New York City

New Amsterdam, centered in the eventual Lower Manhattan, in 1664, the year England took control and renamed it "New York"
Fort George and the City of New York c. 1731. Royal Navy ships of the line are seen guarding what would become New York Harbor.
Columbia University was founded by royal charter in 1754 under the name of King's College.
The Battle of Long Island, the largest battle of the American Revolution, took place in Brooklyn in 1776.
Broadway follows the Native American Wickquasgeck Trail through Manhattan.
The current 5 boroughs of Greater New York as they appeared in 1814. Bronx was in Westchester County, Queens County included modern Nassau County, Kings County had 6 towns, one of which was Brooklyn, New York City is shown by hatching in southern New York County on the island of Manhattan, and Richmond County on Staten Island.
A construction worker atop the Empire State Building as it was being built in 1930. The Chrysler Building is behind him.
Manhattan's Little Italy, Lower East Side, circa 1900
The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement
United Airlines Flight 175 hits the South Tower of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.
The core of the New York City metropolitan area, with Manhattan Island at its center
Lower and Midtown Manhattan, as seen by a SkySat satellite in 2017
Central Park in Winter by Raymond Speers, in Munsey's Magazine, February 1900
Flushing Meadows–Corona Park was used in both the 1939 and 1964 New York World's Fair, with the Unisphere as the centerpiece of the latter and which remains today.
The Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island in New York Harbor is a symbol of the United States and its ideals of freedom, democracy, and opportunity.
View of The Pond and Midtown Manhattan from the Gapstow Bridge in Central Park, one of the world's most visited tourist attractions, in 2019
California sea lions play at the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
A map of racial distribution in New York, 2010 U.S. census. Each dot is 25 people:
The landmark Neo-Gothic Roman Catholic St. Patrick's Cathedral, Midtown Manhattan
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish residents in Brooklyn. Brooklyn has the largest Jewish community in the United States, with approximately 600,000 individuals.
The Islamic Cultural Center of New York in Upper Manhattan was the first mosque built in New York City.
Ganesh Temple in Flushing, Queens, is the oldest Hindu temple in the Western Hemisphere.
The New York Stock Exchange, by a significant margin the world's largest stock exchange per market capitalization of its listed companies, at US$23.1 trillion as of April 2018. Pictured is the exchange's building on Wall Street.
The Deutsche Bank Center as viewed from Central Park West
Times Square is the hub of the Broadway theater district and a media center. It also has one of the highest annual attendance rates of any tourist attraction in the world, estimated at 50 million.
The I Love New York logo, designed by Milton Glaser in 1977
Rockefeller Center is home to NBC Studios.
Times Square Studios, home of Good Morning America
Butler Library at Columbia University, described as one of the most beautiful college libraries in the United States
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of both New York University (NYU) and its Greenwich Village neighborhood
New York-Presbyterian Hospital, affiliated with Columbia University and Cornell University, the largest hospital and largest private employer in New York City and one of the world's busiest
The New York Police Department (NYPD) is the largest police force in the United States.
Police officers of New York Police Department (NYPD)
The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) is the largest municipal fire department in the United States.
The Stephen A. Schwarzman Headquarters Building of the New York Public Library, at 5th Avenue and 42nd Street
The fast-paced streets of New York City, January 2020
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, part of Museum Mile, is one of the largest museums in the world.
Smorgasburg opened in 2011 as an open-air food market and is part of the Brooklyn Flea.
As of 2012, the city had about 6,000 hybrid taxis (shown) in service, the largest number of any city in North America.
New York City Hall is the oldest City Hall in the United States that still houses its original governmental functions.
The New York County Courthouse houses the New York Supreme Court and other offices.
Eric Adams, the current and 110th Mayor of New York City
New York City is home to the two busiest train stations in the U.S., including Grand Central Terminal.
The New York City Subway is the world's largest rapid transit system by number of stations.
The Port Authority Bus Terminal, the world's busiest bus station, at 8th Avenue and 42nd Street
John F. Kennedy Airport in Queens, the busiest international air passenger gateway to the United States
The Staten Island Ferry shuttles commuters between Manhattan and Staten Island.
Yellow medallion taxicabs are widely recognized icons of the city.
8th Avenue, looking northward ("uptown"). Most streets and avenues in Manhattan's grid plan incorporate a one-way traffic configuration.
The George Washington Bridge, connecting Upper Manhattan (background) from Fort Lee, New Jersey across the Hudson River, is the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge.
The growing skyline of Long Island City, Queens (background),<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-10-30/nyc-s-fastest-growing-neighborhood-gets-180-million-investment|title=NYC's Fastest-Growing Neighborhood Gets $180 Million Investment|first=Henry|last=Goldman|date=October 30, 2018|publisher=Bloomberg L.P|access-date=October 30, 2018}}</ref> facing the East River and Manhattan in May 2017
The Grand Concourse in the Bronx, foreground, with Manhattan in the background in February 2018
St. George, Staten Island as seen from the Staten Island Ferry, the world's busiest passenger-only ferry system, shuttling passengers between Manhattan and Staten Island

Most populous city in the United States.

- New York City

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Hudson Valley

The Hudson Valley (also known as the Hudson River Valley) comprises the valley of the Hudson River and its adjacent communities in the U.S. state of New York.

The Hudson Valley (also known as the Hudson River Valley) comprises the valley of the Hudson River and its adjacent communities in the U.S. state of New York.

Map of Washington's retreat through New York and New Jersey
Robert Havell, Jr., View of the Hudson River from Tarrytown, c. 1866
The Stone Barns Center for Food & Agriculture is a leading nonprofit farm and educational center in the region.
The main laboratory building of the IBM Watson Research Center is located in Yorktown Heights.
Upper Hudson (light yellow),
Mid-Hudson (green),
Lower Hudson (blue)
The Mid-Hudson Bridge, connecting Poughkeepsie and Highland
The Yonkers station serves Amtrak intercity trains and Metro-North commuter trains.

The region stretches from the Capital District including Albany and Troy south to Yonkers in Westchester County, bordering New York City.

Manhattan in 1873, looking north. The Hudson River is at left. The Brooklyn Bridge across the East River (at right) was built from 1870–1883.

History of New York City

The written history of New York City began with the first European explorer, the Italian Giovanni da Verrazzano in 1524.

The written history of New York City began with the first European explorer, the Italian Giovanni da Verrazzano in 1524.

Manhattan in 1873, looking north. The Hudson River is at left. The Brooklyn Bridge across the East River (at right) was built from 1870–1883.
1627 letter in Dutch by Pieter Schaghen stating the purchase of Manhattan for 60 guilders.
New Amsterdam in 1664
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View of New York Harbor, c. 1770
George Washington enters New York in triumph following the British evacuation of America.
Norman Friend. Sidney's Map Twelve Miles Around New York, 1849. Chromo lithograph, Brooklyn Museum
Broadway at 42nd St. in 1898
King's Color-graphs of New York City (1910)
New York's Singer Building was the world's tallest building when completed in 1908. It was demolished in 1968.
Mulberry Street, on the Lower East Side, circa 1900
The skyscraper epitomized New York's success of the early 20th century; it was home to the tallest building between 1908 and 1974.
arriving in New York Harbor with thousands of U.S. troops

The "Sons of Liberty" campaigned against British authority in New York City, and the Stamp Act Congress of representatives from throughout the Thirteen Colonies met in the city in 1765 to organize resistance to Crown policies.

Hudson River

315 mi river that flows from north to south primarily through eastern New York in the United States.

315 mi river that flows from north to south primarily through eastern New York in the United States.

The Hudson River Watershed, including the Hudson and Mohawk rivers
The mouth of the Hudson (yellow), located between Jersey City and New York City
The Hudson River flowing out of Henderson Lake in Tahawus
The river from Poughkeepsie, looking north.
The river between Hudson Waterfront in New Jersey (left) and Manhattan (right)
The bulk carrier Nord Angel breaking ice on the Hudson
Robert Havell, Jr., View of the Hudson River from Tarrytown, c. 1866
The Erie Canal in Amsterdam, New York
The George Washington Bridge links Upper Manhattan and Fort Lee, New Jersey
The Hudson Valley Hot-Air Balloon Festival, 2009
US Airways Flight 1549 after landing on the waters of the Hudson River in January 2009
North River by George Bellows, 1908, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts
The Norrie Point Environmental Center in Staatsburg, headquarters of the Hudson River National Estuarine Research Reserve
Debris floating on the river near the World Trade Center, 1973
A juvenile house sparrow by the Hudson River

It originates in the Adirondack Mountains of Upstate New York and flows southward through the Hudson Valley to the Upper New York Bay between New York City and Jersey City, eventually draining into the Atlantic Ocean at New York Harbor.

Stretch of the Hudson River (in red) between New Jersey and Manhattan anachronistically referred to as the North River

North River (Hudson River)

Stretch of the Hudson River (in red) between New Jersey and Manhattan anachronistically referred to as the North River
The Hudson looking south from atop the Hudson Palisades, anachronistically referred to by some as the North River
Flight 1549 landed on the Hudson River in waters referred to by some as the North River.
Revolutionary-era map using both names
North River label of a stretch of the Hudson River between Hudson County, New Jersey, and Lower Manhattan on a 1997 Hagstrom Map of Manhattan
Chelsea Piers, with the Lusitania docked, circa 1910
Rebuilding of Pier 97 in Hudson River Park
Javits Center, behind which is located New York Waterway's Midtown Ferry Terminal at Pier 79. The Weehawken Yards were across the river at the base of the Hudson Palisades.
Railroad and ferry terminals along the North River circa 1900

North River is an alternative name for the southernmost portion of the Hudson River in the vicinity of New York City and northeastern New Jersey in the United States.

Arms of the Duke of York

Duke of York

Title of nobility in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.

Title of nobility in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.

Arms of the Duke of York

The fifth creation was in favour of James Stuart, the second son of Charles I. New York, its capital Albany, and New York City, were named for this particular Duke of Albany and York.

A sign for Juan Rodriguez Way in Inwood, Manhattan.

Juan (Jan) Rodriguez

One of the first documented non-indigenous inhabitants to live on Manhattan Island.

One of the first documented non-indigenous inhabitants to live on Manhattan Island.

A sign for Juan Rodriguez Way in Inwood, Manhattan.

As such, he is considered the first non-native resident of what would eventually become New York City.

Albany, New York

Capital of the U.S. state of New York, and the seat and largest city of Albany County.

Capital of the U.S. state of New York, and the seat and largest city of Albany County.

North Pearl Street from Maiden Lane North by James Eights, circa 1805
This 1895 map of Albany shows the gridded block system as it expanded around the former turnpikes.
The steamer Albany departs for New York City; at the height of steam travel in 1884, more than 1.5 million passengers took the trip.
The Albany Lumber District was home to the largest lumber market in the nation in 1865.
Broadway in Albany during the funeral ceremonies for Abraham Lincoln (1865)
The Albany Institute of History & Art
This 1955 map shows the planned expansion of the Interstate Highway System around Albany.
The Albany Pine Bush is the only sizable inland pine barrens sand dune ecosystem in the United States.
Housing in Ten Broeck Triangle, a subset of the Arbor Hill neighborhood
The 1929 Washington Park Lake House replaced a wooden lake house built in 1876.
Lincoln Park is flanked on the north by the Empire State Plaza.
The New York State Capitol
Aerial view of Albany looking northeast
System Administration Building of the State University of New York
This 1789 etching shows the Dutch influence on the architecture of early Albany.
Price Chopper sponsors the annual Fourth of July fireworks show at the Empire State Plaza (2009 show pictured).
An artist paints tulips during the Tulip Fest at Washington Park.
Ten Broeck Mansion is home to the Albany County Historical Association.
Southwest corner of the Cultural Education Center on Empire State Plaza housing the State Museum, Library, and Archives.
Albany High School is the central high school of the City School District of Albany.
State Quad is one of the four iconic dormitory towers at SUNY Albany's Uptown Campus.
One Commerce Plaza
SUNY Polytechnic Institute's College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering embodies Albany's emerging high-tech industry.
Albany City Hall, an 1883 Richardsonian Romanesque structure, is the seat of Albany's government.
The First Church in Albany (Reformed) is the oldest congregation in Upstate New York.
WTEN (headquarters pictured), WXXA, and Spectrum News broadcast from within city limits.
Albany-Rensselaer Amtrak Station
Albany International Airport
The Port of Albany-Rensselaer adds $428 million to the Capital District's $70.1 billion gross product.
Siena guard Ronald Moore dribbles toward the basket in a game against Loyola in January 2010.

Albany is on the west bank of the Hudson River, about 10 mi south of its confluence with the Mohawk River, and about 135 mi north of New York City.

A map of Upper Manhattan.

Upper Manhattan

A map of Upper Manhattan.
Grant's Tomb, an Upper Manhattan landmark and tourist attraction
City College of New York in Hamilton Heights
The Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park houses the medieval art collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art
The Little Red Lighthouse under the George Washington Bridge
Inwood Hill Park contains the last remnant of the primeval forest which once covered Manhattan; these caves were used by native Lenape people

Upper Manhattan is the most northern region of the New York City borough of Manhattan.

Greater Tokyo Area, Japan, the world's most populated urban area, with about 38 million inhabitants

Urban area

Human settlement with a high population density and infrastructure of built environment.

Human settlement with a high population density and infrastructure of built environment.

Greater Tokyo Area, Japan, the world's most populated urban area, with about 38 million inhabitants
Greater Melbourne, Australia at night, seen from the International Space Station
Urban land area (km2), 2010
Urban areas with at least one million inhabitants in 2006
India gate panorama.
A street sign indicating the beginning of an urban area in Finland. The picture was taken in Vimpeli.
São Paulo, the largest city in Brazil, the largest city proper in the Southern Hemisphere, in the Americas, and the world's ninth-largest urban area by population.
Moscow, the capital and largest city of Russia
Saint Petersburg, the cultural capital and the second-largest city
Yekaterinburg, the fourth-largest city in the country.

2) 🇺🇸 New York - Newark (United States) - 18,805,000

Daytime scene on Broadway Broadway.png Broadway through Manhattan, the Bronx and lower Westchester County is highlighted in red

Broadway (Manhattan)

Not to be confused with East Broadway or West Broadway, both also in Manhattan, or with Broadway theatre, commonly referred to as "Broadway".

Not to be confused with East Broadway or West Broadway, both also in Manhattan, or with Broadway theatre, commonly referred to as "Broadway".

Daytime scene on Broadway Broadway.png Broadway through Manhattan, the Bronx and lower Westchester County is highlighted in red
Broadway in 1834
Broadway in 1860
Somerindyke House, Bloomingdale Road, middle 19th century
Looking north from Broome Street (circa 1853–55)
In 1885, the Broadway commercial district was overrun with telephone, telegraph, and electrical lines. This view was north from Cortlandt and Maiden Lane.
The segment of Broadway in Times Square
A view up Broadway from Bowling Green, with the Chrysler Building visible in the background
A view of Broadway in 1909
Broadway looking north from 48th Street in the Theater District
X-shaped intersection of Broadway (from lower right to upper left) and Amsterdam Avenue (lower left to upper right), looking north from Sherman Square to West 72nd Street and the treetops of Verdi Square
Broadway at Dyckman Street in Inwood
North Broadway (U.S. 9) in Yonkers
The Washington Irving Memorial on North Broadway in Irvington, not far from Irving's home, Sunnyside
Canyon of Heroes during a ticker-tape parade for the Apollo 11 astronauts on August 13, 1969
Broadway under the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line's elevated structure in the Bronx
Plan of 1868 for an "arcade railway"
International Mercantile Marine Company Building

Broadway runs from State Street at Bowling Green for 13 mi through the borough of Manhattan and 2 mi through the Bronx, exiting north from New York City to run an additional 18 mi through the Westchester County municipalities of Yonkers, Hastings-On-Hudson, Dobbs Ferry, Irvington, and Tarrytown, and terminating north of Sleepy Hollow.