A report on Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

The entrance to Ōrākei Marae, the cultural hub for Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.
The entrance to Ōrākei Marae, the cultural hub for Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.

Auckland-based Māori hapū in New Zealand.

- Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei
The entrance to Ōrākei Marae, the cultural hub for Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.

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Lower Northland Peninsula

Ngāti Whātua

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Māori iwi of the lower Northland Peninsula of New Zealand's North Island.

Māori iwi of the lower Northland Peninsula of New Zealand's North Island.

Lower Northland Peninsula
Lower Northland Peninsula

It comprises a confederation of four hapū (subtribes) interconnected both by ancestry and by association over time: Te Uri-o-Hau, Te Roroa, Te Taoū, and Ngāti Whātua-o-Ōrākei.

Iwi

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Iwi are the largest social units in New Zealand Māori society.

Iwi are the largest social units in New Zealand Māori society.

Each iwi contains a number of hapū; among the hapū of the Ngāti Whātua iwi, for example, are Te Uri-o-Hau, Te Roroa, Te Taoū, and Ngāti Whātua-o-Ōrākei.

Auckland

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Large metropolitan city in the North Island of New Zealand.

Large metropolitan city in the North Island of New Zealand.

Print of a painting of Auckland port, 1857
Queen Street (c.1889); painting by Jacques Carabain. Most of the buildings depicted were demolished during rampant modernisation in the 1970s.
Looking east over the area that became Wynyard Quarter with the Auckland CBD in the middle distance, c. 1950s.
The urbanised extent of Auckland (red),
Satellite view of the Auckland isthmus and Waitematā Harbour
A view over Chelsea Sugar Refinery's lower dam towards Auckland Harbour Bridge and the CBD
The volcanic Rangitoto Island in the Hauraki Gulf, with the remnant of Takaroro / Mount Cambria in the foreground (yellow, grassy reserve) . Viewed from Takarunga / Mount Victoria over Devonport.
Asians are Auckland's fastest growing ethnic group. Here, lion dancers perform at the Auckland Lantern Festival.
St Matthew-in-the-City, a historic Anglican church in the Auckland CBD
Projection of the Auckland Region's population growth to 2031
Pedestrians on Vulcan Lane in the CBD
The modern section of the Auckland Art Gallery, completed in 2011
Albert Park in central Auckland
View from the top of Maungawhau / Mount Eden
Landmark House
The twin towers of the National Bank Centre are among the tallest buildings in Auckland
Terraced housing built in 1897 as residential buildings and associated place houses for John Endean
Auckland Town Hall entrance on Queen Street
Old Government House, former residence of the Governor
The University of Auckland clock tower building is a 'Category I' historic place, completed in 1926
Railway lines serve the western, southern and eastern parts of the city from the Britomart Transport Centre.
Aerial view of the Auckland Harbour Bridge
The Auckland CBD skyline and Harbour Bridge at sunset.
The International Terminal at Auckland International Airport
Otahuhu Power Station's 404MW combined cycle turbine, also known as Otahuhu B

From the 1740s onwards, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei became the major influential force on the Auckland isthmus.

Kaiwaka

Te Uri-o-Hau

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Māori iwi of the greater Ngāti Whātua confederation.

Māori iwi of the greater Ngāti Whātua confederation.

Kaiwaka
Kaiwaka

While some have considered it to be merely a hapū (subtribe) of Ngāti Whātua, Te Uri-o-Hau can act independently of the other 3 principle iwi of the Ngāti Whātua Confederation (Ngāti Whātua-o-Ōrākei, Te Roroa and Te Taoū).

Ōrākei

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Suburb of Auckland city, in the North Island of New Zealand.

Suburb of Auckland city, in the North Island of New Zealand.

The entrance to Ōrākei Marae
The Michael Joseph Savage Memorial

Takaparawhau / Bastion Point is the location of Ōrākei Marae and its Tumutumuwhenua wharenui (meeting house) is a traditional tribal meeting ground for the Ngāti Whātua iwi (tribe) and their Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Ngā Oho, Te Taoū and Te Uri hapū (sub-tribes).

Parakai

Te Taoū

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Māori iwi of Northland and the Auckland Region in New Zealand.

Māori iwi of Northland and the Auckland Region in New Zealand.

Parakai
Parakai

Together with Te Uri-o-Hau, Te Roroa and Ngāti Whātua-o-Ōrākei, it comprises the iwi (tribe) of Ngāti Whātua.

Bastion Point seen from the fishing pier jutting out into the Waitematā Harbour.

Bastion Point

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Coastal piece of land in Ōrākei, Auckland, New Zealand, overlooking the Waitematā Harbour.

Coastal piece of land in Ōrākei, Auckland, New Zealand, overlooking the Waitematā Harbour.

Bastion Point seen from the fishing pier jutting out into the Waitematā Harbour.
A marae on Takaparawhau in the 1890s.
Bastion Point activist campaign at Nambassa alternatives festival 1981.
Grave and memorial near Bastion Point.
The entrance to Ōrākei Marae, the cultural hub for Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, who own most of the land again, call it Takaparawhau, which, along with Ōkahu Bay, form Whenua Rangatira, which is vested in Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei for the common use and benefit of Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and citizens of Auckland, and is managed by the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board.

The volcanic peak Maungakiekie / One Tree Hill was the seat of power for Kiwi Tāmaki, and was the location of an elaborate pā complex

Kiwi Tāmaki

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Māori warrior and paramount chief of the Waiohua confederation in Tāmaki Makaurau (modern-day Auckland isthmus).

Māori warrior and paramount chief of the Waiohua confederation in Tāmaki Makaurau (modern-day Auckland isthmus).

The volcanic peak Maungakiekie / One Tree Hill was the seat of power for Kiwi Tāmaki, and was the location of an elaborate pā complex
The Ngāti Whātua settlements along the Kaipara River, Waitūoro and Mimihānui (near modern-day Parakai and Helensville) were the site of Waiohua's attack on Te Taoū
The site of Te-Rangi-hinganga-tahi, looking south towards Parau. Much of the battlefield is covered by the modern Lower Nihotupu Reservoir

Kiwi Tāmaki's direct descendants through his son Rangimatoru became the chiefs of the Te Ākitai Waiohua iwi based in South Auckland and around the Manukau Harbour, while relatives of Kiwi Tāmaki were married to members of Te Taoū who stayed in the region, eventually becoming the modern hapū Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, based on the Auckland isthmus and Waitematā Harbour.

Mangere Bridge suburb

Te Ākitai Waiohua

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Māori iwi of the southern part of the Auckland Region of New Zealand.

Māori iwi of the southern part of the Auckland Region of New Zealand.

Mangere Bridge suburb
Mangere Bridge suburb

Kiwi Tāmaki had a surviving son named Rangimatoru, who lived in South Auckland with Ngā Oho, a hapū of Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei formed by intermarriages between Ngāti Whātua and Waiohua people.

A view of the Waitematā Harbour looking nort-west towards the Auckland Harbour Bridge

Waitematā Harbour

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<mapframe text="Location and extent of Waitematā Harbour in relation to Auckland" width=270 height=300 zoom=10 latitude=-36.830 longitude=174.700>

<mapframe text="Location and extent of Waitematā Harbour in relation to Auckland" width=270 height=300 zoom=10 latitude=-36.830 longitude=174.700>

A view of the Waitematā Harbour looking nort-west towards the Auckland Harbour Bridge
The Auckland City skyline from the Waitematā Harbour
The eastern edge of Herne Bay, one of the wooded beach reserves typical of the harbour.
A container ship sailing out of the harbour
The Auckland waterfront, one of the most popular areas of Waitematā Harbour
A sketch by John Johnson (1794-1848) of Waitematā Harbour as seen from the suburb of Ponsonby
Waitematā Harbour with the Sky Tower and Maungawhau / Mount Eden (behind Sky Tower) in the centre, as seen from the North Shore somewhere between Bayswater Marina (left) and the Harbour Bridge (out of frame, to the right).

In the late 18th century and early 19th century, the waters were fished together by Ngāti Whātua-o-Ōrākei and Ngāti Pāoa.