New school hip hop

new schoolnew school of hip hop artistsnew school" hip hop
The new school of hip hop was a movement in hip hop music starting 1983–84 with the early records of Run–D.M.C.wikipedia
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Hip hop music

Hip hophip-hoprap
The new school of hip hop was a movement in hip hop music starting 1983–84 with the early records of Run–D.M.C. and LL Cool J.
New school hip hop was the second wave of hip hop music, originating in 1983–84 with the early records of Run-D.M.C. and LL Cool J.

Run-DMC

Run-D.M.C.Run–D.M.C.Run DMC
The new school of hip hop was a movement in hip hop music starting 1983–84 with the early records of Run–D.M.C. and LL Cool J.
Along with LL Cool J, the Beastie Boys, and Public Enemy, the group pioneered new school hip hop music.

Rapping

rapperraprappers
It was notable for taunts and boasts about rapping, and socio-political commentary, both delivered in an aggressive, self-assertive style.
Artists and critics often credit Rakim with creating the overall shift from the more simplistic old school flows to more complex flows near the beginning of hip hop's new school – Kool Moe Dee says, "any emcee that came after 1986 had to study Rakim just to know what to be able to do. Rakim, in 1986, gave us flow and that was the rhyme style from 1986 to 1994. from that point on, anybody emceeing was forced to focus on their flow".

Juice Crew

DJ PoloTJ SwanD.J. Polo
The innovations of Run-D.M.C., MC Shan and LL Cool J, and new school producers such as Larry Smith, and Rick Rubin of Def Jam, were quickly advanced on by the Beastie Boys, Marley Marl and his Juice Crew MCs, Boogie Down Productions, Public Enemy, and Eric B. & Rakim.
Founded by producer Marley Marl and radio DJ Mr. Magic, and housed by Tyrone Williams' record label Cold Chillin' Records, the Juice Crew helped introduce New School artists Big Daddy Kane, Biz Markie, Roxanne Shanté and Kool G Rap.

LL Cool J

L.L. Cool JJames Todd SmithI Need a Beat
The new school of hip hop was a movement in hip hop music starting 1983–84 with the early records of Run–D.M.C. and LL Cool J.
Radios release coincided with the growing new school scene and subculture, which also marked the beginning of hip-hop's "golden age" and the replacement of old school hip hop.

Run-D.M.C. (album)

Run-D.M.C.Run–D.M.C.debut album
The group's early singles are collected on their eponymous debut (Profile, 1984), introducing rock references in "Rock Box", and recognized then and now as the best album of hip hop's early years.
"It's Like That" is judged by many to be the first hardcore rap song, and the first new school hip-hop recording.

Radio (LL Cool J album)

RadioI Can Give You MoreRadio'' (LL Cool J album)
Both were on his debut album for Def Jam, 1985's Radio ("Reduced by Rick Rubin", read the liner notes), which contained another minimalist b-boy classic with shards of rock guitar, "Rock the Bells".
Radio belonged to a pivotal moment in hip hop's culture and history, reflecting the new school and ghettoblaster subculture in the United States during the mid-1980s.

Whodini

Jalil HutchinsGrandmaster DeeFive Minutes of Funk
The other production credit on Raising Hell went to Run's brother, Russell Simmons; he ran Rush Artist Management, now Rush Communications, which as well as handling Run-D.M.C., managed the Beastie Boys, LL Cool J, Whodini and Public Enemy.
This new school style had been similarly done almost a year previously on the multi-million selling debut albums by L.L. Cool J and the Beastie Boys, as many groups had already turned to the kind of rap and rock music that crossed over easily, and Open Sesame failed to produce any real hits.

Electro (music)

electroelectro musicelectro-funk
Figures such as Flash and Bambaataa were involved in some early instances of moving the sound away from that of a live band, as in Flash's DJ track "The Adventures of Grandmaster Flash on the Wheels of Steel" (Sugar Hill, 1981), and even innovating popular new sounds and subgenres, as in the synthesizer-laden electro of Bambaataa's "Planet Rock" (Tommy Boy, 1982).
By the late 1980s, the genre evolved into what is known today as new school hip hop.

Winley Records

Paul WinleyWinleyPaul Winley Records
Bambaataa's first records, for instance, two versions of "Zulu Nation Throwdown" (Winley, 1980), were recorded with just drums and rhymes.
A new generation of acts appeared in the early to mid-1980s on labels like Def Jam, Profile and Cold Chillin', with a tougher image, musical style and lyrical delivery than their predecessors (see New school hip hop).

Saturday Night! – The Album

Saturday NightSaturday Night! - The Album
Philadelphia's Schoolly D self-released "Gangsta Boogie" in 1984, and "P.S.K. What Does It Mean?"/"Gucci Time" in 1985, leading to Saturday Night (Schoolly D, 1986, Jive, 1987).

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
Like the hip hop preceding it, it came predominantly from New York City.

Drum machine

drum programmingdrum machinesrhythm machine
The new school was initially characterized in form by drum machine led minimalism, often tinged with elements of rock.

Rock music

rockrock bandrock musician
The new school was initially characterized in form by drum machine led minimalism, often tinged with elements of rock.

Breakdancing

breakdanceb-boyb-boying
In image as in song its artists projected a tough, cool, street b-boy attitude.

Funk

funk musicfunkysynth-funk
These elements contrasted sharply with the funk and disco influenced outfits, novelty hits, live bands, synthesizers and party rhymes of artists prevalent in 1984, and rendered them old school.

Disco

disco musicdisco eraanti-disco backlash
These elements contrasted sharply with the funk and disco influenced outfits, novelty hits, live bands, synthesizers and party rhymes of artists prevalent in 1984, and rendered them old school.

Old-school hip hop

old school hip hopold schoolold school hip-hop
These elements contrasted sharply with the funk and disco influenced outfits, novelty hits, live bands, synthesizers and party rhymes of artists prevalent in 1984, and rendered them old school.

Golden age hip hop

golden agegolden age of hip hophip hop's golden age
More inclusively, golden age hip hop is a phrase usually framing the late 1980s in mainstream hip hop, said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation and influence, and associated with Public Enemy, KRS-One and his Boogie Down Productions, Eric B. & Rakim, Ultramagnetic MCs, De La Soul, A Tribe Called Quest, and the Jungle Brothers due to their themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, their experimental music, and their eclectic sampling.

Public Enemy (band)

Public EnemyPublic Enemy (group)PE
The innovations of Run-D.M.C., MC Shan and LL Cool J, and new school producers such as Larry Smith, and Rick Rubin of Def Jam, were quickly advanced on by the Beastie Boys, Marley Marl and his Juice Crew MCs, Boogie Down Productions, Public Enemy, and Eric B. & Rakim. More inclusively, golden age hip hop is a phrase usually framing the late 1980s in mainstream hip hop, said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation and influence, and associated with Public Enemy, KRS-One and his Boogie Down Productions, Eric B. & Rakim, Ultramagnetic MCs, De La Soul, A Tribe Called Quest, and the Jungle Brothers due to their themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, their experimental music, and their eclectic sampling.

KRS-One

Lawrence ParkerKRSLawrence "KRS-One" Parker
More inclusively, golden age hip hop is a phrase usually framing the late 1980s in mainstream hip hop, said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation and influence, and associated with Public Enemy, KRS-One and his Boogie Down Productions, Eric B. & Rakim, Ultramagnetic MCs, De La Soul, A Tribe Called Quest, and the Jungle Brothers due to their themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, their experimental music, and their eclectic sampling.

Boogie Down Productions

BDPHarmony
The innovations of Run-D.M.C., MC Shan and LL Cool J, and new school producers such as Larry Smith, and Rick Rubin of Def Jam, were quickly advanced on by the Beastie Boys, Marley Marl and his Juice Crew MCs, Boogie Down Productions, Public Enemy, and Eric B. & Rakim. More inclusively, golden age hip hop is a phrase usually framing the late 1980s in mainstream hip hop, said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation and influence, and associated with Public Enemy, KRS-One and his Boogie Down Productions, Eric B. & Rakim, Ultramagnetic MCs, De La Soul, A Tribe Called Quest, and the Jungle Brothers due to their themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, their experimental music, and their eclectic sampling.

Eric B. & Rakim

Eric B & RakimEric B. and RakimEric B and Rakim
The innovations of Run-D.M.C., MC Shan and LL Cool J, and new school producers such as Larry Smith, and Rick Rubin of Def Jam, were quickly advanced on by the Beastie Boys, Marley Marl and his Juice Crew MCs, Boogie Down Productions, Public Enemy, and Eric B. & Rakim. More inclusively, golden age hip hop is a phrase usually framing the late 1980s in mainstream hip hop, said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation and influence, and associated with Public Enemy, KRS-One and his Boogie Down Productions, Eric B. & Rakim, Ultramagnetic MCs, De La Soul, A Tribe Called Quest, and the Jungle Brothers due to their themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, their experimental music, and their eclectic sampling.

Ultramagnetic MCs

Ultramagnetic MCTR LoveCed Gee
More inclusively, golden age hip hop is a phrase usually framing the late 1980s in mainstream hip hop, said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation and influence, and associated with Public Enemy, KRS-One and his Boogie Down Productions, Eric B. & Rakim, Ultramagnetic MCs, De La Soul, A Tribe Called Quest, and the Jungle Brothers due to their themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, their experimental music, and their eclectic sampling.

De La Soul

Posdnousrap groupTrugoy the Dove
More inclusively, golden age hip hop is a phrase usually framing the late 1980s in mainstream hip hop, said to be characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation and influence, and associated with Public Enemy, KRS-One and his Boogie Down Productions, Eric B. & Rakim, Ultramagnetic MCs, De La Soul, A Tribe Called Quest, and the Jungle Brothers due to their themes of Afrocentricity and political militancy, their experimental music, and their eclectic sampling.