A report on New York City

New Amsterdam, centered in the eventual Lower Manhattan, in 1664, the year England took control and renamed it "New York"
Fort George and the City of New York c. 1731. Royal Navy ships of the line are seen guarding what would become New York Harbor.
Columbia University was founded by royal charter in 1754 under the name of King's College.
The Battle of Long Island, the largest battle of the American Revolution, took place in Brooklyn in 1776.
Broadway follows the Native American Wickquasgeck Trail through Manhattan.
The current 5 boroughs of Greater New York as they appeared in 1814. Bronx was in Westchester County, Queens County included modern Nassau County, Kings County had 6 towns, one of which was Brooklyn, New York City is shown by hatching in southern New York County on the island of Manhattan, and Richmond County on Staten Island.
A construction worker atop the Empire State Building as it was being built in 1930. The Chrysler Building is behind him.
Manhattan's Little Italy, Lower East Side, circa 1900
The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement
United Airlines Flight 175 hits the South Tower of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.
The core of the New York City metropolitan area, with Manhattan Island at its center
Lower and Midtown Manhattan, as seen by a SkySat satellite in 2017
Central Park in Winter by Raymond Speers, in Munsey's Magazine, February 1900
Flushing Meadows–Corona Park was used in both the 1939 and 1964 New York World's Fair, with the Unisphere as the centerpiece of the latter and which remains today.
The Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island in New York Harbor is a symbol of the United States and its ideals of freedom, democracy, and opportunity.
View of The Pond and Midtown Manhattan from the Gapstow Bridge in Central Park, one of the world's most visited tourist attractions, in 2019
California sea lions play at the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
A map of racial distribution in New York, 2010 U.S. census. Each dot is 25 people:
The landmark Neo-Gothic Roman Catholic St. Patrick's Cathedral, Midtown Manhattan
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish residents in Brooklyn. Brooklyn has the largest Jewish community in the United States, with approximately 600,000 individuals.
The Islamic Cultural Center of New York in Upper Manhattan was the first mosque built in New York City.
Ganesh Temple in Flushing, Queens, is the oldest Hindu temple in the Western Hemisphere.
The New York Stock Exchange, by a significant margin the world's largest stock exchange per market capitalization of its listed companies, at US$23.1 trillion as of April 2018. Pictured is the exchange's building on Wall Street.
The Deutsche Bank Center as viewed from Central Park West
Times Square is the hub of the Broadway theater district and a media center. It also has one of the highest annual attendance rates of any tourist attraction in the world, estimated at 50 million.
The I Love New York logo, designed by Milton Glaser in 1977
Rockefeller Center is home to NBC Studios.
Times Square Studios, home of Good Morning America
Butler Library at Columbia University, described as one of the most beautiful college libraries in the United States
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of both New York University (NYU) and its Greenwich Village neighborhood
New York-Presbyterian Hospital, affiliated with Columbia University and Cornell University, the largest hospital and largest private employer in New York City and one of the world's busiest
The New York Police Department (NYPD) is the largest police force in the United States.
Police officers of New York Police Department (NYPD)
The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) is the largest municipal fire department in the United States.
The Stephen A. Schwarzman Headquarters Building of the New York Public Library, at 5th Avenue and 42nd Street
The fast-paced streets of New York City, January 2020
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, part of Museum Mile, is one of the largest museums in the world.
Smorgasburg opened in 2011 as an open-air food market and is part of the Brooklyn Flea.
As of 2012, the city had about 6,000 hybrid taxis (shown) in service, the largest number of any city in North America.
New York City Hall is the oldest City Hall in the United States that still houses its original governmental functions.
The New York County Courthouse houses the New York Supreme Court and other offices.
Eric Adams, the current and 110th Mayor of New York City
New York City is home to the two busiest train stations in the U.S., including Grand Central Terminal.
The New York City Subway is the world's largest rapid transit system by number of stations.
The Port Authority Bus Terminal, the world's busiest bus station, at 8th Avenue and 42nd Street
John F. Kennedy Airport in Queens, the busiest international air passenger gateway to the United States
The Staten Island Ferry shuttles commuters between Manhattan and Staten Island.
Yellow medallion taxicabs are widely recognized icons of the city.
8th Avenue, looking northward ("uptown"). Most streets and avenues in Manhattan's grid plan incorporate a one-way traffic configuration.
The George Washington Bridge, connecting Upper Manhattan (background) from Fort Lee, New Jersey across the Hudson River, is the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge.
The growing skyline of Long Island City, Queens (background),<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-10-30/nyc-s-fastest-growing-neighborhood-gets-180-million-investment|title=NYC's Fastest-Growing Neighborhood Gets $180 Million Investment|first=Henry|last=Goldman|date=October 30, 2018|publisher=Bloomberg L.P|access-date=October 30, 2018}}</ref> facing the East River and Manhattan in May 2017
The Grand Concourse in the Bronx, foreground, with Manhattan in the background in February 2018
St. George, Staten Island as seen from the Staten Island Ferry, the world's busiest passenger-only ferry system, shuttling passengers between Manhattan and Staten Island
The Asia gate entrance to the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
The Spanish Harlem Orchestra. New York City is home to nearly 3 million Latino Americans, the largest Hispanic population of any city outside Latin America and Spain.
The Financial District of Lower Manhattan including Wall Street, the world's principal financial center

Most populous city in the United States.

- New York City

574 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Hudson Valley

7 links

The Hudson Valley (also known as the Hudson River Valley) comprises the valley of the Hudson River and its adjacent communities in the U.S. state of New York.

The Hudson Valley (also known as the Hudson River Valley) comprises the valley of the Hudson River and its adjacent communities in the U.S. state of New York.

Map of Washington's retreat through New York and New Jersey
Robert Havell, Jr., View of the Hudson River from Tarrytown, c. 1866
The Stone Barns Center for Food & Agriculture is a leading nonprofit farm and educational center in the region.
The main laboratory building of the IBM Watson Research Center is located in Yorktown Heights.
Upper Hudson (light yellow),
Mid-Hudson (green),
Lower Hudson (blue)
The Mid-Hudson Bridge, connecting Poughkeepsie and Highland
The Yonkers station serves Amtrak intercity trains and Metro-North commuter trains.

The region stretches from the Capital District including Albany and Troy south to Yonkers in Westchester County, bordering New York City.

Theater District, Manhattan

3 links

New York City's Theater District (sometimes spelled Theatre District, and officially zoned as the "Theater Subdistrict" ) is an area and neighborhood in Midtown Manhattan where most Broadway theaters are located, as well as many other theaters, movie theaters, restaurants, hotels, and other places of entertainment.

Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, home venue of the New York Yankees (MLB) and New York City FC (MLS).

Sports in the New York metropolitan area

1 links

Sports in the New York metropolitan area have a long and distinguished history.

Sports in the New York metropolitan area have a long and distinguished history.

Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, home venue of the New York Yankees (MLB) and New York City FC (MLS).
Red Bull Arena is the home venue of the New York Red Bulls (MLS)
The New York City Marathon is the largest marathon in the world (2013 Marathon course).
Fans gather in front of New York City Hall in October, 1986 to celebrate the New York Mets' World Series championship
Pelé played for the New York Cosmos from 1975 to 1977
Hudson River Derby match between the New York Red Bulls and New York City FC
Citi Field, home of the New York Mets in Queens
Madison Square Garden, home of the New York Knicks (NBA) and New York Rangers (NHL) in Manhattan
Barclays Center, home of the Brooklyn Nets (NBA) and New York Liberty (WNBA) in Brooklyn
MetLife Stadium, home to both the New York Giants and the New York Jets
The Nassau Coliseum in Uniondale, was home to the New York Islanders from 1972 to 2015, and the New York Nets from 1972 to 1976.
Shinnecock Hills clubhouse at the 2018 U.S. Open
An extremely rare photo finish triple dead heat, recorded in a 1953 harness race at Freehold Raceway
Vanderbilt Cup race start, 1905
Marathon runners crossing the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge just after race start.
Forest Hills tennis courts in Queens, New York in 1920

New York City is home to the headquarters of the National Football League, the National Hockey League, the National Basketball Association, Major League Baseball, the Women's National Basketball Association, National Women's Hockey League, and Major League Soccer.

Midtown Manhattan in November 2018 looking north from the Empire State Building's 102nd floor (1224 ft). Bank of America Tower, left, then Central Park Tower (under construction), with recently completed 220 Central Park South behind it. In the center and both under construction are 111 West 57th Street and 53W53. On the right is 432 Park Avenue.

List of tallest buildings in New York City

3 links

Midtown Manhattan in November 2018 looking north from the Empire State Building's 102nd floor (1224 ft). Bank of America Tower, left, then Central Park Tower (under construction), with recently completed 220 Central Park South behind it. In the center and both under construction are 111 West 57th Street and 53W53. On the right is 432 Park Avenue.
Lower Manhattan, viewed from Jersey City, New Jersey with the World Trade Center complex in the middle.
Tallest buildings in NYC, by pinnacle height, including all masts, antennae, poles, etc., whether architectural or not

New York City, the most populous city in the United States, is home to over 7,000 completed high-rise buildings of at least 35 m, of which at least 95 are taller than 650 ft. The tallest building in New York is One World Trade Center, which rises 1776 ft.

Columbia University's Low Memorial Library.

Education in New York City

0 links

Provided by a vast number of public and private institutions.

Provided by a vast number of public and private institutions.

Columbia University's Low Memorial Library.
Fordham University's Keating Hall in the Bronx
Brooklyn Law School. The 1994 new classical Fell Hall tower by NYC architect Robert A. M. Stern pictured.
The New York City Department of Education is the largest public school system in the United States.
Rose Reading Room at the New York Public Library Main Branch in Manhattan ([[Media:NYC_Public_Library_Research_Room_Jan_2006.jpg|Full panoramic photo]])
L'Arlésienne (Porträt der Mme Ginoux), by Vincent van Gogh, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art
A dinosaur replica at the American Museum of Natural History

New York City is home to some of the most important libraries, universities, and research centers in the world.

Eggs benedict

Cuisine of New York City

0 links

Eggs benedict
Black and white cookie
Bagel and lox
Challah
Matzo ball soup
Egg cream
Pizza truck in Midtown
Vendor in New York City
An Indian restaurant in Jackson Heights
Clinton St. Baking Company & Restaurant
Serendipity 3 is a popular restaurant in the Upper East Side of Manhattan founded by Stephen Bruce in 1954.

The cuisine of New York City comprises many cuisines belonging to various ethnic groups that have entered the United States through the city.

In the image above, the 2020 presidential results are displayed in New York City for each electoral precinct. The blue represents precincts won by Joe Biden, the Democrat, while precincts won by Donald Trump, the Republican, are colored in red.

Politics of New York City

0 links

In the image above, the 2020 presidential results are displayed in New York City for each electoral precinct. The blue represents precincts won by Joe Biden, the Democrat, while precincts won by Donald Trump, the Republican, are colored in red.
2014 Brooklyn Democratic Party meeting
Three suffragists casting votes in New York City around 1918.
James A. Farley Post Office

The city government of New York City controls a budget of about $78.3 billion a year, as of 2016.

Bin Laden circa 1997–1998

September 11 attacks

15 links

The September 11 attacks, commonly known as 9/11, were a series of four coordinated suicide terrorist attacks carried out by the militant Islamic extremist network al-Qaeda against the United States.

The September 11 attacks, commonly known as 9/11, were a series of four coordinated suicide terrorist attacks carried out by the militant Islamic extremist network al-Qaeda against the United States.

Bin Laden circa 1997–1998
Khalid Sheikh Mohammed after his capture in 2003
Map showing the attacks on the World Trade Center (Planes are not drawn to scale)
Diagram showing the attacks on the World Trade Center
Flight paths of the four planes
Collapse of the towers as seen from across the Hudson River in New Jersey
The north face of Two World Trade Center (South Tower) immediately after being struck by United Airlines Flight 175
World Trade Center site (Ground Zero) with an overlay showing the original building locations
Remains of 6, 7, and 1WTC
on September 17
Aerial view of the Pentagon
Satellite view of New York City on September 12, photographed by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) camera aboard Landsat 7.
A portion of the World Trade Center bathtub at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum
Search and rescue teams inspect the wreckage at Ground Zero on September 13
President George W. Bush is briefed in Sarasota, Florida, where he learned of the attacks unfolding while he was visiting an elementary school.
Vladimir Putin (right) and his then-wife Lyudmila Putina (center) on November 16
U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan
Survivors covered in dust after the collapse of the towers
U.S. deficit and debt increases 2001–2008
Alleged "extraordinary rendition" illegal flights of the CIA, as reported by Rzeczpospolita.
Mohamed Atta, an Egyptian national, was the ringleader of the attacks.
The exterior support columns from the lower level of the South Tower remained standing after the building collapsed.
Rebuilt One World Trade Center nearing completion in July 2013
The United States flag flying at half-staff in New York City on September 11, 2014, the thirteenth anniversary of the attacks.
The Tribute in Light on September 11, 2006, the fifth anniversary of the attacks
Fritz Koenig’s monumental sculpture The Sphere in its final location in Liberty Park

The hijackers successfully crashed the first two planes into the North and South Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City, and the third plane into the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia.

The Battle of Long Island, 1776, by Domenick D'Andrea

Battle of Long Island

12 links

Action of the American Revolutionary War fought on Tuesday, August 27, 1776, at the western edge of Long Island in the present-day Brooklyn, New York.

Action of the American Revolutionary War fought on Tuesday, August 27, 1776, at the western edge of Long Island in the present-day Brooklyn, New York.

The Battle of Long Island, 1776, by Domenick D'Andrea
American strategy called for the first line of defense to be based on the Heights of Guan, a series of hills which stretched northeast across King's County. The main defensive works were a series of forts and entrenchments located in the northwest of the county, in and around Brooklyn. The "Road to Narrows" is the Gowanus Road. No. 5 is the "Old Stone House". Map by Bernard Ratzer based on his 1766–1767 survey.
The British fleet in the lower bay (Harpers Magazine, 1876) depicts the British fleet amassing off the shores of Staten Island in the summer of 1776
British troops in the type of flat-bottomed boat used for the invasion of Long Island. Hessians in their blue uniforms are in the two boats that are only partly visible.
Denyse's Ferry, the first place at which the Hessians and British landed on Long Island August 22, 1776 by A. Brown. This high point overlooking the Narrows was an American artillery position and was bombarded by the British before the invasion, but the actual landing took place farther east at Gravesend Bay (around to the left from the perspective of this illustration) where the conditions were more favorable for the small British boats carrying the troops.
British military map from 1776 showing the marching routes and engagement sites during the Battle of Long Island
Howard's Tavern as it appeared in 1776; it was demolished in 1880. The tavern was located near the present-day intersection of Fulton Street and Jamaica Avenue.
A view from Battle Hill – the highest point in King's County – looking west toward Upper New York Harbor and New Jersey beyond. Here on Lord Stirling's left flank about 300 Americans under Colonel Atlee and General Parsons repulsed successive attacks by the British after taking the hill, and inflicted the highest casualties against the British during the Battle of Long Island.
Battle Pass – also known as "Flatbush Pass" – is located in modern-day Prospect Park. Here General Sullivan and his troops were outflanked by the British who attacked from the rear while the Hessians attacked up Battle Pass. (Lithograph c.1866)
U.S. Army – Artillery Retreat from Long Island 1776 (1899)
Washington evacuating Army 175th Anniversary Issue of 1951. Accurate depiction of Fulton Ferry House at right. Flat-bottomed ferry boats in the East River are depicted in the background.
The Foot of Wall Street And Ferry House – 1746. The Manhattan side of the East River crossing, known then as the Brooklyn Ferry, as it looked in the mid-1700s.
The British fleet in New York Harbor just after the battle
Old Sugar House and Middle Dutch Church c.1830. The Middle Dutch Church is where some of the enlisted men captured at the Battle of Long Island were imprisoned. The Sugar House also became a prison as the British captured more of Washington's soldiers during the retreat from New York. The site today is the location of 28 Liberty Street.
Dongan Oak memorial in Prospect Park

After defeating the British in the siege of Boston on March 17, commander-in-chief George Washington relocated the Continental Army to defend the port city of New York, located at the southern end of Manhattan Island.

New York Harbor/Upper New York Bay in red. It is connected to Lower New York Bay on the south by the Narrows. Ellis Island (north) and Liberty Island (south) are shown in the northwest corner of the bay.

New York Harbor

19 links

At the mouth of the Hudson River where it empties into New York Bay near the East River tidal estuary, and then into the Atlantic Ocean on the east coast of the United States.

At the mouth of the Hudson River where it empties into New York Bay near the East River tidal estuary, and then into the Atlantic Ocean on the east coast of the United States.

New York Harbor/Upper New York Bay in red. It is connected to Lower New York Bay on the south by the Narrows. Ellis Island (north) and Liberty Island (south) are shown in the northwest corner of the bay.
April 2013 view looking southeast: New York Harbor/Upper New York Bay (right), Hudson River (lower left) and East River (upper left)
April 1981 view looking southwest: Wallabout Bay and East River (foreground), Hudson River (at right), Upper New York Bay (left) and Newark Bay in the distance.
New Amsterdam, 1660: early East River docks along left bottom; protective wall against the British on right. West is at top. (Castello Plan redraft)
New York Harbor from the Brooklyn Bridge, 1893
A U.S. sailor's album snapshot of a railroad car float in the harbor, 1919
Convoy out of Brooklyn, February 1942, probably bound for Liverpool (photographed from a blimp from NAS Lakehurst)
Port Newark is seen in the foreground looking northeast across the Newark Bay
Hudson River estuary waterways: 1. Hudson River, 2. East River, 3. Long Island Sound, 4. Newark Bay, 5. Upper New York Bay, 6. Lower New York Bay, 7. Jamaica Bay, 8. Atlantic Ocean
Manhattan, across the bay from Liberty State Park
Robbins Reef Light, MOTBY, and Port Jersey
Liberty Weekend 1986
Ellis Island
The Statue of Liberty

It is also known as Upper New York Bay, which is enclosed by the New York City boroughs of Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Staten Island and the Hudson County, New Jersey, municipalities of Jersey City and Bayonne.