New York City

New Amsterdam, centered in the eventual Lower Manhattan, in 1664, the year England took control and renamed it "New York"
Fort George and the City of New York c. 1731. Royal Navy ships of the line are seen guarding what would become New York Harbor.
Columbia University was founded by royal charter in 1754 under the name of King's College.
The Battle of Long Island, the largest battle of the American Revolution, took place in Brooklyn in 1776.
Broadway follows the Native American Wickquasgeck Trail through Manhattan.
The current 5 boroughs of Greater New York as they appeared in 1814. Bronx was in Westchester County, Queens County included modern Nassau County, Kings County had 6 towns, one of which was Brooklyn, New York City is shown by hatching in southern New York County on the island of Manhattan, and Richmond County on Staten Island.
A construction worker atop the Empire State Building as it was being built in 1930. The Chrysler Building is behind him.
Manhattan's Little Italy, Lower East Side, circa 1900
The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement
United Airlines Flight 175 hits the South Tower of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.
The core of the New York City metropolitan area, with Manhattan Island at its center
Lower and Midtown Manhattan, as seen by a SkySat satellite in 2017
Central Park in Winter by Raymond Speers, in Munsey's Magazine, February 1900
Flushing Meadows–Corona Park was used in both the 1939 and 1964 New York World's Fair, with the Unisphere as the centerpiece of the latter and which remains today.
The Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island in New York Harbor is a symbol of the United States and its ideals of freedom, democracy, and opportunity.
View of The Pond and Midtown Manhattan from the Gapstow Bridge in Central Park, one of the world's most visited tourist attractions, in 2019
California sea lions play at the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
A map of racial distribution in New York, 2010 U.S. census. Each dot is 25 people:
The landmark Neo-Gothic Roman Catholic St. Patrick's Cathedral, Midtown Manhattan
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish residents in Brooklyn. Brooklyn has the largest Jewish community in the United States, with approximately 600,000 individuals.
The Islamic Cultural Center of New York in Upper Manhattan was the first mosque built in New York City.
Ganesh Temple in Flushing, Queens, is the oldest Hindu temple in the Western Hemisphere.
The New York Stock Exchange, by a significant margin the world's largest stock exchange per market capitalization of its listed companies, at US$23.1 trillion as of April 2018. Pictured is the exchange's building on Wall Street.
The Deutsche Bank Center as viewed from Central Park West
Times Square is the hub of the Broadway theater district and a media center. It also has one of the highest annual attendance rates of any tourist attraction in the world, estimated at 50 million.
The I Love New York logo, designed by Milton Glaser in 1977
Rockefeller Center is home to NBC Studios.
Times Square Studios, home of Good Morning America
Butler Library at Columbia University, described as one of the most beautiful college libraries in the United States
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of both New York University (NYU) and its Greenwich Village neighborhood
New York-Presbyterian Hospital, affiliated with Columbia University and Cornell University, the largest hospital and largest private employer in New York City and one of the world's busiest
The New York Police Department (NYPD) is the largest police force in the United States.
Police officers of New York Police Department (NYPD)
The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) is the largest municipal fire department in the United States.
The Stephen A. Schwarzman Headquarters Building of the New York Public Library, at 5th Avenue and 42nd Street
The fast-paced streets of New York City, January 2020
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, part of Museum Mile, is one of the largest museums in the world.
Smorgasburg opened in 2011 as an open-air food market and is part of the Brooklyn Flea.
As of 2012, the city had about 6,000 hybrid taxis (shown) in service, the largest number of any city in North America.
New York City Hall is the oldest City Hall in the United States that still houses its original governmental functions.
The New York County Courthouse houses the New York Supreme Court and other offices.
Eric Adams, the current and 110th Mayor of New York City
New York City is home to the two busiest train stations in the U.S., including Grand Central Terminal.
The New York City Subway is the world's largest rapid transit system by number of stations.
The Port Authority Bus Terminal, the world's busiest bus station, at 8th Avenue and 42nd Street
John F. Kennedy Airport in Queens, the busiest international air passenger gateway to the United States
The Staten Island Ferry shuttles commuters between Manhattan and Staten Island.
Yellow medallion taxicabs are widely recognized icons of the city.
8th Avenue, looking northward ("uptown"). Most streets and avenues in Manhattan's grid plan incorporate a one-way traffic configuration.
The George Washington Bridge, connecting Upper Manhattan (background) from Fort Lee, New Jersey across the Hudson River, is the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge.
The growing skyline of Long Island City, Queens (background),<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-10-30/nyc-s-fastest-growing-neighborhood-gets-180-million-investment|title=NYC's Fastest-Growing Neighborhood Gets $180 Million Investment|first=Henry|last=Goldman|date=October 30, 2018|publisher=Bloomberg L.P|access-date=October 30, 2018}}</ref> facing the East River and Manhattan in May 2017
The Grand Concourse in the Bronx, foreground, with Manhattan in the background in February 2018
St. George, Staten Island as seen from the Staten Island Ferry, the world's busiest passenger-only ferry system, shuttling passengers between Manhattan and Staten Island

Most populous city in the United States.

- New York City

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East River

A navigation map for Hell Gate from c. 1885, after many of the obstructions had been removed.
A map from 1781
A "bird's-eye" view of New York City from 1859; Wallabout Bay and the East River are in the foreground, the Hudson River and New York Bay in the background
James E. Serrell's plan for an expanded Manhattan and a straightened East River
The excavations and tunnels used to undermine Hallert's Point
Firefighters working to put out the fire on the listing General Slocum
A panorama of the suspension section of the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (left) and the Hell Gate Bridge (right), as seen from Astoria Park in Queens
Exposition display showing cross-section of East River railroad tunnel to Pennsylvania Station
William Glackens's 1902 painting of East River Park, in the Brooklyn Museum
A "shot tower" at 53rd Street in Manhattan on the East River (1831)
Blackwells Island from Eighty Sixth Street, Currier & Ives (1862); Blackwell's Island is now known as Roosevelt Island
Manhattan Bridge (top) and Brooklyn Bridge (bottom); Manhattan is on the left, Brooklyn on the right (1981)
The East River passes children playing football in East River Park (2008)
Powell's Cove, in Whitestone, Queens (2009)
The East River flows past the Upper East Side (2009)
The East River with Brooklyn Heights in the background, Topsail Schooner Clipper City (2013)
The East River and Lower Manhattan (2013)

The East River is a salt water tidal estuary in New York City.

The current 5 boroughs of Greater New York as they appeared in 1814. Bronx was in Westchester County, Queens County included modern Nassau County, Kings County had 6 towns, one of which was Brooklyn, and New York City is shown by hatching in lower Manhattan.

Boroughs of New York City

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[[File:5 Boroughs Labels New York City Map.svg|thumb|right|300px|

The current 5 boroughs of Greater New York as they appeared in 1814. Bronx was in Westchester County, Queens County included modern Nassau County, Kings County had 6 towns, one of which was Brooklyn, and New York City is shown by hatching in lower Manhattan.
Chinatown in Manhattan, the most densely populated borough of New York City, with a higher density than any individual American city.
Landmark 19th-century brownstones in the Greenpoint Historic District of Brooklyn, New York City's most populous borough.
The Unisphere in Queens, the most ethnically diverse urban area in the world.
The Bronx, the northernmost borough of New York City and the only borough situated on the United States mainland.
Borough Hall in the St. George neighborhood of Staten Island, the most suburban borough of New York City.
The percentage of New York City population residing in each borough (from bottom to top):
 1. Manhattan ,
 2. Brooklyn ,
 3. Queens ,
 4. The Bronx, and
 5. Staten Island . Populations before 1898 are for the areas now enclosed in the present boroughs.

New York City is composed of five boroughs: The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island.

Chicago

Traditional Potawatomi regalia on display at the Field Museum of Natural History
An artist's rendering of the Great Chicago Fire of 1871
Court of Honor at the World's Columbian Exposition in 1893
Men outside a soup kitchen during the Great Depression (1931)
Boy from Chicago, 1941
Protesters in Grant Park outside the 1968 Democratic National Convention
Downtown and the North Side with beaches lining the waterfront
A satellite image of Chicago
Community areas of the City of Chicago
The Chicago Building (1904–05) is a prime example of the Chicago School, displaying both variations of the Chicago window.
Replica of Daniel Chester French's Statue of the Republic at the site of the World's Columbian Exposition
Downtown Chicago and the Chicago River during January 2014 cold wave
Map of racial distribution in Chicago, 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people:
Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
The Chicago Board of Trade Building
The National Hellenic Museum in Greektown is one of several ethnic museums comprising the Chicago Cultural Alliance.
A Chicago jazz club
The Chicago Theatre
The spire of the Copernicus Center is modeled on the Royal Castle in Warsaw.
Jay Pritzker Pavilion by night
Ferries offer sightseeing tours and water-taxi transportation along the Chicago River and Lake Michigan.
Aerial view of Navy Pier at night
The Magnificent Mile hosts numerous upscale stores, as well as landmarks like the Chicago Water Tower.
Chicago-style stuffed pizza
A Polish market in Chicago
Carl Sandburg's most famous description of the city is as "Hog Butcher for the World/Tool Maker, Stacker of Wheat/ Player with Railroads and the Nation's Freight Handler,/ Stormy, Husky, Brawling, City of the Big Shoulders."
Chicago Half Marathon on Lake Shore Drive on the South Side
Daley Plaza with Picasso statue, City Hall in background. At right, the Daley Plaza Building contains the state law courts.
Chicago Police Department SUV, 2011
When it was opened in 1991, the central Harold Washington Library appeared in Guinness World Records as the largest municipal public library building in the world.
The University of Chicago, as seen from the Midway Plaisance
WGN began in the early days of radio and developed into a multi-platform broadcaster, including a cable television super-station.
The former Harpo Studios in West Loop, Chicago was home of The Oprah Winfrey Show from 1986 until 2011 and other Harpo Production operations until 2015.
Aerial photo of the Jane Byrne Interchange, opened in the 1960s
Chicago Union Station, opened in 1925, is the third-busiest passenger rail terminal in the United States.
Amtrak train on the Empire Builder route departs Chicago from Union Station
O'Hare International Airport
Prentice Women's Hospital on the Northwestern Memorial Hospital Downtown Campus

Chicago (, locally also ), officially the City of Chicago, is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Illinois, and the third-most populous city in the United States, following New York City and Los Angeles.

Daytime scene on Broadway Broadway.png Broadway through Manhattan, the Bronx and lower Westchester County is highlighted in red

Broadway (Manhattan)

Not to be confused with East Broadway or West Broadway, both also in Manhattan, or with Broadway theatre, commonly referred to as "Broadway".

Not to be confused with East Broadway or West Broadway, both also in Manhattan, or with Broadway theatre, commonly referred to as "Broadway".

Daytime scene on Broadway Broadway.png Broadway through Manhattan, the Bronx and lower Westchester County is highlighted in red
Broadway in 1834
Broadway in 1860
Somerindyke House, Bloomingdale Road, middle 19th century
Looking north from Broome Street (circa 1853–55)
In 1885, the Broadway commercial district was overrun with telephone, telegraph, and electrical lines. This view was north from Cortlandt and Maiden Lane.
The segment of Broadway in Times Square
A view up Broadway from Bowling Green, with the Chrysler Building visible in the background
A view of Broadway in 1909
Broadway looking north from 48th Street in the Theater District
X-shaped intersection of Broadway (from lower right to upper left) and Amsterdam Avenue (lower left to upper right), looking north from Sherman Square to West 72nd Street and the treetops of Verdi Square
Broadway at Dyckman Street in Inwood
North Broadway (U.S. 9) in Yonkers
The Washington Irving Memorial on North Broadway in Irvington, not far from Irving's home, Sunnyside
Canyon of Heroes during a ticker-tape parade for the Apollo 11 astronauts on August 13, 1969
Broadway under the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line's elevated structure in the Bronx
Plan of 1868 for an "arcade railway"
International Mercantile Marine Company Building

Broadway runs from State Street at Bowling Green for 13 mi through the borough of Manhattan and 2 mi through the Bronx, exiting north from New York City to run an additional 18 mi through the Westchester County municipalities of Yonkers, Hastings-On-Hudson, Dobbs Ferry, Irvington, and Tarrytown, and terminating north of Sleepy Hollow.

New Netherland

17th-century colonial province of the Dutch Republic that was located on what is now the East Coast of the United States.

17th-century colonial province of the Dutch Republic that was located on what is now the East Coast of the United States.

New Netherland map published by Nicolaes Visscher II (1649–1702)
Map based on Adriaen Block's 1614 expedition to New Netherland, featuring the first use of the name. It was created by Dutch cartographers in the (ca. 1590s–1720s) and Netherlandish cartography (ca. 1570s–1670s).
New Netherland map published by Nicolaes Visscher II (1649–1702)
Map of New Netherland and New England, with north to the right
The West India House in Amsterdam, headquarters of the Dutch West India Company from 1623 to 1647
The storehouse of the Dutch West India Company in Amsterdam, built in 1642, became the headquarters of the board in 1647 because of financial difficulties after the loss of Dutch Brazil.
Map showing the area claimed by the Dutch in North-America and several Dutch settlements, against modern state boundaries
Map (c. 1639), Manhattan situated on the North River (North arrow pointing to the right)
St. Mark's Church in-the-Bowery, site of Stuyvesant's grave
Nicolaes Visscher I (1618–1679), Novi Belgii Novæque Angliæ, reprint of 1685 which is not a completely correct representation of the situation at the time. The border with New England had been adjusted to 50 mi west of the Fresh River, while the Lange Eylandt towns west of Oyster Bay were under Dutch jurisdiction.
Image of " " made in 1664, the year that it was surrendered to English forces under Richard Nicolls
The original settlement has grown into the largest metropolis in the United States, seen here in 2006
The Prinsenvlag or "Prince's Flag", featuring the blue, white, and orange of some flags in the region
The Noort Rivier was one of the three main rivers in New Netherland.

It was during the early British colonial period that the New Netherlanders actually developed the land and society that had an enduring impact on the Capital District, the Hudson Valley, North Jersey, western Long Island, New York City, Fairfield County, and ultimately the United States.

Randel's surveying bolt

Central Park

Randel's surveying bolt
Map of the former Seneca Village from Viele's survey for Central Park
The Lake, one of the first features of Central Park to be completed
Bethesda Terrace and Fountain under construction in 1862
Gentry in the new park, c. undefined 1870
Belvedere Castle, completed 1869
Lower end of the mall, seen in 1901
East side of Rat Rock
Wooded area of the Ramble
Female northern cardinal, one of the bird species found in Central Park
The USS Maine National Monument
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Bethesda Terrace and Fountain
Gapstow Bridge in fall
Angel of the Waters (1873) in Bethesda Fountain
Cleopatra's Needle, the park's oldest man-made structure
Horse-drawn carriage by the park
Summerstage features free musical concerts throughout the summer.
Entrance to the Fifth Avenue–59th Street subway station just outside Central Park
66th Street transverse
Center Drive in Central Park
North Woods, one of several places where crimes were reported during the 1989 Central Park jogger case
Sheep Meadow, a common place for gatherings
Skyscrapers abut the southern border of Central Park.

Central Park is an urban park in New York City, between the Upper West and Upper East Sides of Manhattan.

Jersey City, New Jersey

Second-most populous city in the U.S. state of New Jersey, after Newark.

Second-most populous city in the U.S. state of New Jersey, after Newark.

Panorama of Jersey City in 1854
Jersey City Skyline as viewed from Staten Island Ferry at Sunset – July 2016
View of Jersey City from the northwest. Lower Manhattan is in the background.
Satellite view of Jersey City
Liberty Island and Liberty State Park
The 6 Wards of Jersey City
Pershing Field entrance in The Heights
India Square, in the Bombay neighborhood of Jersey City, is home to the highest concentration of Asian Indians in the Western Hemisphere.
Filipino grocery store in Jersey City
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Statue of Liberty
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Morgan Branch Library, home of the Afro-American Historical and Cultural Society Museum
City Hall, on Grove Street
The Yanitelli Center on the campus of Saint Peter's University
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French American Academy on 3rd Street
Central Railroad of New Jersey Terminal
Hudson-Bergen Light Rail
I-78, the New Jersey Turnpike Newark Bay Extension, westbound at Exit 14B in Jersey City
Entrance to the Holland Tunnel, which carries high amounts of vehicular traffic from New Jersey to Lower Manhattan
East Coast Greenway dedication ceremony

According to the Köppen climate classification system, Jersey City has a humid subtropical climate in which, its climate is similar to its parallel cities like Newark and New York City, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.

Newark, New Jersey

Most populous city in the U.S. state of New Jersey and the seat of Essex County and part of the New York metropolitan area.

Most populous city in the U.S. state of New Jersey and the seat of Essex County and part of the New York metropolitan area.

The Krueger-Scott Mansion, owned by African-American beauty entrepreneur Louise Scott, Newark's first female millionaire, and previously by German brewer Gottfried Krueger
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Mt. Olive AME Church
Downtown Newark at sunset
NJ Transit headquarters
Port Newark with New Jersey Turnpike in foreground
The base of the Wars of America (1926) monument at Military Park, created by the sculptor of Mount Rushmore to honor America's war dead. "The design represents a great spearhead. Upon the green field of this spearhead we have placed a Tudor sword, the hilt of which represents the American nation at a crisis, answering the call to arms."-- sculptor Gutzon Borglum
New Jersey Performing Arts Center
Newark Symphony Hall
Three buildings of The Newark Museum of Art
Congregation Ahavas Sholom
Grammy Museum Experience
Wars Of America by Mt. Rushmore sculptor Gutzon Borglum in Military Park
Orange boardwalk in Riverfront Park and Jackson Street Bridge
Weequahic Lake in Weequahic Park
Branch Brook Park in the North Ward of Newark
Headquarters of The Star-Ledger
With a studio on the 6th floor and showy antenna on the roof, Bamberger's launched WOR to sell more radios.
NJTV transmitter at Montclair State University
Film production in Newark, 2004
Prudential Center
Newark Public Schools headquarters
Science Park High School
Former Engine 8 firehouse in the Ironbound neighborhood
Newark Police 2nd Precinct complex
New York City and Jersey City skylines as seen from Newark Liberty International Airport
Newark Trolley line on Market Street near the present-day courthouse
View south along the New Jersey Turnpike/Interstate 95 approaching the exit for Interstate 78, U.S. Route 1 and U.S. Route 9 in Newark
Newark Light Rail
Newark Penn Station

The advantages of Newark included proximity to New York City, lower land costs, tech labor force and higher education institutions, a major airport, and fiber optic networks.

Nighttime aerial view of much of Nassau County, from the west-northwest; Hempstead is in the center, with roads projecting out in various directions; bridges to Jones Beach Island are at the upper right. The Grand Central Parkway–Cross Island Parkway interchange, barely visible at the lower left, is just outside the county, within Queens.

Nassau County, New York

County in the U.S. state of New York.

County in the U.S. state of New York.

Nighttime aerial view of much of Nassau County, from the west-northwest; Hempstead is in the center, with roads projecting out in various directions; bridges to Jones Beach Island are at the upper right. The Grand Central Parkway–Cross Island Parkway interchange, barely visible at the lower left, is just outside the county, within Queens.
A Nassau County Auxiliary Police car
Hicksville fire department
The Theodore Roosevelt County Executive and Legislative Building
The Nassau County Courthouse
The United States Merchant Marine Academy
Hofstra University Student Center
A pre-race post parade at Belmont Park in 1999
The golf course at Bethpage State Park

In 1683, the colonial territory of Yorkshire was dissolved, Suffolk County and Queens County were established, and the local seat of government was moved west from Hempstead to Jamaica (now in New York City).

Hudson County municipalities index map

Hudson County, New Jersey

Densely populated county in the U.S. state of New Jersey.

Densely populated county in the U.S. state of New Jersey.

Hudson County municipalities index map
Satellite image showing the core of the New York metropolitan area. Over 10 million people live in the imaged area. Much of Hudson County is located on the peninsula at left.
Midtown Manhattan, seen across the Hudson River from Hoboken at night
Hudson County and the Palisades, viewed across the Hudson River from Manhattan in the afternoon. The glass building visible is the Javits Center.
A map of the Hudson River Valley c. 1635 (North is to the right) Hudson County is called Oesters Eylandt, or Oyster Island
Alexander Hamilton fights his fatal duel with Aaron Burr.
Hudson Waterfront, circa 1900
Immigrants arriving at Ellis Island, 1902
Bergenline Avenue then and now: Facing south toward 32nd Street, circa 1900 (left), and in 2010 (right).
Bayonne Bridge at sunset
New Jersey-New York border in the newly constructed Holland Tunnel.
Roosevelt Stadium entrance circa 1940
India Square, Jersey City, known as Bombaytown or Little Bombay, home to the highest concentration of Asian Indians in the Western Hemisphere.
Justice William J. Brennan Jr. Courthouse
Administration Building
Edwin A. Stevens Building
Bergenline Station at 49th Street between Bergenline Avenue and Kennedy Boulevard at the border of Union City, West New York and North Bergen
Exchange Place
CRRNJ Terminal in Liberty State Park, with ferry slips in foreground
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Liberty Science Center in Liberty State Park, Jersey City

Given its proximity to Manhattan, it is sometimes referred to as New York City's sixth borough.