New York Yankees

Hilltop Park, home of the Highlanders
The Polo Grounds, home of the Yankees from 1913 to 1922, was demolished in 1964, after the Mets had moved to Shea Stadium in Flushing.
With his hitting prowess, Babe Ruth ushered in an offensive-oriented era of baseball and helped lead the Yankees to four World Series titles.
Lou Gehrig
In 1941, Joe DiMaggio set an MLB record with a 56-game hitting streak that stands to this day and will probably never be broken.
Opening Day of the 1951 baseball season at Griffith Stadium. President Harry Truman throws out the first ball as Bucky Harris and Casey Stengel look on.
Mickey Mantle was one of the franchise's most celebrated hitters, highlighted by his 1956 Triple Crown and World Series championship.
During 1974 and 1975, Yankee Stadium was renovated into its final shape and structure, as shown here in 2002, seven years before demolition.
The mask and catcher's mitt of Thurman Munson, the team captain who was killed in a plane crash in 1979
Don Mattingly headlined a Yankees franchise that struggled in the 1980s.
The Yankees' success in the late 1990s and early 2000s was built from a core of productive players that included Jorge Posada, Mariano Rivera, and Derek Jeter.
Yankees' third baseman Alex Rodriguez, 2007
Joe Girardi was a Yankees catcher before he became manager in 2008.
The new Yankee Stadium opened in 2009 and was christened with a World Series victory in the same way that the original Yankee Stadium was christened with a World Series victory when it opened in 1923.
Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge quickly became the new face of the team.
World Series rings
"Freddy Sez" holding one of his signs near the bleachers entrance before a game between the Yankees and the Texas Rangers
A shirt worn by a number of Bleacher Creatures
The grounds crew at Yankee Stadium dancing to "Y.M.C.A."
Announcers Michael Kay, Paul O'Neill, Ken Singleton, and Ryan Ruocco in the YES Network broadcast booth at Yankee Stadium in 2009
The first four in the row of retired numbers at the old Yankee Stadium
Yogi Berra
Joe DiMaggio
Whitey Ford
Derek Jeter
Reggie Jackson
Mickey Mantle
Babe Ruth
Mariano Rivera
Lou Gehrig

American professional baseball team based in the New York City borough of the Bronx.

- New York Yankees

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Boone in 2018

Aaron Boone

Boone in 2018
Boone with the Marlins in 2007
Boone in June 2018

Aaron John Boone (born March 9, 1973) is an American baseball manager and former infielder who is the manager of the New York Yankees in Major League Baseball (MLB).

Yankee Stadium in 2011

Yankee Stadium

Ballpark located in the Bronx, New York City.

Ballpark located in the Bronx, New York City.

Yankee Stadium in 2011
The iconic frieze that lined the roof of the original Yankee Stadium from 1923 to 1973 is replicated on the current stadium's roof
The Great Hall is situated along the southern front of the stadium
The view from the Grandstand Level (400 Level) August 12, 2009
The stadium, as seen from the upper deck in 2010
Yankee Stadium with the tarp on the field, before a game, in what became a rain delay
Yankee Stadium in 2012, from the left field upper deck
Four F-16C Fighting Falcons from the 174th Fighter Wing fly over the "New" Yankee Stadium on Opening Day
Yankee Stadium hosting a New York City FC soccer match in 2015.
Yankee Stadium in football configuration for a game between Army and Rutgers

It is the home field for Major League Baseball's New York Yankees and Major League Soccer's New York City FC.

Baltimore Orioles

American professional baseball team based in Baltimore.

American professional baseball team based in Baltimore.

The "Oriole Bird", which has been the official mascot figure since April 6, 1979.
Frank Robinson statue by Antonio Tobias Mendez.
The Orioles hosting one of the final games at Memorial Stadium in 1991.
The numbers on the Orioles' warehouse changed from 2130 to 2131 to celebrate Cal Ripken Jr. passing Lou Gehrig's consecutive games played streak.
The Orioles celebrate a 6–5 victory over the Mariners at Camden Yards on May 13, 2010.
Adam Jones in 2017
Oriole Park at Camden Yards
The 2012 uniforms. Left to right: home, away, Saturday (away with gray pants), Friday (away with gray pants).
Paul Blair shown with the full-bodied bird logo between 1954–1965
Earl Weaver with the 1970 World Series trophy
Eddie Murray
Jim Palmer
Cal Ripken Jr.
Earl Weaver

The Orioles adopted their team name in honor of the official state bird of Maryland; it had been used previously by several baseball clubs in the city, including another AL charter member franchise also named the "Baltimore Orioles", which moved north to New York in 1903 to eventually become the Yankees.

Gehrig with the New York Yankees in 1923

Lou Gehrig

Gehrig with the New York Yankees in 1923
Gehrig on the Columbia University baseball team
Gehrig during his rookie year, 1923
Gehrig and Detroit slugger Hank Greenberg in 1935
Gehrig, Tris Speaker, Ty Cobb, and Babe Ruth, 1928
Seven of the American League's 1937 All-Star players, from left to right Gehrig, Joe Cronin, Bill Dickey, Joe DiMaggio, Charlie Gehringer, Jimmie Foxx, and Hank Greenberg: All seven were eventually elected to the Hall of Fame.
The Yankee dynamic duo reunited – Gehrig and Babe Ruth at Yankee Stadium on July 4, 1939, shortly after Gehrig's retirement. Within a decade, a similar testimonial would honor Ruth, who died from cancer in 1948.
Gehrig's funeral at Christ Episcopal Church in Riverdale, Bronx, June 4, 1941
Lou and Eleanor Gehrig's headstone in Kensico Cemetery (the year of his birth was erroneously inscribed as "1905")
Lou Gehrig Way in New Rochelle, New York: He lived in a modest home at 9 Meadow Lane in the Residents Park section near the College of New Rochelle.
Gehrig 1933 Goudey baseball card
Gehrig sliding into home plate in 1925
Gehrig in the 1938 feature film Rawhide

Henry Louis Gehrig (born Heinrich Ludwig Gehrig; June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941) was an American professional baseball first baseman who played 17 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees (1923–1939).

Ruth in 1920

Babe Ruth

American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935.

American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935.

Ruth in 1920
Ruth's birthplace in Baltimore, Maryland, is now a museum.
George Herman Ruth Sr. family in the 1900 US Census
Baseball card showing Ruth as a Baltimore Oriole, 1914
Ruth pitching for the Boston Red Sox
Providence Grays with Babe Ruth (top row, center), 1914
Ruth during batting practice in 1916.
Ruth in 1918, his penultimate year with the Red Sox
Ruth in 1919
Ruth in his first year with the New York Yankees, 1920
"How Does He Do It?" In this Clifford Berryman cartoon, presidential candidates Warren G. Harding and James M. Cox wonder at Ruth's record home run pace.
Ruth and Shoeless Joe Jackson looking at one of Babe's home run bats, 1920
Ruth in the stands on Opening Day, April 12, 1922, at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C.
Ruth after losing consciousness from running into the wall at Griffith Stadium during a game against the Washington Senators on July 5, 1924. Ruth insisted on staying in the game, despite evident pain and a bruised pelvic bone, and hit a double in his next at-bat. Note the absence of a warning track along the outfield wall.
Ruth took time off in 1927 to star with Anna Q. Nilsson in this First National silent production Babe Comes Home. This film is now lost.
Lou Gehrig, Tris Speaker, Ty Cobb, and Ruth, 1928
1933 Goudey Sport Kings baseball card
Gary Cooper and Ruth in the 1942 film The Pride of the Yankees
Ruth and his first wife, Helen Woodford, 1915
The Pulitzer Prize-winning photo of Ruth by Nat Fein
Tribute to Babe Ruth, Monument Park, as seen at the original Yankee Stadium
The unveiling of a Babe Ruth memorial plaque in Baltimore's old Memorial Stadium in 1955 with Claire Ruth, his widow, present.
Ruth memorabilia at the Baseball Hall of Fame (2014)

Nicknamed "the Bambino" and "the Sultan of Swat", he began his MLB career as a star left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, but achieved his greatest fame as a slugging outfielder for the New York Yankees.

DiMaggio with the New York Yankees in 1951

Joe DiMaggio

DiMaggio with the New York Yankees in 1951
A baseball card of DiMaggio with the San Francisco Seals, c. 1933–36
Seven of the American League's 1937 All-Star players: Lou Gehrig, Joe Cronin, Bill Dickey, Joe DiMaggio, Charlie Gehringer, Jimmie Foxx, and Hank Greenberg. All seven were inducted into the Hall of Fame.
1941 Advertisement featuring DiMaggio
DiMaggio in 1951, his last year in baseball
DiMaggio and Mickey Mantle at Yankee Stadium in 1970, two years after Mantle's retirement
DiMaggio kisses his bat in 1941, the year he hit safely in 56 consecutive games. His wife Dorothy Arnold was pregnant with their son Joe Jr. while the streak was in progress.
Monroe and DiMaggio when they were married in January 1954
The iconic image of Marilyn Monroe in a white dress from The Seven Year Itch (1955). Here Monroe poses for photographers in September 1954 during filming, which angered DiMaggio.
DiMaggio and Marilyn Monroe staying at Imperial Hotel in Tokyo on their honeymoon
DiMaggio's grave at Holy Cross Cemetery in Colma, California
DiMaggio's plaque at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum
President Ronald Reagan and DiMaggio at the White House, March 27, 1981, three days before the attempted assassination of Reagan
DiMaggio with President George H. W. Bush in 1991
DiMaggio in 1950

Joseph Paul DiMaggio (November 25, 1914 – March 8, 1999), nicknamed "Joltin' Joe", "The Yankee Clipper" and "Joe D.", was an American baseball center fielder who played his entire 13-year career in Major League Baseball for the New York Yankees.

Mantle in 1957

Mickey Mantle

American professional baseball player.

American professional baseball player.

Mantle in 1957
Mantle as a 19-year-old rookie in 1951
Mantle on the cover of Time (June 15, 1953)
Bowman's Mantle trading card, 1954
Mantle signing an autograph in the early 1960s
Roger Maris and Mantle during the historic 1961 season, when they both chased Babe Ruth's home run record
Mantle at an autograph show 20 years after his retirement, 1988
Autograph signature of Mickey Mantle
Joe DiMaggio and Mantle at Yankee Stadium in 1970, two years after Mantle's retirement
Mantle's monument in Yankee Stadium's Monument Park, Bronx, New York
Mantle's plaque at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York

Mantle played his entire Major League Baseball (MLB) career (1951–1968) with the New York Yankees as a center fielder, right fielder, and first baseman.

A partial view of the Green Monster at Fenway Park, with the final standings of the AL East at the conclusion of the season

American League East

One of six divisions in Major League Baseball (MLB).

One of six divisions in Major League Baseball (MLB).

A partial view of the Green Monster at Fenway Park, with the final standings of the AL East at the conclusion of the season
The New York Yankees celebrating their 2009 World Series championship

New York Yankees (1969–present), founding member

Ford in 1953

Whitey Ford

Ford in 1953
Ford shooting a rifle in training for the military
Ford in 1954
Ford's plaque at Monument Park in Yankee Stadium
Ford in 2010

Edward Charles "Whitey" Ford (October 21, 1928 – October 8, 2020), nicknamed "the Chairman of the Board", was an American professional baseball pitcher who played his entire 16-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career with the New York Yankees.

Berra with the New York Yankees in 1953

Yogi Berra

American professional baseball catcher who later took on the roles of manager and coach.

American professional baseball catcher who later took on the roles of manager and coach.

Berra with the New York Yankees in 1953
Berra with the New York Yankees in 1953
Berra with Hank Bauer and Mickey Mantle, 1953
Berra as the Mets' first base coach, 1969
Berra hitting with a fungo bat prior to a game in 1981
Berra in 2000
Sparky Anderson, George W. Bush, and Yogi Berra in the East Room of the White House, 2001
Berra in 2007

He played 19 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) (1946–1963, 1965), all but the last for the New York Yankees.