Newcastle upon Tyne

NewcastleNewcastle, EnglandNewcastle, United KingdomNewcastle-upon-TyneCity of Newcastle upon TyneNewcastle upon Tyne, EnglandCity of NewcastleEngland's famous coal portNewcastle upon Tyne, NorthumberlandNewcastle, Great Britain
Newcastle upon Tyne, commonly known as Newcastle, is a city in Tyne and Wear, North East England, 103 miles (166 km) south of Edinburgh and 277 miles (446 km) north of London on the northern bank of the River Tyne, 8.5 mi from the North Sea.wikipedia
7,559 Related Articles

North East England

North EastNorth East of Englandnorth-east
Newcastle upon Tyne, commonly known as Newcastle, is a city in Tyne and Wear, North East England, 103 miles (166 km) south of Edinburgh and 277 miles (446 km) north of London on the northern bank of the River Tyne, 8.5 mi from the North Sea.
There are three cities in the region: Newcastle upon Tyne, the largest, with a population of just under 280,000; Sunderland, also in the metropolitan county of Tyne and Wear; and Durham.

Northumbria University

Newcastle PolytechnicNorthumbriaUniversity of Northumbria
Newcastle also houses Newcastle University, a member of the Russell Group, as well as Northumbria University.
Northumbria University, officially the University of Northumbria at Newcastle, is a university located in Newcastle upon Tyne in the North East of England.

Tyne and Wear

Tyne & WearTWRTyne and Wear County Council
Newcastle upon Tyne, commonly known as Newcastle, is a city in Tyne and Wear, North East England, 103 miles (166 km) south of Edinburgh and 277 miles (446 km) north of London on the northern bank of the River Tyne, 8.5 mi from the North Sea.
It consists of the five metropolitan boroughs of South Tyneside, North Tyneside, City of Newcastle upon Tyne, Gateshead and City of Sunderland.

Tyneside

TyneTyneside Built-up Area774,891
Newcastle is the most populous city in the North East, and forms the core of the Tyneside conurbation, the eighth most populous urban area in the United Kingdom. From 1530, a royal act restricted all shipments of coal from Tyneside to Newcastle Quayside, giving a monopoly in the coal trade to a cartel of Newcastle burgesses known as the Hostmen.
Tyneside is a conurbation on the banks of the River Tyne in North East England which includes Newcastle upon Tyne, Gateshead, Tynemouth, Wallsend, South Shields, and Jarrow.

Northumberland

NorthumbrianCounty of NorthumberlandNorthumberland, England
Newcastle was part of the county of Northumberland until 1400, when it became a county of itself, a status it retained until becoming part of Tyne and Wear in 1974.
The county of Northumberland included Newcastle upon Tyne until 1400, when the city became a county of itself.

South Shields

ShieldsSouth Shields CBHerd Groyne
The course of the "Roman Wall" can be traced eastwards to the Segedunum Roman fort in Wallsend—the "wall's end"—and to the supply fort Arbeia in South Shields.
South Shields is a coastal town at the mouth of the River Tyne, England, about 3.7 mi downstream from Newcastle upon Tyne.

City status in the United Kingdom

city statuscitycathedral city
Newcastle upon Tyne, commonly known as Newcastle, is a city in Tyne and Wear, North East England, 103 miles (166 km) south of Edinburgh and 277 miles (446 km) north of London on the northern bank of the River Tyne, 8.5 mi from the North Sea.
Accordingly, Truro, St Albans, Liverpool, Newcastle upon Tyne and Wakefield were all officially designated as cities between 1877 and 1888.

Great North Run

BUPA Great North RunGreat NorthGreat North Run Half Marathon
Since 1981 the city has hosted the Great North Run, a half marathon which attracts over 57,000 runners each year.
Participants run between Newcastle upon Tyne and South Shields.

Tyne Bridge

TynebridgeGeorge V Bridge
Among its icons are Newcastle United football club and the Tyne Bridge.
The Tyne Bridge is a through arch bridge over the River Tyne in North East England, linking Newcastle upon Tyne and Gateshead.

Hostmen of Newcastle upon Tyne

HostmenHostmanHostmen Company of Freemen of Newcastle-upon-Tyne
From 1530, a royal act restricted all shipments of coal from Tyneside to Newcastle Quayside, giving a monopoly in the coal trade to a cartel of Newcastle burgesses known as the Hostmen.
The Hostmen of Newcastle upon Tyne were a cartel of businessmen who formed a monopoly to control the export of coal from the River Tyne in North East England.

Kingdom of Northumbria

NorthumbriaNorthumbrianNorthumbrians
After the Roman departure from Britain, completed in 410, Newcastle became part of the powerful Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Northumbria, and was known throughout this period as Monkchester.
Northumbria is also used in the names of some North East regional institutions, particularly the police force (Northumbria Police, which covers Northumberland and Tyne and Wear), a university (Northumbria University) based in Newcastle upon Tyne and Northumbria Army Cadet Force, as well as the regionalist Northumbrian Association.

History of Newcastle upon Tyne

Newcastleheavy engineeringMosley Street
In the 19th century, shipbuilding and heavy engineering were central to the city's prosperity; and the city was a powerhouse of the Industrial Revolution.
The history of Newcastle upon Tyne dates back almost 2,000 years, during which it has been controlled by the Romans, the Angles and the Norsemen amongst others.

Core Cities Group

Core CitiesThe Core Cities
Newcastle is a member of the English Core Cities Group and is a member of the Eurocities network of European cities.
The group was formed in 1995 and serves as a partnership of ten city councils: Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, Glasgow, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle, Nottingham and Sheffield.

Newcastle town wall

town wallNewcastle upon Tynetown walls
A 25 ft high stone wall was built around the town in the 13th century, to defend it from invaders during the Border war against Scotland.
The Newcastle town wall is a medieval defensive wall, and Scheduled Ancient Monument, in Newcastle upon Tyne, England.

Pons Aelius

Newcastle
The city developed around the Roman settlement Pons Aelius and was named after the castle built in 1080 by Robert Curthose, William the Conqueror's eldest son.
Pons Aelius (Latin for "Aelian Bridge"), or Newcastle Roman Fort, was an auxiliary castra and small Roman settlement on Hadrian's Wall in the Roman province of Britannia Inferior (northern England), situated on the north bank of the River Tyne close to the centre of present-day Newcastle upon Tyne, and occupied between the 2nd and 4th centuries AD.

Fenham Barracks

Fenham Barracks, Newcastle upon Tyne
A permanent military presence was established in the city with the completion of Fenham Barracks in 1806.
Fenham Barracks is a military installation in Barrack Road, Newcastle upon Tyne.

Great fire of Newcastle and Gateshead

catastrophic explosiongreat explosionGreat Fire in Newcastle and Gateshead
The Great fire of Newcastle and Gateshead was a tragic and spectacular series of events starting on Friday 6 October 1854, in which a substantial amount of property in the two North East of England towns was destroyed in a series of fires and an explosion which killed 53 and injured hundreds.
The towns of Newcastle upon Tyne and Gateshead sit opposite each other, on relatively steep slopes leading down to the River Tyne.

Newburn

Newburn UDNewburn-on-Tyne
In a bid to gain Newcastle and the Tyne, Cromwell's allies, the Scots, captured the town of Newburn.
Newburn is in the Newcastle upon Tyne district of Tyne and Wear and is part of the parliamentary constituency of Newcastle upon Tyne North.

List of urban areas in the United Kingdom

built-up areaUnited Kingdom's third largest conurbationurban area
Newcastle is the most populous city in the North East, and forms the core of the Tyneside conurbation, the eighth most populous urban area in the United Kingdom.

Victoria Tunnel (Newcastle)

Victoria TunnelVictoria tunnels
The Victorian industrial revolution brought industrial structures that included the 2+1/2 mi Victoria Tunnel, built in 1842, which provided underground wagon ways to the staithes.
The Victoria Tunnel is a subterranean wagonway that runs under Newcastle upon Tyne, England, from the Town Moor down to the River Tyne.

Be-Ro

Innovations in Newcastle and surrounding areas included the development of safety lamps, Stephenson's Rocket, Lord Armstrong's artillery, Be-Ro flour, Joseph Swan's electric light bulbs, and Charles Parsons' invention of the steam turbine, which led to the revolution of marine propulsion and the production of cheap electricity.
Be-Ro is a food manufacturing business based in Newcastle upon Tyne.

Newcastle Cathedral

St Nicholas' ChurchNewcastleSt Nicholas' Cathedral
In 1882, Newcastle became the seat of an Anglican diocese, with St. Nicholas' Church becoming its cathedral.
The Cathedral Church of St Nicholas is a Church of England cathedral in Newcastle upon Tyne, England.

Centre for Life

Life Science CentreInternational Centre for LifeNewcastle Centre for Life
New developments at the turn of the 21st century included the Life Science Centre in 2000 and Millennium Bridge in 2001.
The Centre for Life is a science village in Newcastle upon Tyne where scientists, clinicians, educationalists and business people work to promote the advancement of the life sciences.

Hadrian's Wall

Roman WallWallHadrian
Fragments of Hadrian's Wall are visible in parts of Newcastle, particularly along the West Road.
The A69 and B6318 roads follow the course of the wall from Newcastle upon Tyne to Carlisle, then along the northern coast of Cumbria (south shore of the Solway Firth).

Coals to Newcastle

taking coals to Newcastlecarrying coals to Newcastleselling coal to Newcastle
The phrase taking coals to Newcastle was first recorded contextually in 1538.
It refers to the fact that historically, the economy of Newcastle upon Tyne in north-eastern England was heavily dependent on the distribution and sale of coal—by the time of the first known recording of the phrase in 1538, 15,000 tonnes of coal were being exported annually from the area —and therefore any attempt to sell coal to Newcastle would be doomed to fail because of the economic principle of supply.