A report on New York City

New Amsterdam, centered in the eventual Lower Manhattan, in 1664, the year England took control and renamed it "New York"
Fort George and the City of New York c. 1731. Royal Navy ships of the line are seen guarding what would become New York Harbor.
Columbia University was founded by royal charter in 1754 under the name of King's College.
The Battle of Long Island, the largest battle of the American Revolution, took place in Brooklyn in 1776.
Broadway follows the Native American Wickquasgeck Trail through Manhattan.
The current 5 boroughs of Greater New York as they appeared in 1814. Bronx was in Westchester County, Queens County included modern Nassau County, Kings County had 6 towns, one of which was Brooklyn, New York City is shown by hatching in southern New York County on the island of Manhattan, and Richmond County on Staten Island.
A construction worker atop the Empire State Building as it was being built in 1930. The Chrysler Building is behind him.
Manhattan's Little Italy, Lower East Side, circa 1900
The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement
United Airlines Flight 175 hits the South Tower of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.
The core of the New York City metropolitan area, with Manhattan Island at its center
Lower and Midtown Manhattan, as seen by a SkySat satellite in 2017
Central Park in Winter by Raymond Speers, in Munsey's Magazine, February 1900
Flushing Meadows–Corona Park was used in both the 1939 and 1964 New York World's Fair, with the Unisphere as the centerpiece of the latter and which remains today.
The Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island in New York Harbor is a symbol of the United States and its ideals of freedom, democracy, and opportunity.
View of The Pond and Midtown Manhattan from the Gapstow Bridge in Central Park, one of the world's most visited tourist attractions, in 2019
California sea lions play at the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
A map of racial distribution in New York, 2010 U.S. census. Each dot is 25 people:
The landmark Neo-Gothic Roman Catholic St. Patrick's Cathedral, Midtown Manhattan
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish residents in Brooklyn. Brooklyn has the largest Jewish community in the United States, with approximately 600,000 individuals.
The Islamic Cultural Center of New York in Upper Manhattan was the first mosque built in New York City.
Ganesh Temple in Flushing, Queens, is the oldest Hindu temple in the Western Hemisphere.
The New York Stock Exchange, by a significant margin the world's largest stock exchange per market capitalization of its listed companies, at US$23.1 trillion as of April 2018. Pictured is the exchange's building on Wall Street.
The Deutsche Bank Center as viewed from Central Park West
Times Square is the hub of the Broadway theater district and a media center. It also has one of the highest annual attendance rates of any tourist attraction in the world, estimated at 50 million.
The I Love New York logo, designed by Milton Glaser in 1977
Rockefeller Center is home to NBC Studios.
Times Square Studios, home of Good Morning America
Butler Library at Columbia University, described as one of the most beautiful college libraries in the United States
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of both New York University (NYU) and its Greenwich Village neighborhood
New York-Presbyterian Hospital, affiliated with Columbia University and Cornell University, the largest hospital and largest private employer in New York City and one of the world's busiest
The New York Police Department (NYPD) is the largest police force in the United States.
Police officers of New York Police Department (NYPD)
The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) is the largest municipal fire department in the United States.
The Stephen A. Schwarzman Headquarters Building of the New York Public Library, at 5th Avenue and 42nd Street
The fast-paced streets of New York City, January 2020
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, part of Museum Mile, is one of the largest museums in the world.
Smorgasburg opened in 2011 as an open-air food market and is part of the Brooklyn Flea.
As of 2012, the city had about 6,000 hybrid taxis (shown) in service, the largest number of any city in North America.
New York City Hall is the oldest City Hall in the United States that still houses its original governmental functions.
The New York County Courthouse houses the New York Supreme Court and other offices.
Eric Adams, the current and 110th Mayor of New York City
New York City is home to the two busiest train stations in the U.S., including Grand Central Terminal.
The New York City Subway is the world's largest rapid transit system by number of stations.
The Port Authority Bus Terminal, the world's busiest bus station, at 8th Avenue and 42nd Street
John F. Kennedy Airport in Queens, the busiest international air passenger gateway to the United States
The Staten Island Ferry shuttles commuters between Manhattan and Staten Island.
Yellow medallion taxicabs are widely recognized icons of the city.
8th Avenue, looking northward ("uptown"). Most streets and avenues in Manhattan's grid plan incorporate a one-way traffic configuration.
The George Washington Bridge, connecting Upper Manhattan (background) from Fort Lee, New Jersey across the Hudson River, is the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge.
The growing skyline of Long Island City, Queens (background),<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-10-30/nyc-s-fastest-growing-neighborhood-gets-180-million-investment|title=NYC's Fastest-Growing Neighborhood Gets $180 Million Investment|first=Henry|last=Goldman|date=October 30, 2018|publisher=Bloomberg L.P|access-date=October 30, 2018}}</ref> facing the East River and Manhattan in May 2017
The Grand Concourse in the Bronx, foreground, with Manhattan in the background in February 2018
St. George, Staten Island as seen from the Staten Island Ferry, the world's busiest passenger-only ferry system, shuttling passengers between Manhattan and Staten Island
The Asia gate entrance to the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
The Spanish Harlem Orchestra. New York City is home to nearly 3 million Latino Americans, the largest Hispanic population of any city outside Latin America and Spain.
The Financial District of Lower Manhattan including Wall Street, the world's principal financial center

Most populous city in the United States.

- New York City

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Philadelphia

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Benjamin Franklin, 1777
Independence Hall on Chestnut Street between 5th and 6th Streets in Philadelphia, where the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were ratified on July 4, 1776 and June 21, 1788, respectively
An 18th-century map of Philadelphia, circa 1752
Sentinel-2 true-color image of Philadelphia and the Delaware River, September 2020
This 1683 portrait of Philadelphia, created by Thomas Holme, is believed to be the first map ever developed of the city of Philadelphia
Center City Philadelphia's contrasting architectural styles can be seen in One Liberty Place, built between 1985 and 1987 (in the background), and Philadelphia City Hall, built between 1871 and 1901 (in the foreground), July 2009
Philadelphia's Fairmount Park along the Schuylkill River, circa 1900
Map of racial distribution in Philadelphia, 2010 Census. Each dot is 25 people:
Philadelphia's famed Italian Market, part of South Philadelphia's Italian heritage, June 2006
"Leacht Cuimhneacháin na Gael", an Irish famine memorial at Penn's Landing honors the large Irish community (14.2% of the city's population), April 2015
Gayborhood street sign, near Washington Square, April 2007
Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral of the Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania, April 2010
Interior of the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul, built in the 1860s
The Philadelphia Stock Exchange, the oldest stock exchange in the United States, October 2009
FMC Tower at Cira Centre South, July 2018
William Penn Charter School, established in 1689, is the oldest Quaker school in the nation
The campus of the University of Pennsylvania, an Ivy League university in Philadelphia and one of the highest ranked universities in the world, November 2005
Medical Hall housing at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, the oldest medical school in the United States
Philadelphia Museum of Art, April 2010
Keys To Community, a bust of Ben Franklin by James Peniston, 2007
Kimmel Center, home of the Philadelphia Orchestra
Curtis Institute of Music, one of the world's premier conservatories
Pat's Steaks and Geno's Steaks in Philadelphia, August 2010
The Flyers play at the Wells Fargo Center, March 2014
Historic Boathouse Row at night on the Schuylkill, a symbol of the city's rich rowing history
Old City Hall served as Philadelphia's town hall from 1800 to 1854.
James A. Byrne United States Courthouse houses the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.
Jim Kenney, the current and 99th Mayor of Philadelphia
Police Administration Building (the Roundhouse) in Center City, east of Chinatown
Mounted police officer in Center City, 1973
A Philadelphia police cruiser on Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Inquirer Building at 400 North Broad Street was home of The Philadelphia Inquirer, the third longest continuously published newspaper in the United States, until 2012. It is currently undergoing renovations to become the new headquarters of the Philadelphia Police Department.
Original studio for WCAU, Philadelphia's NBC affiliate, 1622 Chestnut Street
2016 photo of 30th Street Station, which accommodates both SEPTA regional and Amtrak national trains. 30th Street Station is Amtrak's third busiest train station in the nation.
Market–Frankford Line train departing 52nd Street station
Philadelphia International Airport, the busiest airport in Pennsylvania and 21st busiest in the nation
Traffic heading into Philadelphia on Interstate 95 during the morning rush hour, July 2008
The Ben Franklin Bridge, which connects Philadelphia and Camden, New Jersey
Suburban Station with art deco architecture at 16th Street and JFK Boulevard
Fairmount Water Works, Philadelphia's second municipal waterworks
Chinatown paifang at 10th and Arch (2013), a symbol of Philadelphia's friendship with Tianjin. Philadelphia is experiencing significant Chinese immigration from New York City, 95 miles to the north, and from China.
The Birth of Pennsylvania, 1680, by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris – William Penn, holding paper, and King Charles II
Penn's Treaty with the Indians by Benjamin West
John Trumbull's Declaration of Independence – the Committee of Five presents their draft in Independence Hall, June 28, 1776.<ref>John Hazelton, The Historical Value of Trumbull's: Declaration of Independence, Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, volume 31 (Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1907), 38.</ref>
President's House – the presidential mansion of George Washington and John Adams, 1790–1800
Opening day ceremonies at the Centennial Exposition at Memorial Hall, 1876 – first official World's fair in the United States
Elfreth's Alley, "Our nation's oldest residential street", 1702–1836<ref name="marker">Historical marker on Elfreth's Alley</ref>
Carpenters' Hall exhibiting Georgian architecture, 1770–1774
Second Bank of the United States exhibiting Greek Revival architecture, 1818–1824
Second Empire-style Philadelphia City Hall, 1871–1901, from South Broad Street
The grand concourse of the 30th Street Station, in Art Deco style, 1927–1933
The University of Pennsylvania Medical School, the oldest medical school in the United States
The paifang “Friendship Arch” at Chinatown, one of America’s largest, attracting Chinese immigrants from both New York City and China.
The annual Naked Bike Ride attracts participants domestically and worldwide to Philadelphia.
The Wharton School of Business is one of the world’s most prestigious business schools.
Jim Kenney, the 99th Mayor of Philadelphia

Philadelphia, often called Philly, is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the sixth most populous city in the U.S., and the second most populous city in the Northeast megalopolis, behind New York City.

Daytime scene on Broadway Broadway.png Broadway through Manhattan, the Bronx and lower Westchester County is highlighted in red

Broadway (Manhattan)

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Road in the U.S. state of New York.

Road in the U.S. state of New York.

Daytime scene on Broadway Broadway.png Broadway through Manhattan, the Bronx and lower Westchester County is highlighted in red
Broadway in 1834
Broadway in 1860
Somerindyke House, Bloomingdale Road, middle 19th century
Looking north from Broome Street (circa 1853–55)
In 1885, the Broadway commercial district was overrun with telephone, telegraph, and electrical lines. This view was north from Cortlandt and Maiden Lane.
The segment of Broadway in Times Square
A view up Broadway from Bowling Green, with the Chrysler Building visible in the background
A view of Broadway in 1909
Broadway looking north from 48th Street in the Theater District
X-shaped intersection of Broadway (from lower right to upper left) and Amsterdam Avenue (lower left to upper right), looking north from Sherman Square to West 72nd Street and the treetops of Verdi Square
Broadway at Dyckman Street in Inwood
North Broadway (U.S. 9) in Yonkers
The Washington Irving Memorial on North Broadway in Irvington, not far from Irving's home, Sunnyside
Canyon of Heroes during a ticker-tape parade for the Apollo 11 astronauts on August 13, 1969
Broadway under the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line's elevated structure in the Bronx
Plan of 1868 for an "arcade railway"
International Mercantile Marine Company Building

Broadway runs from State Street at Bowling Green for 13 mi through the borough of Manhattan and 2 mi through the Bronx, exiting north from New York City to run an additional 18 mi through the Westchester County municipalities of Yonkers, Hastings-On-Hudson, Dobbs Ferry, Irvington, and Tarrytown, and terminating north of Sleepy Hollow.

East River

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A navigation map for Hell Gate from c. 1885, after many of the obstructions had been removed.
A map from 1781
A "bird's-eye" view of New York City from 1859; Wallabout Bay and the East River are in the foreground, the Hudson River and New York Bay in the background
James E. Serrell's plan for an expanded Manhattan and a straightened East River
The excavations and tunnels used to undermine Hallert's Point
Firefighters working to put out the fire on the listing General Slocum
A panorama of the suspension section of the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (left) and the Hell Gate Bridge (right), as seen from Astoria Park in Queens
Exposition display showing cross-section of East River railroad tunnel to Pennsylvania Station
William Glackens's 1902 painting of East River Park, in the Brooklyn Museum
A "shot tower" at 53rd Street in Manhattan on the East River (1831)
Blackwells Island from Eighty Sixth Street, Currier & Ives (1862); Blackwell's Island is now known as Roosevelt Island
Manhattan Bridge (top) and Brooklyn Bridge (bottom); Manhattan is on the left, Brooklyn on the right (1981)
The East River passes children playing football in East River Park (2008)
Powell's Cove, in Whitestone, Queens (2009)
The East River flows past the Upper East Side (2009)
The East River with Brooklyn Heights in the background, Topsail Schooner Clipper City (2013)
The East River and Lower Manhattan (2013)

The East River is a salt water tidal estuary in New York City.

The Castello Plan, a 1660 map of New Amsterdam (the top right corner is roughly north). The fort gave The Battery its name, the large street going from the fort past the wall became Broadway, and the city wall (right) gave Wall Street its name.

New Amsterdam

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17th-century Dutch settlement established at the southern tip of Manhattan Island that served as the seat of the colonial government in New Netherland.

17th-century Dutch settlement established at the southern tip of Manhattan Island that served as the seat of the colonial government in New Netherland.

The Castello Plan, a 1660 map of New Amsterdam (the top right corner is roughly north). The fort gave The Battery its name, the large street going from the fort past the wall became Broadway, and the city wall (right) gave Wall Street its name.
The Rigging House, 120 William St., in 1846; the last remaining building of Dutch New Amsterdam, it was a Methodist church in the 1760s, then a secular building again before its destruction in the mid-19th century.
1882 depiction of the ship Mayflower sailing from England to America in 1620, in Plymouth Harbor
1626 letter in Dutch by Pieter Schaghen stating the purchase of Manhattan for 60 gulden.
A map of the Hudson River Valley c. 1635 (north is to the right)
The First Slave Auction at New Amsterdam in 1655, by Howard Pyle
New Amsterdam in 1664 (looking approximately due north)
The Fall of New Amsterdam
Redraft of the Castello Plan, drawn in 1916
Depiction of the wall of New Amsterdam on a tile in the Wall Street subway station
The 1954 unveiling of a stained-glass depiction of Peter Stuyvesant in Butler Library at Columbia University. It commemorated the 300th anniversary of the founding of New Amsterdam, though it was actually dedicated on its 329th anniversary according to the date on the Seal of New York City, or on the 301st anniversary of the city receiving municipal rights.
The Wyckoff Farm in Flatbush, Brooklyn. Some of its construction still dates from the Dutch period of what is currently New York City.
13–15 South William Street, constructed in the Dutch Colonial Revival architecture evoking New Amsterdam

In 1664, the English took over New Amsterdam and renamed it New York after the Duke of York (later James II & VII).

Randel's surveying bolt

Central Park

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Randel's surveying bolt
Map of the former Seneca Village from Viele's survey for Central Park
The Lake, one of the first features of Central Park to be completed
Bethesda Terrace and Fountain under construction in 1862
Gentry in the new park, c. undefined 1870
Belvedere Castle, completed 1869
Lower end of the mall, seen in 1901
East side of Rat Rock
Wooded area of the Ramble
Female northern cardinal, one of the bird species found in Central Park
The USS Maine National Monument
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Bethesda Terrace and Fountain
Gapstow Bridge in fall
Angel of the Waters (1873) in Bethesda Fountain
Cleopatra's Needle, the park's oldest man-made structure
Horse-drawn carriage by the park
Summerstage features free musical concerts throughout the summer.
Entrance to the Fifth Avenue–59th Street subway station just outside Central Park
66th Street transverse
Center Drive in Central Park
North Woods, one of several places where crimes were reported during the 1989 Central Park jogger case
Sheep Meadow, a common place for gatherings
Skyscrapers abut the southern border of Central Park.

Central Park is an urban park in New York City, between the Upper West and Upper East Sides of Manhattan.

Financial District, Manhattan

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Aerial view of the Financial District in 2009
1847 map showing the street layout and ferry routes for lower Manhattan
The Chamber of Commerce Building at 65 Liberty Street, one of many historical buildings in the district
The original city map of New Amsterdam, called the Castello Plan, from 1660 (the bottom left corner is approximately south, while the top right corner is approximately north) The fort eventually gave the name to The Battery, the large street leading from the fort later became known as Broadway, and the city wall (right) possibly gave the name to Wall Street.
The Twin Towers in March 2001
The Financial District area from Brooklyn. The South Street Seaport is at the lower middle, slightly to the right. Circa 2006
Leadership and Public Service High School
The Broad Street facade of the New York Stock Exchange
The Federal Reserve Bank of New York Building
The former House of Morgan building at 23 Wall Street
Federal Hall, once the U.S. Custom House, now a museum, with the towers of Wall Street behind it
One Liberty Plaza, one of the many modern skyscrapers in the area

The Financial District of Lower Manhattan, also known as FiDi, is a neighborhood located on the southern tip of Manhattan island in New York City.

The New York Stock Exchange Building's Broad Street entrance (right) as seen from Wall Street

Wall Street

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The New York Stock Exchange Building's Broad Street entrance (right) as seen from Wall Street
Street sign
The original city map called the Castello Plan from 1660, showing the wall on the right side
Depiction of the wall of New Amsterdam on a tile in the Wall Street subway station, serving the
New York City slave market about 1730
An engraving from 1855, showing a conjectural view of Wall Street, including the original Federal Hall, as it probably looked at the time of George Washington's inauguration, 1789.
View of Wall Street from corner of Broad Street, 1867. On the left is the sub-Treasury building, now the Federal Hall National Memorial.
Wall Street bombing, 1920. Federal Hall National Memorial is at the right.
Wall Street c. undefined 1870-87
A crowd at Wall and Broad Streets after the 1929 crash, with the New York Stock Exchange Building is on the right. The majority of people are congregating in Wall Street on the left between the "House of Morgan" (23 Wall Street) and Federal Hall National Memorial (26 Wall Street).
1 Wall Street, at Wall Street and Broadway
Trinity Church looking west on Wall Street.
Federal Hall National Memorial
Detail of New York Stock Exchange Building
US headquarters of Deutsche Bank on Wall Street in 2010
Street sign for Wall Street at the corner with Broadway, in front of 1 Wall Street
Pier 11
The Financial District of Lower Manhattan including Wall Street, the world’s principal financial center

Wall Street is an eight-block-long street in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan in New York City.

Aerial view of the Empire State Building in 2012

Empire State Building

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Aerial view of the Empire State Building in 2012
The five-story base as seen from Fifth Avenue, with the main entrance at center. The Empire State Building sets back significantly above the base.
A pair of sculpted concrete eagles above the Fifth Avenue entrance
Lights representing the Democratic and Republican parties just prior to the 2012 election
One of several elevator lobbies
Fifth Avenue lobby
Aluminum relief of the building
80th floor observation deck
Antenna for broadcast stations are located at the top of the building
The Waldorf–Astoria in 1901
Architectural sketch of heights and allowed building areas
A worker bolts beams during construction; the Chrysler Building can be seen in the background.
During construction in October 1930; the USS Los Angeles, ZMC-2 and a J-class blimp seen overhead
Photograph of a cable worker taken by Lewis Hine
The Empire State Building in 1932; the building had no antenna for the next 21 years, until 1953
A series of setbacks causes the building to taper with height.
The World Trade Center's Twin Towers surpassed the Empire State Building in height by 1970.
The current One World Trade Center (seen in the distance under construction) surpassed the Empire State Building's height on April 30, 2012
Height comparison of several New York City buildings, with Empire State second from left
Wreckage from the 1945 Empire State Building B-25 crash
The Empire State Building, Glenn Odem Coleman,
c. 1931
The Empire State Building is bathed annually in rainbow-colored lighting during the Pride Month of June, evoking the international LGBT icon, as seen in this 2015 image.
Since 2009, the Empire State Building has been lit blue and white annually for commencement at Columbia University
The current One World Trade Center (seen in the distance) surpassed the Empire State Building's height on April 30, 2012

The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.

Coat of arms

Columbia University

10 links

Coat of arms
Coat of arms
Samuel Johnson, the first president of Columbia
King's College Hall, 1790
Crop of 1797 Taylor map of NYC showing "The College" at its Park Place (then Robinson Street) location. Note earlier location, Trinity Church, lower left.
The Gothic Revival library and law school buildings on the Madison Avenue campus
Low Memorial Library, c. 1900
Alma Mater
College Walk
Butler Library
Union Theological Seminary
Lamont Campus entrance in Palisades, New York
The entrance to the College of Physicians and Surgeons in Washington Heights
Access to Columbia is enhanced by the 116th Street–Columbia University subway station on the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line.
Van Amringe Quadrangle and Memorial
Low Memorial Library
The Barnard College Class of 1913 processes down the steps of Low Library.
Havemeyer Hall, a National Historic Chemical Landmark, where deuterium was discovered in 1931. Research conducted in Havemeyer has led to at least seven Nobel Prizes.
President Lee Bollinger presents the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction to Jeffrey Eugenides.
Copies of the Columbia Daily Spectator being sold during the 1962–63 New York City newspaper strike
The Art Deco cover of the November 1931 edition of the Jester, celebrating the opening of the George Washington Bridge
Pupin Hall, the physics building, showing the rooftop Rutherfurd Observatory
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World Leaders Forum at Low Memorial Library
Earl Hall was listed on the National Register of Historic Places for its role in serving as a venue for meetings and dances of the Columbia Queer Alliance.
The Columbia University Marching Band in 2018
Alexander Hamilton: Founding Father of the United States; author of The Federalist Papers; first United States Secretary of the Treasury — King's College
John Jay: Founding Father of the United States; author of The Federalist Papers; first Chief Justice of the United States; second Governor of New York — King's College
Robert R. Livingston: Founding Father of the United States; drafter of the Declaration of Independence; first United States Secretary of Foreign Affairs — King's College
Gouverneur Morris: Founding Father of the United States; author of the United States Constitution; United States Senator from New York — King's College
DeWitt Clinton: United States Senator from New York; sixth Governor of New York; responsible for construction of Erie Canal — Columbia College
Barack Obama: 44th President of the United States; United States Senator from Illinois; Nobel laureate — Columbia College
Franklin D. Roosevelt: 32nd President of the United States; 44th Governor of New York — Columbia Law School
Theodore Roosevelt: 26th President of the United States; 25th Vice President of the United States; 33rd Governor of New York; Nobel laureate – Columbia Law School
Wellington Koo: acting President of the Republic of China; judge of the International Court of Justice — Columbia College, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
B. R. Ambedkar: Founding Father of India; architect of the Constitution of India; First Minister of Law and Justice — Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States — Columbia Law School
Neil Gorsuch: Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States — Columbia College
Charles Evans Hughes: 11th Chief Justice of the United States; 44th United States Secretary of State; 35th Governor of New York — Columbia Law School
Harlan Fiske Stone: 12th Chief Justice of the United States; 52nd United States Attorney General — Columbia Law School
William Barr: 77th and 85th United States Attorney General – Columbia College, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Hamilton Fish: 26th United States Secretary of State; United States Senator from New York; 16th Governor of New York — Columbia College
Madeleine Albright: 64th United States Secretary of State; first female Secretary of State — School of International and Public Affairs
Frances Perkins: fourth United States Secretary of Labor; first female member of any U.S. Cabinet — Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Robert A. Millikan: Nobel laureate; measured the elementary electric charge — Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Isidor Isaac Rabi: Nobel Laureate; discovered nuclear magnetic resonance — Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Julian S. Schwinger: Nobel laureate; pioneer of quantum field theory — Columbia College, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Milton Friedman: Nobel laureate, leading member of the Chicago school of economics — Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Simon Kuznets: Nobel laureate; invented concept of GDP; Milton Friedman's doctoral advisor — School of General Studies, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Alan Greenspan: 13th Chair of the Federal Reserve — Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Warren Buffett: CEO of Berkshire Hathaway; one of the world's wealthiest people — Columbia Business School
Herman Hollerith: inventor; co-founder of IBM – School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Robert Kraft: billionaire; owner of the New England Patriots; chairman and CEO of the Kraft Group — Columbia College
Richard Rodgers: legendary Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony award-winning composer; Pulitzer Prize winner — Columbia College
Langston Hughes: Harlem Renaissance poet, novelist, and playwright — School of Engineering and Applied Science
Zora Neale Hurston: Harlem Renaissance author, anthropologist, and filmmaker — Barnard College, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Allen Ginsberg: poet; founder of the Beat Generation — Columbia College
Jack Kerouac: poet; founder of the Beat Generation — Columbia College
Isaac Asimov: science fiction writer; biochemist — School of General Studies, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
J. D. Salinger: novelist, The Catcher in the Rye — School of General Studies
Amelia Earhart: first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean — School of General Studies
Jake Gyllenhaal: actor and film producer — Columbia College
Zbigniew Brzezinski
Sonia Sotomayor
Kimberlé Crenshaw
Lee Bollinger
Franz Boas
Margaret Mead
Edward Sapir
John Dewey
Charles A. Beard
Max Horkheimer
Herbert Marcuse
Edward Said
Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak
Orhan Pamuk
Edwin Howard Armstrong
Enrico Fermi
Chien-Shiung Wu
Tsung-Dao Lee
Jack Steinberger
Joachim Frank
Joseph Stiglitz
Jeffrey Sachs
Robert Mundell
Thomas Hunt Morgan
Eric Kandel
Richard Axel
Andrei Okounkov

Columbia University (also known as Columbia, and officially as Columbia University in the City of New York) is a private Ivy League research university in New York City.

Filming a period movie in the East Village using antique police cars. New York is an accommodating filming location and frequent storyline setting.

Media in New York City

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Filming a period movie in the East Village using antique police cars. New York is an accommodating filming location and frequent storyline setting.
Straphangers use newspapers on New York's mass transit system.

New York City has been called the media capital of the world.