Union Square looking north from 14th Street (May 2010)
Union Park New York (East side), New York Public Library
Albert Gallatin (1761–1849) by Gilbert Stuart
George Washington Statue at Union Square
NYU Building in Washington Square, 1850
Union Square in 1908
The University Heights campus, now home to Bronx Community College
The renovated pavilion at the north end of the park in February 2011
Washington Square Park, with its gateway arch, is surrounded largely by NYU buildings and plays an integral role in the university's campus life.
W New York Union Square; the Everett Building can be seen at left
Bobst Library
Mohandas Gandhi
Bern Dibner Library of Science and Technology on the Brooklyn campus
The outdoor Greenmarket Farmers Market, held four days each week
NYU Langone Health
The former Kellogg's cafe at Union Square; the AT&T Wireless store is underneath it and next to the entrance
NYU Abu Dhabi
Spectators watch as a street chess player plays bullet chess with a customer in Union Square.
NYU Shanghai
{{center|Boy selling newspapers in Union Square, July 1910}}
Washington Square Village, home to NYU faculty and graduate students
{{center|The square in the blizzard of 2006}}
A bus system transports students to and from the far ends of campus.
{{center|14th Street–Union Square station entrance}}
Jack Dorsey, American billionaire and internet entrepreneur, founder and CEO of Twitter and Square, Inc.; CAS (dropped out)
{{center|Metronome by Kristin Jones/Andrew Ginzel (1999)}}
Robert Muller III, American public official; lead director of the Special Counsel investigation, author of the Mueller Report, former Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation; GSAS '67
{{center|Metronome revision by Andrew Boyd and Gan Golan (2020)}}
Alan Greenspan, American economist and public official; former long-time Chairman of the Federal Reserve; Stern '48, '50, '77
{{center|Union Square West (2011), including the Bank of the Metropolis Building and Decker Building, on the left (downtown) end of the block}}
Carol Bellamy, American politician; former executive director of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF); Law '68
{{center|Former Germania Life Insurance Company Building, now the W New York Union Square Hotel}}
Ma Ying-jeou, Taiwanese politician; Former President of the Republic of China; Law '76
{{center|Former Union Square Savings Bank, now the Daryl Roth Theatre}}
Jonas Salk, American biologist; creator of the polio vaccine; founder of the Salk Institute; Medicine '39
{{center|Zeckendorf Towers with the renovated north plaza of the park in the foreground, and the Con Ed Building in the background}}
Martin Scorsese, American filmmaker, director and actor; AFI Life Achievement Award winner, 20-time Academy Award winner, 23-time BAFTA winner, 11-time Golden Globes winner; CAS '64, Steinhardt '68
Spike Lee, American filmmaker, director and producer; two-time Academy Award winner; two-time Emmy Award winner; Tisch '83
Ang Lee OBS, Taiwanese film director; three-time Academy Award winner; two-time Golden Lion winner; Tisch '83
Alan Menken, American composer, songwriter, and record producer; one of only sixteen people to have won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy, and a Tony; Steinhart '71
Suzanne Collins, American television writer and author; Author of The New York Times best-selling series The Underland Chronicles and The Hunger Games trilogy; Tisch '89
Alec Baldwin, American actor, writer, comedian and philanthropist; three-time Emmy Award winner; three-time Golden Globe winner; Tisch '94
Lady Gaga, American singer, songwriter, and actress; nine-time Grammy Award winner; thirteen-time MTV Video Music Award winner; Tisch (dropped out)
Angelina Jolie, American actress and humanitarian; three-time Golden Globe Award winner; Special Envoy to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees; Tisch (non-degree seeking)
Mahershala Ali, American actor; two-time Academy Award winner; Golden Globe Award winner; three-time Screen Actors Guild Award winner; Tisch '00
Woody Allen, American director, actor and comedian; four-time Academy Award winner; nine-time BAFTA Award winner; Tisch (dropped out)
Adam Sandler, American actor, director and comedian; five-time MTV Movie & TV Award winner; eight-time People's Choice Award winner; Tisch '88
Donald Glover, American actor, comedian, screenwriter, and singer; two-time Golden Globe Award winner; five-time Grammy Award winner; Tisch '06
Anne Hathaway, American actress; Academy Award and Golden Globe Award winner; Gallatin (dropped out)
Tom Ford, American fashion designer and filmmaker; former creative director at Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent; CAS (dropped out)

Many buildings of The New School are near the square, as are several dormitories of New York University.

- Union Square, Manhattan

In the 1990s, NYU became a "two square" university by building a second community around Union Square, in close proximity to Washington Square.

- New York University

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Manhattan

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Most densely populated and geographically smallest of the five boroughs of New York City.

Most densely populated and geographically smallest of the five boroughs of New York City.

Peter Minuit, early 1600s
Pieter Schaghen's 1626 letter saying Manhattan was purchased for 60 guilders.
The Castello Plan showing the Dutch city of New Amsterdam in 1660, at the southern tip of Manhattan
Washington's statue in front of Federal Hall on Wall Street, where in 1789 he was sworn in as first U.S. president
Manhattan in 1873. The Brooklyn Bridge was under construction from 1870 until 1883
The "Sanitary & Topographical Map of the City and Island of New York", commonly known as the Viele Map, was created by Egbert Ludovicus Viele in 1865
Manhattan's Little Italy, Lower East Side, circa 1900
Manhattan personified, early 20th century
V-J Day in Times Square in Times Square, 1945
Flooding on Avenue C caused by Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012
Satellite image of Manhattan Island, bounded by the Hudson River to the west, the Harlem River to the north, the East River to the east, and New York Harbor to the south, with rectangular Central Park prominently visible. Roosevelt Island, in the East River, belongs to Manhattan.
Location of Manhattan (red) within New York City (remainder yellow)
Manhattan schist outcropping in Central Park
Liberty Island is an exclave of Manhattan, of New York City, and of New York State, that is surrounded by New Jersey waters
The Empire State Building in the foreground looking southward from the top of Rockefeller Center, with One World Trade Center in the background, at sunset. The Midtown South Community Council acts as a civic caretaker for much of the neighborhood between the skyscrapers of Midtown and Lower Manhattan.
Central Park in autumn
The Estonian House, the main center of Estonian culture amongst Estonian Americans
A. T. Stewart in 1870, 9th Street, Manhattan
Many tall buildings have setbacks on their facade due to the 1916 Zoning Resolution. This is exemplified at Park Avenue and 57th Street in Midtown Manhattan.
The New York Stock Exchange, by a significant margin the world's largest stock exchange per market capitalization of its listed companies, at US$23.1 trillion as of April 2018.
The Financial District of Lower Manhattan, seen from Brooklyn
The Flatiron District is the center and birthplace of Silicon Alley
Times Square is the hub of the Broadway theater district and a major cultural venue in Manhattan, it also has one of the highest annual attendance rates of any tourist attraction in the world, estimated at 50 million
The New York Times headquarters, 620 Eighth Avenue
Butler Library at Columbia University, with its notable architectural design
Stuyvesant High School, in Tribeca
New York Public Library Main Branch at 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
The scene at Manhattan's 2015 LGBT Pride March. The annual event rivals the sister São Paulo event as the world's largest pride parade, attracting tens of thousands of participants and millions of sidewalk spectators each June.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Madison Square Garden is home to the Rangers and Knicks, and hosts some Liberty games
The Skating Pond in Central Park, 1862
Manhattan Municipal Building
James Farley Post Office
A slum tour through the Five Points in an 1885 sketch
Tenement houses in 1936
At the time of its construction, London Terrace in Chelsea was the largest apartment building in the world
Grand Central Terminal is a National Historic Landmark.
Ferries departing Battery Park City and helicopters flying above Manhattan
The Staten Island Ferry, seen from the Battery, crosses Upper New York Bay, providing free public transportation between Staten Island and Manhattan.
The Brooklyn Bridge to the right and the Manhattan Bridge towards the left, are two of the three bridges that connect Lower Manhattan with Brooklyn over the East River.
Eighth Avenue, looking northward ("Uptown"), in the rain; most streets and avenues in Manhattan's grid plan incorporate a one-way traffic configuration
Tourists looking westward at sunset to observe the July 12, 2016 Manhattanhenge
Ferry service departing Battery Park City towards New Jersey, see from Paulus Hook

Numerous colleges and universities are located in Manhattan, including Columbia University, New York University, Cornell Tech, Weill Cornell Medical College, and Rockefeller University, which have been ranked among the top 40 in the world.

Union Square Park

Daytime scene on Broadway Broadway.png Broadway through Manhattan, the Bronx and lower Westchester County is highlighted in red

Broadway (Manhattan)

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Road in the U.S. state of New York.

Road in the U.S. state of New York.

Daytime scene on Broadway Broadway.png Broadway through Manhattan, the Bronx and lower Westchester County is highlighted in red
Broadway in 1834
Broadway in 1860
Somerindyke House, Bloomingdale Road, middle 19th century
Looking north from Broome Street (circa 1853–55)
In 1885, the Broadway commercial district was overrun with telephone, telegraph, and electrical lines. This view was north from Cortlandt and Maiden Lane.
The segment of Broadway in Times Square
A view up Broadway from Bowling Green, with the Chrysler Building visible in the background
A view of Broadway in 1909
Broadway looking north from 48th Street in the Theater District
X-shaped intersection of Broadway (from lower right to upper left) and Amsterdam Avenue (lower left to upper right), looking north from Sherman Square to West 72nd Street and the treetops of Verdi Square
Broadway at Dyckman Street in Inwood
North Broadway (U.S. 9) in Yonkers
The Washington Irving Memorial on North Broadway in Irvington, not far from Irving's home, Sunnyside
Canyon of Heroes during a ticker-tape parade for the Apollo 11 astronauts on August 13, 1969
Broadway under the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line's elevated structure in the Bronx
Plan of 1868 for an "arcade railway"
International Mercantile Marine Company Building

Another change was made on November 10, 1963, when Broadway became one-way southbound from Herald Square to Madison Square (23rd Street) and Union Square (14th Street) to Canal Street, and two routes – Sixth Avenue south of Herald Square and Centre Street, Lafayette Street, and Fourth Avenue south of Union Square – became one-way northbound.

It is a short walk from there to New York University near Washington Square Park, which is at the foot of Fifth Avenue.

Greenwich Village

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Neighborhood on the west side of Lower Manhattan in New York City, bounded by 14th Street to the north, Broadway to the east, Houston Street to the south, and the Hudson River to the west.

Neighborhood on the west side of Lower Manhattan in New York City, bounded by 14th Street to the north, Broadway to the east, Houston Street to the south, and the Hudson River to the west.

MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village
453–461 Sixth Avenue in the Historic District
The intersection of West 4th and West 12th Streets
Street signs at intersection of West 10th and West 4th Streets
Map of old Greenwich Village. A section of Bernard Ratzer's map of New York and its suburbs, made ca. 1766 for Henry Moore, royal governor of New York, when Greenwich was more than 2 miles (3 km) from the city.
Gay Street at the corner of Waverly Place; the street's name refers to a colonial family, not the LGBT character of Greenwich Village
Whitney Museum of American Art's original location, at 8–12 West 8th Street, between Fifth Avenue and MacDougal Street; currently home to the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture.
The Cherry Lane Theatre is located in Greenwich Village.
The annual Greenwich Village Halloween Parade is the world's largest Halloween parade.
The Stonewall Inn, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement.
Blue Note Jazz Club
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of Greenwich Village and nearby New York University
396-397 West Street at West 10th Street is a former hotel which dates from 1904, and is part of the Weehawken Street Historic District
Washington Mews in Greenwich Village; an NYU building can be seen in the background
Christopher Park, part of the Stonewall National Monument
NYPD 6th Precinct
West Village Post Office
Jefferson Market Library, once a courthouse, now serves as a branch of the New York Public Library.
Robert De Niro
Robert Downey Jr.
Hank Greenberg
Emma Stone
90 Bedford Street, used for establishing shot in Friends

Greenwich Village contains Washington Square Park, as well as two of New York City's private colleges, New York University (NYU) and The New School.

Adjacent to Greenwich Village are the neighborhoods of NoHo and the East Village to the east, SoHo and Hudson Square to the south, and Chelsea and Union Square to the north.

University Place (Manhattan)

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[[File:Dr. Hutton's Church, University Place, from Robert N. Dennis collection of stereoscopic views crop.jpg|thumb|237px|"Dr. Hutton's Church on University Place" (c. 1856–1879).

[[File:Dr. Hutton's Church, University Place, from Robert N. Dennis collection of stereoscopic views crop.jpg|thumb|237px|"Dr. Hutton's Church on University Place" (c. 1856–1879).

University Place is a short north-south thoroughfare in Manhattan, New York City, United States, which runs from Washington Square Park in the south as a continuation of Washington Square East, taking the position of Madison Avenue uptown, and terminates at East 14th Street just southwest of Union Square.

University Place was formerly part of Wooster Street, but received a new name in 1838, a year after New York University's first building opened on Washington Square.