New York accent

Brooklyn accentBronx accentNew York CityBrooklynBrooklyn pronunciationNew YorkNew York accentsNew York City Accent
The sound system of New York City English is popularly known as a New York accent.wikipedia
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New York City English

New York accentNew York CityNew York English
The sound system of New York City English is popularly known as a New York accent.
The dialect is widely known for its pronunciation system, the New York accent, which comprises a number of both conservative and innovative features.

Boston accent

BostonBoston EnglishEastern Massachusetts accent
Boston and surrounding northeastern New England form the only major region in North America where the distinction between the vowel phonemes "broad a" (as in father) and "short o" (as in bother) is often maintained (with some New York accents also following this pattern).

New Orleans English

YatYat dialectNew Orleans
The accent is strongest among white members of the middle and lower class in New York City proper, western Long Island, and northeastern New Jersey, though it may be spoken to various extents by all classes in the New York City metropolitan area, and some of its features have diffused to many other areas; for example, the accent spoken by natives of New Orleans, Louisiana, locally known as Yat, is strikingly similar to the New York accent.
However, recent dialect studies suggest that New Orleans and New York City in particular have a shared dialect history, probably via New York accent features being transported to New Orleans thanks to significant nineteenth-century commercial interaction between the two cities.

Philadelphia English

PhiladelphiaPhiladelphia accentPhiladelphia dialect
The Philadelphia and New York accents presumably descended from a common ancestor dialect in the nineteenth century, since both accents in the twentieth century uniquely demonstrated a high vowel (creating a contrast between words like cot and caught) as well as a phonemic split of the short a vowel, (making gas and gap, for example, have different vowels sounds).

/æ/ raising

/æ/ tensingshort-''a'' splitæ-tensing
In the traditional New York accent, the tense is traditionally an entirely separate phoneme from as a result of a phonemic split.

New York Latino English

accents of LatinosEast Coast Latino English
Many Latino New Yorkers speak a distinctly local ethnolect, New York Latino English, characterized by a varying mix of New York City English and AAVE features, along with some Spanish contact features.

Alveolar ridge

alveolar marginAlveolaralveolar edge
There are exceptions to this however, such as speakers of the New York accent who pronounce [t] and [d] at the back of their top teeth (dental stops).

Brooklyn

Brooklyn, New YorkBrooklyn, NYKings
Despite common references to a "Bronx accent", "Brooklyn accent", "Long Island accent", etc. no published study has found any feature that varies internally within the dialect due to any specific geographic differences.
The Brooklyn accent has often been portrayed as the "typical New York accent" in American media, although this accent and stereotype are supposedly fading out.

African-American Vernacular English

African American Vernacular EnglishAAVEEbonics
Many Latino New Yorkers speak a distinctly local ethnolect, New York Latino English, characterized by a varying mix of New York City English and AAVE features, along with some Spanish contact features. Black New Yorkers typically speak African-American Vernacular English (AAVE), though sharing the New York accent's raised vowel.
The AAVE accent, New York accent, and Spanish-language accents have together yielded the sound of New York Latino English, some of whose speakers use an accent indistinguishable from an AAVE one.

Phonology

phonologicalphonologicallyphonologist
The sound system of New York City English is popularly known as a New York accent.

Accent (sociolinguistics)

accentaccentsregional accent
The New York metropolitan accent is one of the most recognizable accents of the United States, largely due to its popular stereotypes and portrayal in radio, film, and television.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
The New York metropolitan accent is one of the most recognizable accents of the United States, largely due to its popular stereotypes and portrayal in radio, film, and television.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
The accent is strongest among white members of the middle and lower class in New York City proper, western Long Island, and northeastern New Jersey, though it may be spoken to various extents by all classes in the New York City metropolitan area, and some of its features have diffused to many other areas; for example, the accent spoken by natives of New Orleans, Louisiana, locally known as Yat, is strikingly similar to the New York accent.

Long Island

Long Island, New YorkLong Island, NYEastern Long Island
The accent is strongest among white members of the middle and lower class in New York City proper, western Long Island, and northeastern New Jersey, though it may be spoken to various extents by all classes in the New York City metropolitan area, and some of its features have diffused to many other areas; for example, the accent spoken by natives of New Orleans, Louisiana, locally known as Yat, is strikingly similar to the New York accent. Despite common references to a "Bronx accent", "Brooklyn accent", "Long Island accent", etc. no published study has found any feature that varies internally within the dialect due to any specific geographic differences.

North Jersey

Northern New JerseyNorthernNorth
The accent is strongest among white members of the middle and lower class in New York City proper, western Long Island, and northeastern New Jersey, though it may be spoken to various extents by all classes in the New York City metropolitan area, and some of its features have diffused to many other areas; for example, the accent spoken by natives of New Orleans, Louisiana, locally known as Yat, is strikingly similar to the New York accent.

New York metropolitan area

New York City metropolitan areaCombined Statistical AreaNew York
The accent is strongest among white members of the middle and lower class in New York City proper, western Long Island, and northeastern New Jersey, though it may be spoken to various extents by all classes in the New York City metropolitan area, and some of its features have diffused to many other areas; for example, the accent spoken by natives of New Orleans, Louisiana, locally known as Yat, is strikingly similar to the New York accent. The New York metropolitan accent is one of the most recognizable accents of the United States, largely due to its popular stereotypes and portrayal in radio, film, and television.

New Orleans

New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans, LAOrleans Parish
The accent is strongest among white members of the middle and lower class in New York City proper, western Long Island, and northeastern New Jersey, though it may be spoken to various extents by all classes in the New York City metropolitan area, and some of its features have diffused to many other areas; for example, the accent spoken by natives of New Orleans, Louisiana, locally known as Yat, is strikingly similar to the New York accent.

New York (state)

New YorkNew York StateNY
The New York accent is not spoken in the rest of New York State beyond the metropolitan area; Upstate New York speakers instead generally fall under the Hudson Valley and Inland North dialects.

Western New England English

Western New EnglandHudson ValleyUpstate New York accent
The New York accent is not spoken in the rest of New York State beyond the metropolitan area; Upstate New York speakers instead generally fall under the Hudson Valley and Inland North dialects.

Inland Northern American English

Inland NorthInland North dialectNorthern Cities Shift
The New York accent is not spoken in the rest of New York State beyond the metropolitan area; Upstate New York speakers instead generally fall under the Hudson Valley and Inland North dialects.

R-colored vowel

rhotacizedrhotic vowelr-colored

Diaphoneme

diaphonemicLinguistic variablediaphonic