New York (magazine)

New YorkNew York MagazineVultureNew York'' magazineVulture.comThe CutNY MagazineNY MagNYMag.comCue
New York is an American biweekly magazine concerned with life, culture, politics, and style generally, and with a particular emphasis on New York City.wikipedia
3,736 Related Articles

Clay Felker

Founded by Milton Glaser and Clay Felker in 1968 as a competitor to The New Yorker, it was brasher and less polite, and established itself as a cradle of New Journalism. Edited first by Sheldon Zalaznick and then by Clay Felker, the magazine showcased the work of several talented Tribune contributors, including Tom Wolfe, Barbara Goldsmith, and Jimmy Breslin.
Clay Schuette Felker (October 2, 1925 – July 1, 2008) was an American magazine editor and journalist who co-founded New York Magazine in 1968.

Milton Glaser

Glaser, Milton
Founded by Milton Glaser and Clay Felker in 1968 as a competitor to The New Yorker, it was brasher and less polite, and established itself as a cradle of New Journalism.
In 1954, he also co-founded Push Pin Studios, co-founded New York magazine with Clay Felker, and established Milton Glaser, Inc. in 1974.

Frank Rich

Over time, it became more national in scope, publishing many noteworthy articles on American culture by writers such as Tom Wolfe, Jimmy Breslin, Nora Ephron, John Heilemann, Frank Rich, and Rebecca Traister.
Rich is currently writer-at-large for New York magazine, where he writes essays on politics and culture and engages in regular dialogues on news of the week for the "Daily Intelligencer".

Adam Moss

In its 21st-century incarnation under editor-in-chief Adam Moss, "The nation's best and most-imitated city magazine is often not about the city—at least not in the overcrowded, traffic-clogged, five-boroughs sense", wrote then Washington Post media critic Howard Kurtz, as the magazine has increasingly published political and cultural stories of national significance.
Since 2004, he has been the editor-in-chief of New York magazine.

Rebecca Traister

Traister, Rebecca
Over time, it became more national in scope, publishing many noteworthy articles on American culture by writers such as Tom Wolfe, Jimmy Breslin, Nora Ephron, John Heilemann, Frank Rich, and Rebecca Traister.
She is currently a writer-at-large for New York magazine and The Cut, and a contributing editor at Elle magazine.

New Journalism

New Journalistsparticipatory journalismThe New Journalism
Founded by Milton Glaser and Clay Felker in 1968 as a competitor to The New Yorker, it was brasher and less polite, and established itself as a cradle of New Journalism.
Articles in the New Journalism style tended not to be found in newspapers, but rather in magazines such as The Atlantic Monthly, Harper's, CoEvolution Quarterly, Esquire, New York, The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, and for a short while in the early 1970s, Scanlan's Monthly.

George Goodman

Adam SmithGeorge J. W. Goodman
Among the by-lines were many familiar names from the magazine's earlier incarnation, including Breslin, Wolfe (who wrote "You and Your Big Mouth: How the Honks and Wonks Reveal the Phonetic Truth about Status" in the inaugural issue ), and George Goodman, a financial writer who wrote as "Adam Smith".
George Jerome Waldo Goodman (August 10, 1930 – January 3, 2014) was an American author and economics broadcast commentator, best known by his pseudonym Adam Smith (which was assigned by Clay Felker at New York magazine in order to keep his published articles about Wall Street anonymous).

Tom Wolfe

Wolfe, Tomauthor of the same nameThomas Kennerly Wolfe
Over time, it became more national in scope, publishing many noteworthy articles on American culture by writers such as Tom Wolfe, Jimmy Breslin, Nora Ephron, John Heilemann, Frank Rich, and Rebecca Traister. Edited first by Sheldon Zalaznick and then by Clay Felker, the magazine showcased the work of several talented Tribune contributors, including Tom Wolfe, Barbara Goldsmith, and Jimmy Breslin.
The editors of the Herald Tribune, including Clay Felker of the Sunday section supplement New York magazine, encouraged their writers to break the conventions of newspaper writing.

Gloria Steinem

GloriaGloria StienemSteinem
Breslin became a regular, as did Gloria Steinem, who wrote the city-politics column, and Gail Sheehy.
Steinem was a columnist for New York magazine, and a co-founder of Ms. magazine.

Gail Sheehy

Sheehy, GailPassagesPassages'' (book)
Breslin became a regular, as did Gloria Steinem, who wrote the city-politics column, and Gail Sheehy.
She is the author of seventeen books and numerous high-profile articles for magazines such as New York and Vanity Fair.

Jimmy Breslin

Breslin, JimmyJimmy Breslin's PeopleJames Breslin
Over time, it became more national in scope, publishing many noteworthy articles on American culture by writers such as Tom Wolfe, Jimmy Breslin, Nora Ephron, John Heilemann, Frank Rich, and Rebecca Traister. Edited first by Sheldon Zalaznick and then by Clay Felker, the magazine showcased the work of several talented Tribune contributors, including Tom Wolfe, Barbara Goldsmith, and Jimmy Breslin.
When the Sunday supplement of the Tribune was reworked into New York magazine by editor Clay Felker in 1962, Breslin appeared in the new edition, which became "the hottest Sunday read in town."

John Heilemann

Heilemann, John
Over time, it became more national in scope, publishing many noteworthy articles on American culture by writers such as Tom Wolfe, Jimmy Breslin, Nora Ephron, John Heilemann, Frank Rich, and Rebecca Traister.
Heilemann has formerly been a staff writer for New York, Wired, and The Economist.

New York Herald Tribune

New York Herald-TribuneThe New York Herald TribuneHerald Tribune
New York began life in 1963 as the Sunday-magazine supplement of the New York Herald Tribune newspaper.
New York magazine, created as the Herald Tribunes Sunday magazine in 1963, was revived by editor Clay Felker in 1968, and continues to publish today.

Judith Crist

Crist, Judith
Judith Crist wrote movie reviews.
She was the founding film critic at New York magazine and became known to most Americans as a critic at the weekly magazine TV Guide and at the morning TV show Today.

National Magazine Awards

National Magazine AwardNational Magazine Award for ReportingNational Magazine Award for Fiction
Since its redesign and relaunch in 2004, the magazine has won more National Magazine Awards than any other publication, including the 2013 award for Magazine of the Year.

Gael Greene

Gael Greene, writing under the rubric "The Insatiable Critic", reviewed restaurants, cultivating a baroque writing style that leaned heavily on sexual metaphor.
She became New York magazine's restaurant critic in fall 1968, at a time when most New Yorkers were unsophisticated about food and there were few chefs anyone knew by name, and for four decades both documented and inspired the city's and America's growing obsession with food.

Howard Kurtz

KurtzKurtz, HowardSpin Cycle: Inside the Clinton Propaganda Machine
In its 21st-century incarnation under editor-in-chief Adam Moss, "The nation's best and most-imitated city magazine is often not about the city—at least not in the overcrowded, traffic-clogged, five-boroughs sense", wrote then Washington Post media critic Howard Kurtz, as the magazine has increasingly published political and cultural stories of national significance.
Kurtz has also written for The New Republic, The Washington Monthly, and New York magazine.

Barbara Goldsmith

Edited first by Sheldon Zalaznick and then by Clay Felker, the magazine showcased the work of several talented Tribune contributors, including Tom Wolfe, Barbara Goldsmith, and Jimmy Breslin.
After the Tribune failed in 1967, Goldsmith provided Felker with the money to purchase the rights to the magazine and reinvent it as a standalone glossy, and in 1968 she became a founding editor and writer of New York, where she wrote not only about art, but also about the colorful characters in the art world.

Ms. (magazine)

Ms.Ms. MagazineMs.'' magazine
In 1972, New York, after a lot of convincing by Gloria Steinem, also launched Ms. magazine, which began as a special issue.
Ms. first appeared in 1971 as an insert in New York magazine.

Vox Media

VoxRackedEater
On September 24th, 2019, Vox Media announced it purchased New York Magazine and its parent company, New York Media.
In September 2019, Vox Media agreed to acquire and merge with New York Media, the parent company of New York magazine.

Tribal Rites of the New Saturday Night

2001 Odyssey Discostory
In 1976, journalist Nik Cohn contributed a story called "Tribal Rites of the New Saturday Night," about a young man in a working-class Brooklyn neighborhood who, once a week, went to a local disco called Odyssey 2001; the story was a sensation and served as the basis for the film Saturday Night Fever.
"Tribal Rites of the New Saturday Night" was the title of a 1976 New York Magazine article by British rock journalist Nik Cohn.

Saturday Night Fever

Tony Manero1977 film1977 movie
In 1976, journalist Nik Cohn contributed a story called "Tribal Rites of the New Saturday Night," about a young man in a working-class Brooklyn neighborhood who, once a week, went to a local disco called Odyssey 2001; the story was a sensation and served as the basis for the film Saturday Night Fever.
The story is based upon a 1976 New York magazine article by British writer Nik Cohn, "Tribal Rites of the New Saturday Night"; in the mid-1990s, Cohn acknowledged that he fabricated the article.

Brat Pack

The Brat PackBrat Pack (actors)Brat Packer
The term "the Brat Pack" was coined for a 1985 story in the magazine.
First mentioned in a 1985 New York magazine article, it is now usually defined as the cast members of two specific films released in 1985—The Breakfast Club and St. Elmo's Fire—although other actors are sometimes included.

Radical chic

militant chicRad/Chicradical-chic
Wolfe, a regular contributor to the magazine, wrote a story in 1970 that captured the spirit of the magazine (if not the age): "Radical Chic: That Party at Lenny's".
The phrase "radical chic" originated in a 1970 New York article by Tom Wolfe, titled "Radical Chic: That Party at Lenny's", which was later reprinted in his books Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers and The Purple Decades.

Harold Clurman

Harold Clurman Theatre
(Sheehy would eventually marry Felker, in 1984.) Harold Clurman was hired as the theater critic.
In addition, Clurman helped shape American theater by writing about it, as drama critic for The New Republic (1948–52) and then for The Nation (1953–1980) and briefly New York (1968).