Niš

NaissusNiš, SerbiaNishNisCity of NišNis, SerbiaNişNysusNaissus (Niš)Navissos
Niš (, ; names in other languages) is the third largest city in Serbia and the administrative center of the Nišava District., the city proper has a population of 183,164, while its administrative area (City of Niš) has a population of 260,237 inhabitants.wikipedia
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List of cities in Serbia

TowncityCities and towns
Niš (, ; names in other languages) is the third largest city in Serbia and the administrative center of the Nišava District.
Six cities (Belgrade, Novi Sad, Niš, Požarevac, Vranje and Užice) comprise several city municipalities.

Niš Constantine the Great Airport

NišNiš AirportConstantine the Great Airport
Constantine the Great Airport is Niš's international airport.
Niš Constantine the Great Airport, located 4 km northwest of downtown Niš in the suburbs of Medoševac and Popovac.

Serbia

SRBRepublic of SerbiaSerbian
Niš (, ; names in other languages) is the third largest city in Serbia and the administrative center of the Nišava District.
The Celtic tribe of Scordisci settled throughout the area in the 3rd century BC and formed a tribal state, building several fortifications, including their capital at Singidunum (present-day Belgrade) and Naissos (present-day Niš).

Nišava District

NišavaNisava DistrictNišavski okrug
Niš (, ; names in other languages) is the third largest city in Serbia and the administrative center of the Nišava District.
The administrative center of the district is the city of Niš.

Mediana

Mediana - Brzi Brod
In 364 AD, the imperial Villa Mediana 3 km was the site where emperors Valentinian and Valens met and divided the Roman Empire into halves which they would rule as co-emperors
Mediana is an important archeological site from the late Roman period, located in the eastern suburb of the Serbian city of Niš.

Skull Tower

Cele kulastone towerĆele kula
The tower is known as the Skull Tower (Ćele Kula).
Skull Tower (Ћеле Кула; Ćele kula, ) is a stone structure embedded with human skulls located in Niš, Serbia.

Remesiana

Constantine created the Dacia Mediterranea province, of which Naissus was the capital, which also included Remesiana on the Via Militaris and the towns of Pautalia and Germania.
It was on the route of ancient Via Militaris road between Naissus and Serdica in Dacia Ripensis.

Kingdom of Serbia

SerbiaSerbiankingdom
After about 400 years of Ottoman rule, the city was liberated in 1878 and became part of the Principality of Serbia, though not without great bloodshed—remnants of which can be found throughout the city.
Bulgarians successfully repelled the Serbs after the decisive victory at the Battle of Slivnitsa and advanced into Serbian territory taking Pirot and clearing the way to Niš.

Constantius III

ConstantiusFlavius Constantius
Founded by the Celtic Scordisci in 279 BC, the city would serve as the birthplace of three Roman emperors: Constantine the Great, the first Christian emperor and the founder of Constantinople; Constantius III; and Justin I.
Constantius was born in Naissus, Moesia at an unknown date.

Via Militaris

Via Diagonalisroad to Constantinoplevia miltaris
Constantine created the Dacia Mediterranea province, of which Naissus was the capital, which also included Remesiana on the Via Militaris and the towns of Pautalia and Germania.
Niš), Serdica (mod.

Sanjak of Niš

Sanjak of NișSanjak of NişNiš
According to Ottoman statistics during the Tanzimat the population of Sanjak of Niš was treated as Bulgarian and according to French travelers such as Jérôme-Adolphe Blanqui and Ami Boue in 1837/1841.
The Sanjak of Niš (Niş Sancağı, Niški Sandžak, Нишки санджак/Nishki sandzhak, Sanxhaku i Nishit) was one of the sanjaks of the Ottoman Empire and its county town was Niš.

Serbian-Turkish Wars (1876–1878)

Serbian–Ottoman War (1876–78)Serbo-Turkish WarSerbian-Turkish Wars (1876-1878)
Niš was finally liberated during the Serbian-Turkish Wars (1876-1878). During the Serbian–Ottoman War (1876–1878) the Albanian neighbourhood was burned and some of the Muslim population of Niš fled to the Ottoman vilayet of Kosovo resettling in Pristina where they dominated trade while others went to Skopje.
The Serbs formed five corps and attacked Ottoman troops to the south, taking the cities of Niš, Pirot, Leskovac and Vranje one after another.

Stefan Nemanja

NemanjaSaint SimeonSimeon
By 1188, Niš became the capital of Serbian king Stefan Nemanja.
Nemanja met Emperor Manuel in Niš in 1162, who gave him the region of Dubočica to rule over and declared him independent.

Aiadava

AeadabaAiadaba
In the Iron Age, the Thracians dominated the region, with one of their chief settlements being the nearby Aiadava; specifically, the Triballi are mentioned as inhabiting this region as early as 424 BC.
After the Romans conquered Moesia in the 75 BC, the new castrum (imperial domain with estates) and municipium was known initially as Ulpianorum and then Remesiana (Moesi) and laid on the Via Militaris road, between Naissus and Serdica.

Air battle over Niš

air war on November 7, 1944
The city was also the site of a unique and accidental friendly fire air war on November 7, 1944 between the air forces of the United States and Soviet Union.
The air battle over Niš occurred on 7 November 1944 over Niš, in Serbia, between the Air Forces of the United States and the Soviet Union in World War II due to both countries mistaking the other for Germans.

Names of European cities in different languages (M–P)

names in other languagesOther names of Plovdivother names
Niš (, ; names in other languages) is the third largest city in Serbia and the administrative center of the Nišava District.

Orient Express

Orient-Expressfamous European trainSimplon-Orient Express
Since 1885, Niš was the last station of the Orient Express, until the railroad was built between Niš and Sofia in 1888.
In 1885, another route began operations, this time reaching İstanbul via rail from Vienna to Belgrade and Niš, carriage to Plovdiv, and rail again to İstanbul.

Niš rebellion (1841)

Niš rebellion1841, after a failed uprisingNiš Uprising (1841)
In the 19th century Niš was an important town, but populated by Bulgarians in the 19th century, when the Niš rebellion broke out in 1841.
The Niš rebellion was a short-lived Christian uprising (5–26 April 1841) that broke out in the Ottoman nahiya (sub-districts) of Niš, Pirot, Vranje and Toplica, led by Miloje Jovanović and Nikola Srndaković-Srndak.

Battle of Čegar

Battle of Čegar HillČegarat Čegar
During the First Serbian Uprising in 1809, Serbian revolutionaries attempted to liberate Niš in the famous Battle of Čegar.
Fought on the Čegar hill situated between the villages of Donji Matejevac and Kamenica near Niš in what is today southeastern Serbia, it ended in an Ottoman victory.

Russian-Serbian Humanitarian Center

In April 2012, the Russian-Serbian Humanitarian Center was established in the city of Niš.
RSHC) is an intergovernmental nonprofit organization with the headquarters in Niš, Serbia.

Aeroput

The national airline Aeroput included Niš as a regular destination for the route Belgrade—Niš—Skopje—Thessaloniki in 1930.
When the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes was established in December 1918, two-seaters Breguet 14 flew a regular route from Novi Sad through Belgrade and Niš to Skopje almost daily.

Stefan the First-Crowned

Stefan NemanjićStefanStefan Prvovenčani
Stefan Nemanjić later regained the region.
In 1203 the Bulgarian army attacked Vukan, annexing Niš.

Expulsion of the Albanians 1877–1878

fledexpelledexpelled most of the Muslim Albanian population
During the Serbian–Ottoman War (1876–1878) the Albanian neighbourhood was burned and some of the Muslim population of Niš fled to the Ottoman vilayet of Kosovo resettling in Pristina where they dominated trade while others went to Skopje.
The Muslims in the cities of Niš and Pirot were Turkish-speaking; Vranje and Leskovac were Turkish- and Albanian-speaking; Prokuplje and Kuršumlija were Albanian-speaking.

Celebration of 1700 years of Edict of Milan in Niš

celebration of 1700 years of Constantine's Edict of MilanCelebration of 1700 years of the Edict of Milan
In 2013, the city was host to the celebration of 1700 years of Constantine's Edict of Milan.
Constantine the Great, who wrote the Edict of Milan turned "the world history in a new direction, seeking to certain laws favoring Christianity," linking the three cities from different parts of Europe and Asia, Austrian Carnuntum, Serbian Niš (in which Constantine was born), and Turkish Izmit.

Clinical Centre of Niš

In December 2017, a new building of Clinical Centre of Niš spreading over 45,000 square meters was opened.
КЦН / KCN) is a medical centre located in Niš, Serbia.