New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation

NZBCBCNZBroadcasting Corporation of New ZealandNew Zealand BroadcastingN.Z.B.C.NZBC Television
The New Zealand government established the New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation (NZBC) in 1962.wikipedia
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Radio New Zealand

RNZNew Zealand Broadcasting ServiceRadio NZ
The corporation was dissolved on 1 April 1975, and replaced by three separate organisations: Radio New Zealand, Television One, and Television Two, later known as South Pacific Television.
Government-funded public service radio in New Zealand was historically provided by the Radio Broadcasting Company between 1925 and 1931, the New Zealand Broadcasting Board between 1931 and 1936, the National Broadcasting Service between 1936 and 1962, the New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation between 1962 and 1975, and the Radio New Zealand state-owned enterprise between 1975 and 1995.

South Pacific Television

The corporation was dissolved on 1 April 1975, and replaced by three separate organisations: Radio New Zealand, Television One, and Television Two, later known as South Pacific Television.
It was the second national government television channel to be established in the country that year, after Television One went to air on 1 April, replacing the former New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation's TV service.

TVNZ 1

TV OneTV1Television One
The corporation was dissolved on 1 April 1975, and replaced by three separate organisations: Radio New Zealand, Television One, and Television Two, later known as South Pacific Television.
Owned and operated by the New Zealand Broadcasting Service (NZBS, which became the New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation in 1962), it initially broadcast for two hours a day, two days a week.

1 News

One NewsTonightOne Network News
The link was completed later that year, the first NZBC Network News transmitted on 3 November, read by Dougal Stevenson.
This bulletin was possible due to microwave links being established between the four main centres; the programme was called NZBC Network News.

TVNZ

Television New ZealandTV2TV New Zealand
The television channels would merge again in 1980 to become Television New Zealand, while Radio New Zealand remained unchanged.
TVNZ's predecessor, NZBC started as distinct stations in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin.

1974 British Commonwealth Games

1974 Commonwealth Games19741974 Christchurch
Colour television, using the Phase alternating line (PAL) system, was introduced on 31 October 1973, in preparation for the 1974 British Commonwealth Games, held in Christchurch the following February.
However, due to the NZBC's limited colour facilities, only athletics, swimming, and boxing could be broadcast in colour.

TVNZ 2

TV2TV 2Channel 2
The corporation was dissolved on 1 April 1975, and replaced by three separate organisations: Radio New Zealand, Television One, and Television Two, later known as South Pacific Television.
TV2 was formed following the dissolution of the New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation on 1 April 1975, with the corporation splitting into Radio New Zealand and two television channels: Television One and Television Two.

DNTV2

Dunedin studiosTVNZ in DunedinTVNZ's Dunedin Studio
DNTV2 was a television station in Dunedin, New Zealand established by the then New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation in 1962.

Television in New Zealand

New Zealand televisionNew Zealandtelevision
*Television in New Zealand
National won the 1960 election, and the new Minister of Broadcasting, Arthur Kinsella in the new National government rewrote the Broadcasting Act of 1936, and set up the state-owned New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation (NZBC) in 1962 to control public radio and television (although the party had been polarised between having a state-owned, private enterprise or mixed system).

Government of New Zealand

New Zealand GovernmentgovernmentNew Zealand
The New Zealand government established the New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation (NZBC) in 1962.

Auckland

Auckland, New ZealandAuckland New ZealandAuckland, NZ
At 7:30pm on 1 June 1960, New Zealand's first television channel, AKTV2, started broadcasting in Auckland from the NZBC building at 74 Shortland Street, previously used to broadcast public radio station 1YA and now home to The University of Auckland's Gus Fisher Gallery.

University of Auckland

Auckland UniversityAuckland University CollegeThe University of Auckland
At 7:30pm on 1 June 1960, New Zealand's first television channel, AKTV2, started broadcasting in Auckland from the NZBC building at 74 Shortland Street, previously used to broadcast public radio station 1YA and now home to The University of Auckland's Gus Fisher Gallery.

Gus Fisher Gallery

74 Shortland StreetThe University of Auckland Art Collection
At 7:30pm on 1 June 1960, New Zealand's first television channel, AKTV2, started broadcasting in Auckland from the NZBC building at 74 Shortland Street, previously used to broadcast public radio station 1YA and now home to The University of Auckland's Gus Fisher Gallery.

New Zealand House of Representatives

House of RepresentativesParliamentMP
During the course of the Bill through the House of Representatives in the session of 1961, provision was made for the establishment of privately owned stations and, although strongly opposed by the Labour Opposition, this became part of the Act.

New Zealand pound

NZ£pound£
The annual income from all sources exceeded NZ£5,000,000, more than NZ£250,000 being paid in taxation.

Chorus Limited

Chorus ChorusChorus Ltd
However, for urgent news video, it was possible to link the two stations in each island using Post Office Telephone Department (now Chorus) coaxial toll lines at the expense of a number of voice channels.

Wellington Harbour

Port NicholsonWellingtonWellington Waterfront
The most notable example of the unlinked facilities was when the inter-island ferry sank in Wellington Harbour on 10 April 1968 – newscasts of the disaster had to be transmitted over Post Office lines by WNTV1 to AKTV2 in Auckland.

Blenheim, New Zealand

BlenheimSeymour SquareBlenheim Borough
However, due to the storm disrupting both shipping and flights for a further 24 hours, the first video of the sinking crossed Cook Strait via regular transmissions from WNTV1 and was received on a privately owned television set in Blenheim, at the top of the South Island some 80 km line-of-sight distance from Wellington.

Apollo 11

1969 moon landingmoon landingfirst moon landing
By the time of the Apollo 11 mission in July 1969, the two islands were each network-capable via microwave link, but the link over Cook Strait had not been completed, and there was no link between New Zealand and the outside world.

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

ABCAustralian Broadcasting CommissionABC TV
Footage of the moon landing was recorded on video tape at the Australian Broadcasting Commission's ABN-2 in Sydney, then rushed by an RNZAF English Electric Canberra to Wellington and WNTV1.

ABN (TV station)

ABN-2ABNABC
Footage of the moon landing was recorded on video tape at the Australian Broadcasting Commission's ABN-2 in Sydney, then rushed by an RNZAF English Electric Canberra to Wellington and WNTV1.

Royal New Zealand Air Force

RNZAFNew Zealand Permanent Air ForceAir Force
Footage of the moon landing was recorded on video tape at the Australian Broadcasting Commission's ABN-2 in Sydney, then rushed by an RNZAF English Electric Canberra to Wellington and WNTV1.

English Electric Canberra

CanberraCanberrasCanberra bomber
Footage of the moon landing was recorded on video tape at the Australian Broadcasting Commission's ABN-2 in Sydney, then rushed by an RNZAF English Electric Canberra to Wellington and WNTV1.

Outside broadcasting

outside broadcastOB vanoutside broadcasts
To forward this to the South Island, the NZBC positioned one of its first outside broadcasting vans to beam the footage to a receiving dish across Cook Strait, from which it was forwarded through the recently commissioned South Island network.

Te Aroha

Mount Te Aroha
For instance, the Te Aroha regional transmitter for Hamilton could be switched away from Auckland programming to relay off-air, the Wellington signal coming up the country.