New Testament

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The New Testament (, transl. Hē Kainḕ Diathḗkē; Novum Testamentum) is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first being the Old Testament.wikipedia
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Old Testament

Oldthe Old TestamentBiblical
The New Testament (, transl. Hē Kainḕ Diathḗkē; Novum Testamentum) is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first being the Old Testament.
The second part of Christian Bibles is the New Testament, originally written in the Koine Greek language.

Development of the New Testament canon

New Testament canonNew Testament canon developedNew Testament
While the Old Testament canon varies somewhat between different Christian denominations, the 27-book canon of the New Testament has been almost universally recognized within Christianity since at least Late Antiquity.
The canon of the New Testament is the set of books Christians regard as divinely inspired and constituting the New Testament of the Christian Bible.

Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faith
While the Old Testament canon varies somewhat between different Christian denominations, the 27-book canon of the New Testament has been almost universally recognized within Christianity since at least Late Antiquity.
Its adherents, known as Christians, believe that Jesus is the Christ, whose coming as the messiah was prophesied in the Hebrew Bible, called the Old Testament in Christianity, and chronicled in the New Testament.

Christian biblical canons

Christian BibleChristian biblical canoncanonical
The New Testament (, transl. Hē Kainḕ Diathḗkē; Novum Testamentum) is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first being the Old Testament.
Such bibles are always divided into the Old Testament and the New Testament.

Gospel of Matthew

MatthewMatthew's GospelGospel according to Matthew
Thus, in almost all Christian traditions today, the New Testament consists of 27 books: the four canonical gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John), the Acts of the Apostles, the fourteen epistles of Paul, the seven catholic epistles, and the Book of Revelation.
The Gospel According to Matthew (Εὐαγγέλιον κατὰ Μαθθαῖον also called the Gospel of Matthew, or simply Matthew) is the first book of the New Testament and one of the three synoptic gospels.

Acts of the Apostles

ActsBook of ActsActs of Apostles
Thus, in almost all Christian traditions today, the New Testament consists of 27 books: the four canonical gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John), the Acts of the Apostles, the fourteen epistles of Paul, the seven catholic epistles, and the Book of Revelation. For example, Richard Pervo dates Luke-Acts to c. AD 115, and David Trobisch places Acts in the mid- to late second century, contemporaneous with the publication of the first New Testament canon.
The Acts of the Apostles (, Práxeis Apostólōn; Actūs Apostolōrum), often referred to simply as Acts, or formally the Book of Acts, is the fifth book of the New Testament; it tells of the founding of the Christian church and the spread of its message to the Roman Empire.

Book of Revelation

RevelationApocalypseRevelation of John
Thus, in almost all Christian traditions today, the New Testament consists of 27 books: the four canonical gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John), the Acts of the Apostles, the fourteen epistles of Paul, the seven catholic epistles, and the Book of Revelation.
The Book of Revelation, often called the Book of Revelations, Revelation to John, the Apocalypse of John, The Revelation, or simply Revelation, the Revelation of Jesus Christ (from its opening words) or the Apocalypse, is the final book of the New Testament, and therefore also the final book of the Christian Bible.

John Robinson (bishop of Woolwich)

John RobinsonJohn A. T. RobinsonJohn A.T. Robinson
Conservative scholars John A. T. Robinson, Dan Wallace, and William F. Albright dated all the books of the New Testament before 70 AD.
John Arthur Thomas Robinson (16 May 1919 – 5 December 1983) was an English New Testament scholar, author and the Anglican Bishop of Woolwich.

David Trobisch

For example, Richard Pervo dates Luke-Acts to c. AD 115, and David Trobisch places Acts in the mid- to late second century, contemporaneous with the publication of the first New Testament canon.
David Johannes Trobisch is a scholar whose work has focused on formation of the Christian Bible, ancient New Testament manuscripts and the epistles of Paul.

Daniel B. Wallace

Daniel WallaceDan Wallace
Conservative scholars John A. T. Robinson, Dan Wallace, and William F. Albright dated all the books of the New Testament before 70 AD.
He is also the founder and executive director of the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts, the purpose of which is digitizing all known Greek manuscripts of the New Testament via digital photographs.

Nazareth

Nazareth, IsraelNatzrátNatzrat
Each of the four gospels in the New Testament narrates the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth.
In the New Testament, the town is described as the childhood home of Jesus, and as such is a center of Christian pilgrimage, with many shrines commemorating biblical events.

Koine Greek

GreekKoineNew Testament Greek
The New Testament is a collection of Christian texts originally written in the Koine Greek language, at different times by various different authors.
Koine is also the language of the Christian New Testament, of the Septuagint (the 3rd-century BC Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible), and of most early Christian theological writing by the Church Fathers.

Matthew the Apostle

MatthewSaint MatthewSt Matthew
Matthew the Apostle, also known as Saint Matthew and as Levi, was, according to the New Testament, one of the twelve apostles of Jesus.

Genealogy of Jesus

Ancestors of ChristGenealogy of Christgenealogies of Jesus
The New Testament provides two accounts of the genealogy of Jesus, one in the Gospel of Matthew and another in the Gospel of Luke.

Jesus in Christianity

JesusJesus ChristChrist
The New Testament discusses the teachings and person of Jesus, as well as events in first-century Christianity.
Christian views of Jesus are derived from various biblical sources, particularly from the canonical Gospels and New Testament letters such as the Pauline epistles.

John the Baptist

St. John the BaptistSaint John the BaptistSt John the Baptist
According to the New Testament, John anticipated a messianic figure greater than himself, and the Gospels portray John as the precursor or forerunner of Jesus, since John announces Jesus' coming and prepares the people for Jesus' ministry.

Epistle to the Romans

RomansLetter to the RomansBook of Romans
The Epistle to the Romans or Letter to the Romans, often shortened to Romans, is the sixth book in the New Testament.

Paul the Apostle

PaulSaint PaulSt. Paul
Regarding authorship, although the Epistle to the Hebrews does not internally claim to have been written by the Apostle Paul, some similarities in wordings to some of the Pauline Epistles have been noted and inferred.
According to the New Testament book Acts of the Apostles (often simply called Acts), Paul was dedicated to persecuting the early disciples of Jesus in the area of Jerusalem prior to his conversion.

Epistle to the Galatians

GalatiansLetter to the Galatiansbook of Galatians
How the Mosaic law should be applied came up at Adventist conferences in the past, and Adventist theologians such as A. T. Jones and E. J. Waggoner looked at the problem addressed by Paul in Galatians as not the ceremonial law, but rather the wrong use of the law (legalism).
The Epistle to the Galatians, often shortened to Galatians, is the ninth book of the New Testament.

Epistle to the Ephesians

EphesiansLetter to the EphesiansEph
The Epistle to the Ephesians, also called the Letter to the Ephesians and often shortened to Ephesians, is the tenth book of the New Testament.

First Epistle to the Corinthians

1 CorinthiansI CorinthiansFirst Corinthians
The First Epistle to the Corinthians, usually referred to as First Corinthians or 1 Corinthians is a Pauline epistle of the New Testament of the Christian Bible.

Second Epistle to the Thessalonians

2 ThessaloniansSecond Thessalonians2 Thes
The Second Epistle to the Thessalonians, commonly referred to as Second Thessalonians or 2 Thessalonians is a book from the New Testament of the Christian Bible.

Epistle to the Colossians

ColossiansLetter to the ColossiansCol.
The Epistle of Paul to the Colossians, (or simply Colossians), is the twelfth book of the New Testament.

Luke the Evangelist

LukeSaint LukeSt. Luke
Church tradition identified him as Luke the Evangelist, the companion of Paul, but the majority of scholars reject this due to the many differences between Acts and the authentic Pauline letters.
The Early Church Fathers ascribed to him authorship of both the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles, which would mean Luke contributed over a quarter of the text of the New Testament, more than any other author.

Epistle to the Hebrews

HebrewsLetter to the HebrewsBook of Hebrews
The Epistle to the Hebrews addresses a Jewish audience who had come to believe that Jesus was the anointed one (Hebrew: מָשִׁיחַ—transliterated in English as "Moshiach", or "Messiah"; Greek: Χριστός—transliterated in English as "Christos", for "Christ") who was predicted in the writings of the Hebrew Scriptures.
The Epistle to the Hebrews, or Letter to the Hebrews, or in the Greek manuscripts, simply To the Hebrews is one of the books of the New Testament.