New Jersey Plan

The New Jersey Plan (also known as the Small State Plan or the Paterson Plan) was a proposal for the structure of the United States Government presented by William Paterson at the Constitutional Convention on June 15, 1787.wikipedia
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Constitutional Convention (United States)

Constitutional ConventionPhiladelphia ConventionConstitutional Convention of 1787
The New Jersey Plan (also known as the Small State Plan or the Paterson Plan) was a proposal for the structure of the United States Government presented by William Paterson at the Constitutional Convention on June 15, 1787.
Several broad outlines were proposed and debated, most notably James Madison's Virginia Plan and William Paterson's New Jersey Plan.

William Paterson (judge)

William PatersonPatersonJudge William Paterson
The New Jersey Plan (also known as the Small State Plan or the Paterson Plan) was a proposal for the structure of the United States Government presented by William Paterson at the Constitutional Convention on June 15, 1787.
He represented New Jersey at the 1787 Philadelphia Convention, where he proposed the New Jersey Plan, which would have provided for equal representation among the states in Congress.

Virginia Plan

a plan
The plan was created in response to the Virginia Plan, which called for two houses of Congress, both elected with apportionment according to population.
It existed alongside the New Jersey Plan for the structure of the United States government, which was formed in response to the Virginia Plan to protect small states' interests.

James Madison

MadisonPresident MadisonPresident James Madison
The New Jersey Plan was opposed by James Madison and Edmund Randolph (the proponents of the Virginia State Plan).
However, delegates from small states successfully argued for more power for state governments and presented the New Jersey Plan as an alternative.

Supremacy Clause

supreme law of the landU.S. Const. Art. VIsupreme law
In Madison's Notes of Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787, the Supremacy Clause is introduced as part of the New Jersey Plan.

United States House of Representatives

U.S. RepresentativeU.S. House of RepresentativesUnited States Representative
Perhaps the most important of these was introduced by the Connecticut Compromise, which established a bicameral legislature with the U.S. House of Representatives apportioned by population, as desired by the Virginia Plan, and the Senate granted equal votes per state, as desired by the New Jersey Plan.
The smaller states, however, favored the New Jersey Plan, which called for a unicameral Congress with equal representation for the states.

Connecticut Compromise

Great Compromisecompromise on representationConnecticut Compromise (USA)
Perhaps the most important of these was introduced by the Connecticut Compromise, which established a bicameral legislature with the U.S. House of Representatives apportioned by population, as desired by the Virginia Plan, and the Senate granted equal votes per state, as desired by the New Jersey Plan.
The New Jersey Plan, as it was called, would have left the Articles of Confederation in place, but would have amended them to somewhat increase Congress's powers.

Federal government of the United States

United States governmentU.S. governmentfederal government
The New Jersey Plan (also known as the Small State Plan or the Paterson Plan) was a proposal for the structure of the United States Government presented by William Paterson at the Constitutional Convention on June 15, 1787.

Apportionment (politics)

reapportionmentmalapportionmentapportionment
The plan was created in response to the Virginia Plan, which called for two houses of Congress, both elected with apportionment according to population.

Articles of Confederation

Articles of Confederation and Perpetual UnionConfederationArticles
The less populous states were adamantly opposed to giving most of the control of the national government to the more populous states, and so proposed an alternative plan that would have kept the one-vote-per-state representation under one legislative body from the Articles of Confederation. Under the New Jersey Plan, the unicameral legislature with one vote per state was inherited from the Articles of Confederation.

Edmund Randolph

Edmund Jennings RandolphMr. RandolphEdmund J. Randolph
The New Jersey Plan was opposed by James Madison and Edmund Randolph (the proponents of the Virginia State Plan).

Unicameralism

unicameralunicameral legislatureunicameral parliament
Under the New Jersey Plan, the unicameral legislature with one vote per state was inherited from the Articles of Confederation.

Treason

high treasontraitortraitors
Variations also proposed that state governments must be bound by oath to support the Articles, that a policy should be established to handle territorial disputes, and that the offenses deemed as treason should be defined.

Tariff

tariffscustoms dutyimport duties

Bicameralism

bicameralbicameral legislaturechambers
Perhaps the most important of these was introduced by the Connecticut Compromise, which established a bicameral legislature with the U.S. House of Representatives apportioned by population, as desired by the Virginia Plan, and the Senate granted equal votes per state, as desired by the New Jersey Plan.

United States Senate

U.S. SenatorUnited States SenatorU.S. Senate
Perhaps the most important of these was introduced by the Connecticut Compromise, which established a bicameral legislature with the U.S. House of Representatives apportioned by population, as desired by the Virginia Plan, and the Senate granted equal votes per state, as desired by the New Jersey Plan.

History of the United States Constitution

ratification of the United States ConstitutionratificationConstitutional Convention
The "old patriots," later called "Anti-Federalists," advocated the New Jersey Plan, a purely federal proposal, based on providing each state with equal representation.

History of the United States Congress

first sessionhistory of the U.S. Congress
The smaller states, however, favored the New Jersey Plan, which had a unicameral Congress with equal representation for the states.