Nigeria

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Ceremonial Igbo pot from 9th-century Igbo-Ukwu
Yoruba copper mask of Obalufon from the city of Ife c. 1300
Royal Benin ivory mask, one of Nigeria's most recognized artifacts. Benin Empire, 16th century.
Frederick Lugard, 1st Baron Lugard who as Governor-General of Nigeria led the amalgamation of the Northern Nigeria Protectorate and Southern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914.
Emir of Kano with cavalry, 1911
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1953 postage stamp with portrait of Queen ElizabethII
Nnamdi Azikiwe, first president of Nigeria from 1963 to 1966
The Republic of Biafra in June 1967, when it declared its independence from the rest of Nigeria
Shehu Shagari was the first democratically elected President of Nigeria from 1979 to 1983.
Olusegun Obasanjo was civilian President of Nigeria from 1999 to 2007.
Muhammadu Buhari is currently serving as President of Nigeria, since 2015.
Nigerian National Assembly, Abuja
Nigerian Army self-propelled anti-aircraft gun
Nigerian Air Force Mil Mi-35P
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Abuja
Former Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan (centre) with United States President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama in August 2014
Map of Nigeria with administrative divisions
Climate map of Nigeria
Palm plantation in Delta State
Rainforest range of Obudu Mountains
Clouds kissing the mountains of Obudu
A proportional representation of Nigeria exports, 2019
Farm ploughing in Kwara State
Oil facility at Bonny Island, Rivers State
PTDF – Petroleum Technology Development Fund
Countries by natural gas proven reserves (2014). Nigeria has the largest reserves in Africa.
Innoson vehicles
Steel factory in Ajaokuta
Meridien Akwa Ibom golf course park
Lekki Beach in Lagos
Substation in Abuja
Railway system in Nigeria, 2022
Second Niger bridge at Onitsha, artistic impression
SpaceX launch of CRS-11 with Nigeria EduSat-1 on board in 2017
Population density (persons per square kilometer) in Nigeria
Map of Nigeria's linguistic groups
The Abuja National Mosque
National Church of Nigeria, Abuja
Nigerian states that implement some form of sharia law (in green)
A hospital in Abuja
The University of Lagos
A Nigerian police officer at the Eyo festival in Lagos
End SARS is a decentralised social movement and series of mass protests against police brutality in Nigeria.
Nigerian women in tech
Lisa Folawiyo, Fashion Designer From Nigeria
An Eyo Iga Olowe Salaye masquerade jumping
Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart, Africa's most popular and best selling literary piece ever, has been translated into more than forty languages.
Wizkid is a popular musician in Nigeria, Africa and worldwide.
Nigeria at the 2018 FIFA World Cup
Nigerian football supporters at the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia
Imota Rice Mill, close to Lagos
Oil and gas fields in the Niger delta
The world's biggest distilling column at the Dangote refinery in comparison
Pharmacy in Epe
Ituen Basi, Lagos based Nigerian fashion designer

Country in West Africa.

- Nigeria

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Lagos

Aerial view of Lagos in 1929
Map of Lagos' initial city boundaries, showing its contemporary districts. This definition is rarely used in the present day; the expanded metropolitan area is now a more accepted definition of Lagos.
Lekki Conservation Centre canopy walk
Lagos Marina
Victoria Island
Civic Towers, Victoria Island, Lagos
A map showing the 16 LGAs making up Lagos Metropolitan Area
Lagos market scene
Apapa port
Filming
Entrance of the Lekki Free Trade Zone
Construction of the Dangote Raffinerie
Tree growing in Freedom Park
Tinubu Square
National Stadium.
The Lagos Black Heritage Festival Parade, 2012
Lekki Beach in Lagos
The Cathedral Church of Christ Marina on Lagos Island
Arewa Traditional Kitchen
Lagos Business School
Lagos Business School's Cafeteria
Dowen College in Lagos
University of Lagos
Toll gates and roads at the Lekki-Ẹpẹ Expressway
Lagos, its ports, airports, free trade zone and light rail system
Distilling column of the Dangote refinery in compare to a Saturn rocket
Pharmacy in Epe

Lagos (Nigerian English: ; Èkó) is the largest city in Nigeria and the second most populous city in Africa, with a population of 15.3 million as of 2022 within the city proper.

The totality of Africa seen by the Apollo 17 crew

Africa

World's second-largest and second-most populous continent, after Asia in both cases.

World's second-largest and second-most populous continent, after Asia in both cases.

The totality of Africa seen by the Apollo 17 crew
Lucy, an Australopithecus afarensis skeleton discovered 24 November 1974 in the Awash Valley of Ethiopia's Afar Depression
Saharan rock art in the Fezzan
Diachronic map showing African empires spanning roughly 500 BCE to 1500 CE
The Ezana Stone records King Ezana's conversion to Christianity and his subjugation of various neighboring peoples, including Meroë.
The intricate 9th-century bronzes from Igbo-Ukwu, in Nigeria displayed a level of technical accomplishment that was notably more advanced than European bronze casting of the same period.
Ruins of Great Zimbabwe (flourished eleventh to fifteenth centuries)
Major slave trading regions of Africa, 15th–19th centuries.
Comparison of Africa in the years 1880 and 1913
Topography of Africa
Today, the African Plate is moving over Earth's surface at a speed of 0.292° ± 0.007° per million years, relative to the "average" Earth (NNR-MORVEL56)
The main biomes in Africa.
Africa Water Precipitation
Savanna at Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania
African countries by GDP (PPP) per capita in 2020
A map showing religious distribution in Africa
A simplistic view of language families spoken in Africa
The rock-hewn Church of Saint George in Lalibela, Ethiopia is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Nok figure (5th century BC-5th century AD)
A musician from South Africa
Best results of African men's national football teams at the FIFA World Cup
An animated map shows the order of independence of African nations, 1950–2011
Africa's wars and conflicts, 1980–96 {{legend|#cc4c02|Major Wars/Conflict (100,000 + Casualties)}}{{legend|#fe9929|Minor Wars/Conflict}}{{legend|#fed98e|Other Conflicts}}
Political map of Africa in 2021

Algeria is Africa's largest country by area, and Nigeria is its largest by population.

Colonial Nigeria

Nigeria (red) British possessions in Africa (pink) 1914
Map of Negroland and Guinea including the Slave Coast, 1736, by London cartographer Hermann Moll
Nigeria (red) British possessions in Africa (pink) 1914
Flag of the Lagos Colony (1886–1906)
Queen Victoria on a stamp of the Niger Coast Protectorate, 1894
Ensign of the Royal Niger Company (1888–1899)
British stamps used in 1898 at Akassa by the Royal Niger Company
King Koko in His War Canoe, London Daily Graphic, 30 March 1895; depicting King Frederick William Koko—onetime antagonist to the Royal Niger Company
Undated British archival photo of a locomotive in Nigeria
A map displaying Southern and Northern Nigeria, 1914
Yoruba sculpture from colonial period depicting the British technique of indirect rule
Emir of Kano, with cavalry, photographed in 1911
Sculptural representation of Africa at the Colonial Office building on Whitehall street; created by Henry Hugh Armstead
Looms in Lagos, photographed in 1910–1913 by H. Hunting of the Patterson Zuchonis trading company
Colonial Lagos circa 1910

Colonial Nigeria was ruled by the British Empire from the mid-nineteenth century until 1960 when Nigeria achieved independence.

The de facto independent Republic of Biafra in June 1967

Nigerian Civil War

The de facto independent Republic of Biafra in June 1967
The new republic adopted the Flag of Biafra which was unveiled on the 30th May 1967.
The proposed breakup of the East, West and Northern regions following Gowon's military decree.
Flag of the Republic of Benin
Lynn Garrison in cockpit of his F4U-7 Corsair 1966
Control over petroleum in the Niger Delta was a paramount military objective during the war.
A makeshift airport in Calabar, Nigeria, where relief efforts to aid famine victims were deployed by helicopter teams.
Malmö MFI-9 Biafra Baby two-view silhouette
A child suffering the effects of kwashiorkor, a disease brought on due to a severe dietary protein deficiency. Pictures of the famine caused by the Nigerian blockade garnered worldwide sympathy for the Biafrans. It was regarded in the Western press as the genocide of two million people, half of them children.
New Nigerian newspaper page 7 January 1970. End of the Nigerian civil war with Biafra. "Owerri is now captured. Ojukwu flees his enclave." Photographs of the military Obasanjo, Jallo, Bissalo, Gowon.
A severely malnourished woman during the war.
Disabled Biafran war veterans in 2017.

The Nigerian Civil War (6 July 1967 – 15 January 1970; also known as the Nigerian-Biafran War or the Biafran War) was a civil war fought between the government of Nigeria and the Republic of Biafra, a secessionist state which had declared its independence from Nigeria in 1967.

Oba Sir Adeniji Adele II, the 19th Eleko of Lagos.

Nigerian Chieftaincy

Oba Sir Adeniji Adele II, the 19th Eleko of Lagos.
King Jaja I, the 1st Amanyanaboh of Opobo.
Alhaji Muhammadu Sanusi II, the 14th Emir of Kano.
Prince Jaja Wachuku, the Ugo of Ngwaland.
Chief Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti, an Oloye of the Western House of Chiefs.
Chief Agbani Darego, an Oloye of Lagos.
Chief Antonio Deinde Fernandez, the Apesin Ola of Egbaland, his wife Aduke, daughters Atinuke and Abimbola, and family friend Dr. Nelson Mandela.

The Nigerian Chieftaincy is the chieftaincy system that is native to Nigeria.

Northern Region, Nigeria

Area of the Nok culture
Map of Nigeria, 1909

Northern Nigeria was an autonomous division within Nigeria, distinctly different from the southern part of the country, with independent customs, foreign relations and security structures.

A map of the Roman Republic

Fourth Nigerian Republic

A map of the Roman Republic

The Fourth Republic is the current republican government of Nigeria.

A group of Yoruba people at a public event

Yoruba people

A group of Yoruba people at a public event
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Degree of Presence of The Yoruba and derived' Ede 
groups in Nigeria, Benin & Togo at Subnational levels
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Palace of the King of Oyo circa 1900s - Colorized
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Anna Hinderer church and mission house at Ibadan, 1850s
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Yoruba door, wood carvings; used to record events c. 1910
Early 19th century Yoruba architecture showing their unique inner courtyard layout used as a safe space for storing livestock and a space where children could play
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Gbedu drummers
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Wooden Ere Ibeji figures representing twins. Yorubas have the highest twinning rate in the world.
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An older traditional Agbada clothing historically worn by Yoruba men. This exhibit was obtained in the town of Òkukù.
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African Languages Spoken in American Households
Commemoration of Black consciousness, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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Amala is a Yoruba food.<ref>{{cite book|url=https://www.google.com/books/edition/A_Vocabulary_of_the_Yoruba_Language/oXxBAAAAYAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=amala|title=A Vocabulary of the Yoruba Language|author=Owen Emeric Vidal|publisher=Seeleys|date=1852|isbn=9781976589218}}</ref>
Akara is a Yoruba bean fritter.<ref>{{cite book|url=https://www.google.com/books/edition/A_Vocabulary_of_the_Yoruba_Language/oXxBAAAAYAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=akara|title=A Vocabulary of the Yoruba Language|author=Owen Emeric Vidal|publisher=Seeleys|date=1852|isbn=9781976589218}}</ref>
Ofada rice is a Yoruba dish.<ref name="Olusegun Obasanjo 1983">{{cite book|url=https://www.google.com/books/edition/Management_in_Agriculture_Rural_Developm/JdrSAAAAMAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=%22ofada%20rice%22|title=Management in Agriculture & Rural Development: A Practicioner's View|author=Olusegun Obasanjo|date=1983|isbn=9789782399243}}</ref>
Ofada rice is traditionally in a leaf.
Moin Moin is a Yoruba steamed bean pudding.<ref>{{cite book|url=https://www.google.com/books/edition/Adim%C3%BA/w3r4Xx2059AC?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=%22moin+moin%22|title=Adimú: Gbogbó Tén'unjé Lukumí|author=Miguel Willie Ramos|publisher=Eleda.Org Publications|date=July 2012|isbn=9781877845109}}</ref>
A collection of foods eaten by Yorubas in general
Simple Iro and Buba with Gele<ref name="Esogwa C. Osuala 1988">{{cite book|url=https://www.google.com/books/edition/Fundamentals_of_Nigerian_Marketing/JfbTAAAAMAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=%22iro+and+buba%22&dq=%22iro+and+buba%22&printsec=frontcover|title=Fundamentals of Nigerian Marketing|author=Esogwa C. Osuala|date=1988|publisher=Pacific Publishers|isbn=9789782347299}}</ref>
Agbádá àti Fìlà<ref>{{cite book|url=https://www.google.com/books/edition/Yoruba_Dress/CzAqd4vGphoC?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=agbada+and+fila&dq=agbada+and+fila&printsec=frontcover|title=Yoruba Dress: A Systematic Case Study of Five Generations of a Lagos Family|author=Betty Marguerite Wass|date=1975|publisher=Michigan State University. Department of Family Ecology|isbn=9789782347299|pages=143–183}}</ref>
Iro and Bùbá, with Gele and Ipele. Blouse, wrapper and headgear<ref name="Esogwa C. Osuala 1988"/>
Bùbá àti Kèmbè. Agbada top with short baggy pants<ref>{{cite book|url=https://www.google.com/books/edition/A_Handbook_of_Nigerian_Culture/n1AuAQAAIAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=kembe|title=A Handbook of Nigerian Culture|author1=Frank Aig-Imoukhuede|author2=Nigeria. Federal Ministry of Information and Culture|date=1992|publisher=Department of Culture, Federal Ministry of Information and Culture|isbn=9789783131613|page=134}}</ref>
Iro and Bùbá, with Gele and Ipele made from Òfì<ref>{{cite book|url=https://www.google.com/books/edition/Aso_Oke_Yoruba/bH5djwEACAAJ?hl=en|title=Aso Oke Yoruba: A Tapestry of Love & Color, a Journey of Personal Discovery|author=Tola Adenle|date=February 2, 2016|publisher=CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform|isbn=9781523495221}}</ref>
Agbádá àti Sóró, Agbada and long slim pants<ref>{{cite book|url=https://www.google.com/books/edition/Lekki/o9EuAQAAIAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=They%20wear%20dresses%20like|title=Lekki|author=Bola researcher/writer Sebastian|date=1992|publisher=Public Information Department, Lagos State Ministry of Information, Culture, Youth & Sports|page=3}}</ref>
Ìró and Bùbá with gele<ref name="Esogwa C. Osuala 1988"/>

The Yoruba people (Ìran Yorùbá, Ọmọ Odùduwà, Ọmọ Káàárọ̀-oòjíire) are a West African ethnic group that mainly inhabits parts of Nigeria, Benin and Togo that constitute Yorubaland.

Igbo people

The Igbo people (, also ; also spelled Ibo and formerly also Iboe, Ebo, Eboe, Eboans, Heebo;

The Igbo people (, also ; also spelled Ibo and formerly also Iboe, Ebo, Eboe, Eboans, Heebo;

Bronze from the ninth century town of Igbo Ukwu, now at the British Museum
An Igbo man with facial scarifications, known as ichi, early 20th century
Three Igbo women in the early 20th century
Flag of the Republic of Biafra (1967–1970), sometimes regarded as the ethnic flag of the Igbo
Anklet beaten from a solid brass bar of the type once fashionable among Igbo women. Now in the collection of Wolverhampton Art Gallery. The leg-tube extends approx 7 cm each side of the 35 cm disc.
Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe is the most popular and renowned novel that deals with the Igbo and their traditional life.
Thatching with palm leaf mats, early 20th century
Traditional Igbo house/room from the Anambra area, 1967
Wooden sculpture of Ikenga, an Alusi, in the Musée du Quai Branly.
The Holy Ghost depicted as a dove on a relief in Onitsha
A modern Igbo wedding, Nnewi, Nigeria
Men wearing contemporary Isiagu with the ceremonial Igbo men's hat okpu agu
striped men's hat
Yam porridge (or yam pottage) is an Igbo dish known as awaị.
Igbo people celebrating the New Yam festival in Dublin, Ireland

natively Ṇ́dị́ Ìgbò) are an ethnic group in Nigeria.

Southern Nigeria Protectorate

Southern Nigeria (red) British possessions in Africa (pink) 1913
1914 map of Southern and Northern Nigeria by John Bartholomew & Co. of Edinburgh
Southern Nigeria (red) British possessions in Africa (pink) 1913

Southern Nigeria was a British protectorate in the coastal areas of modern-day Nigeria formed in 1900 from the union of the Niger Coast Protectorate with territories chartered by the Royal Niger Company below Lokoja on the Niger River.