%, South Carolina 82.4%, New York 78.2% and Pennsylvania 59.0%.