New Zealand First

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New Zealand First (Aotearoa Tuatahi), commonly abbreviated to NZ First, is a nationalist and populist political party in New Zealand.wikipedia
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Winston Peters

Rt Hon Winston PetersPeters, Winston Winston Peters
It was founded in July 1993, following the resignation on 19 March 1993 of its leader and founder, Winston Peters, from the then-governing National Party. In June 1992, National Party Member of Parliament for Tauranga, Winston Peters, was told that he would not be allowed to run under National's banner in the 1993 election.
Peters has led the populist New Zealand First party since its foundation in 1993.

List of political parties in New Zealand

political party in New ZealandPolitical parties in New Zealandpolitical parties
New Zealand First (Aotearoa Tuatahi), commonly abbreviated to NZ First, is a nationalist and populist political party in New Zealand.

New Zealand National Party

National PartyNationalThe National Party
It was founded in July 1993, following the resignation on 19 March 1993 of its leader and founder, Winston Peters, from the then-governing National Party.
Following the first MMP election in 1996, the National Party governed in a coalition with the populist New Zealand First.

2011 New Zealand general election

2011 general election2011 election2011
However, in the 2011 election, New Zealand First gained 6.59% of the total party vote, entitling it to eight members of parliament (MPs).
New Zealand First, having won no seats in 2008 due to its failure to either reach the 5% threshold or win an electorate, made a comeback with 6.6% of the vote entitling them to eight seats.

Sixth Labour Government of New Zealand

Labour-led coalition governmentSixth Labour Governmentcoalition government
In the weeks following the 2017 election, New Zealand First formed a coalition government with the Labour Party.
Following the 2017 general election held on 23 September 2017, the New Zealand First party held the balance of power between the sitting centre-right National Party government, and the left bloc of the Labour and Green parties.

2014 New Zealand general election

2014 general election20142014 election
The party increased its number of MPs to eleven at the 2014 election.
New Zealand First meanwhile increased its vote share to 8.7% and seat count to 11.

2017 New Zealand general election

2017 general election2017 election2017
During the 2017 election, the party's number of MPs dropped to nine members. Following the 2017 general election, Peters indicated that he would be willing to consider dropping his call for a referendum on abolishing the Māori seats during coalition-forming negotiations with Labour leader Jacinda Ardern.
The main opposition parties to the National government were Labour (the official opposition), led by Jacinda Ardern, the Green Party, and New Zealand First.

Referendums in New Zealand

referendumCitizens Initiated Referendumcitizens initiated referendums
The party distinguishes itself from the mainstream political establishment through its use of populist rhetoric, and supports popular referenda.
In 2003 the Fifth Labour Government replaced the Privy Council as New Zealand's highest court of appeal with a new Supreme Court, despite calls from New Zealand First, National and ACT for a referendum to be held on the issue.

Peter Brown (New Zealand politician)

Peter BrownBrown, Peter
In April 2008, deputy leader Peter Brown drew widespread attention after voicing similar views and expressing concern at the growth of New Zealand's ethnic Asian population: "If we continue this open door policy there is real danger we will be inundated with people who have no intention of integrating into our society … They will form their own mini-societies to the detriment of integration and that will lead to division, friction and resentment".
Peter Brown (born 18 October 1939) is a former deputy leader of the New Zealand First party.

New Zealand House of Representatives

House of RepresentativesParliamentMP
The party held seats in the New Zealand House of Representatives from its formation in 1993 until 2008, when it failed to gain enough party votes to retain representation.
The current government is a minority coalition government consisting of the Labour Party and New Zealand First, with confidence and supply provided by the Green Party.

2008 New Zealand general election

2008 general election2008 election2008
It did not stand candidates in the Māori electorates in the 2002, 2005, or 2008 general elections.
The New Zealand First party, which had seven MPs in the previous parliament, failed to win any electorates or pass the 5 per cent MMP threshold, and therefore won no seats in the new parliament.

2002 New Zealand general election

2002 election20022002 general election
It did not stand candidates in the Māori electorates in the 2002, 2005, or 2008 general elections.
Opposing Labour were the National Party (centre-right), United Future (centrist), New Zealand First (populist), ACT New Zealand (free-market).

2005 New Zealand general election

2005 election20052005 general election
It did not stand candidates in the Māori electorates in the 2002, 2005, or 2008 general elections.
On 17 October, Clark announced a new coalition agreement that saw the return of her minority government coalition with the Progressive Party, with confidence and supply support from New Zealand First and from United Future.

Marriage (Definition of Marriage) Amendment Act 2013

Marriage (Definition of Marriage) Amendment BillMarriage Amendment Billallow same-sex couples to marry
In 2013, all seven NZ First MPs voted against the third reading of the Marriage Amendment Bill, which permitted same sex marriage in New Zealand.
New Zealand First announced it would abstain, and that the legalisation of same-sex marriage should be put to a referendum.

Tight Five

Winston Peters is part-Māori; the party once held all Māori electorates (see Tight Five), and it continues to receive significant support from voters registered in Māori electorates.
The Tight Five was a nickname given to the five Māori MPs elected to the New Zealand Parliament in 1996 from the centrist/populist New Zealand First party.

Fourth National Government of New Zealand

Fourth National GovernmentNational governmentFourth National
At the time of its formation, New Zealand First's policy platform was broadly conservative—Peters claimed to be reviving National policies from which the Bolger government had departed.
Following electoral reforms in the 1996 election, Jim Bolger formed a coalition with New Zealand First.

Tau Henare

Henare, TauTau Henare, Jr.
Peters easily retained Tauranga, and Tau Henare, another New Zealand First candidate, won the Northern Māori seat, giving the party a total of two MPs.
In representing three different political parties in parliament—New Zealand First, Mauri Pacific and the National Party—Henare served as a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1993 to 1999 and from 2005 to 2014.

Jacinda Ardern

ArdernJacinda ArdenRt Hon Jacinda Ardern
Following the 2017 general election, Peters indicated that he would be willing to consider dropping his call for a referendum on abolishing the Māori seats during coalition-forming negotiations with Labour leader Jacinda Ardern.
After negotiations with National and Labour, the New Zealand First party chose to enter into a minority coalition government with Labour, supported by the Greens, with Ardern as Prime Minister.

1996 New Zealand general election

1996 election19961996 general election
With the switch to the mixed-member proportional (MMP) electoral system for the 1996 election, smaller parties could gain a share of seats proportional to their share of the vote.
It saw the National Party, led by Jim Bolger, retain its position in government, but only after protracted negotiations with the smaller New Zealand First party to form a coalition.

1993 New Zealand general election

1993 election19931993 general election
In June 1992, National Party Member of Parliament for Tauranga, Winston Peters, was told that he would not be allowed to run under National's banner in the 1993 election.
The new Alliance and New Zealand First parties gained significant shares of the vote, but won few seats.

Helen Clark

ClarkClark, HelenHelen Elizabeth Clark
Winston Peters negotiated with then-Prime Minister Helen Clark, despite widespread opposition to the card on the grounds of high cost.
Political scientist Bryce Edwards identified Clark's ability to lead stable governments as her most significant achievement, arguing that her ability to work with a variety of coalition partners—including the Alliance, Jim Anderton's Progressive Party, Green, United Future and New Zealand First—consolidated public support for MMP.

Michael Laws

LawsLaws, Michael
However, Michael Laws (a former National Party MP who served as a New Zealand First campaign manager) claims that Peters had secretly decided to go with National significantly before this time, and that he merely used negotiations with Labour to encourage more concessions from National.
Laws has won several political positions, including two terms as a Member of the New Zealand Parliament for the National Party (1990–96) and New Zealand First (1996), two terms as Mayor of Whanganui (2004-2010), terms as a councillor on Whanganui District Council, Napier City Council, and Otago Regional Council, and terms as a member of a district health board.

Populism

populistpopulistsPopulist Movement
New Zealand First (Aotearoa Tuatahi), commonly abbreviated to NZ First, is a nationalist and populist political party in New Zealand.
New Zealand First has presented a more lasting populist platform; long-time party leader Winston Peters has been characterised by some as a populist who uses anti-establishment rhetoric, though in a uniquely New Zealand style.

Deputy Prime Minister of New Zealand

Deputy Prime MinisterDeputy Prime Ministers of New Zealand
Under the terms of a detailed coalition agreement, Peters would serve as Deputy Prime Minister, and would also hold the specially created office of Treasurer (senior to the Minister of Finance).
The current Deputy Prime Minister is Winston Peters, the Leader of New Zealand First.

1999 New Zealand general election

1999 election19991999 general election
In the 1999 election New Zealand First lost much of its support, receiving only 4% of the party vote.
After the 1996 election National had formed a coalition with the populist New Zealand First party and its controversial leader, Winston Peters.