Night of the Living Dead

Karl HardmanJudith RidleyMarilyn Eastman1968 film of the same namehorror film of the same name19681968 film1968 horror film of the same name1968 originalNight of the Laughing Dead
Night of the Living Dead is a 1968 American independent horror film written, directed, photographed and edited by George A. Romero, co-written by John Russo, and starring Duane Jones and Judith O'Dea.wikipedia
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George A. Romero

George RomeroRomeroLaurel Entertainment
Night of the Living Dead is a 1968 American independent horror film written, directed, photographed and edited by George A. Romero, co-written by John Russo, and starring Duane Jones and Judith O'Dea.
He is best known for his series of gruesome and satirical horror films about an imagined zombie apocalypse, beginning with Night of the Living Dead (1968).

Living Dead

The Living DeadDead SeriesDead trilogy
The story follows seven people who are trapped in a rural farmhouse in western Pennsylvania, which is besieged by a large and growing group of "living dead" monsters.
Living Dead is a blanket term for various films, series, and other forms of media that all originated from, and includes, the 1968 horror film Night of the Living Dead conceived by George A. Romero and John A. Russo.

John A. Russo

John RussoRusso, John A.
Night of the Living Dead is a 1968 American independent horror film written, directed, photographed and edited by George A. Romero, co-written by John Russo, and starring Duane Jones and Judith O'Dea. He directed and produced television commercials and industrial films for The Latent Image, in the 1960s, a company he co-founded with friends John Russo, and Russell Streiner.
John A. Russo (born February 2, 1939), sometimes credited as Jack Russo or John Russo, is an American screenwriter and film director most commonly associated with the 1968 horror classic film Night of the Living Dead.

Night of the Living Dead (film series)

Night of the Living DeadLiving DeadDead
Night of the Living Dead led to five subsequent films between 1978 and 2009, also directed by Romero, and inspired several remakes; the most well-known remake was released in 1990, directed by Tom Savini.
The Dead is a series of six zombie horror films created by George A. Romero beginning with the 1968 film Night of the Living Dead directed by Romero and co-written with John A. Russo.

Duane Jones

late actor
Night of the Living Dead is a 1968 American independent horror film written, directed, photographed and edited by George A. Romero, co-written by John Russo, and starring Duane Jones and Judith O'Dea.
Duane L. Jones (February 2, 1937 – July 22, 1988) was an American actor, best known for his leading role as Ben in the 1968 horror film Night of the Living Dead.

Tom Savini

T. Savini
Night of the Living Dead led to five subsequent films between 1978 and 2009, also directed by Romero, and inspired several remakes; the most well-known remake was released in 1990, directed by Tom Savini.
Savini directed Night of the Living Dead, the 1990 remake of Romero's 1968 Night of the Living Dead; his other directing work includes three episodes of the TV show Tales from the Darkside and one segment in The Theatre Bizarre.

Night of the Living Dead (1990 film)

Night of the Living Deadremake1990
Night of the Living Dead led to five subsequent films between 1978 and 2009, also directed by Romero, and inspired several remakes; the most well-known remake was released in 1990, directed by Tom Savini.
It is a remake of George A. Romero's 1968 horror film of the same name.

Russell Streiner

He directed and produced television commercials and industrial films for The Latent Image, in the 1960s, a company he co-founded with friends John Russo, and Russell Streiner.
Streiner is perhaps best known for his role as Johnny in Night of the Living Dead (1968).

There's Always Vanilla

The Affair
There's Always Vanilla (also known as The Affair ) is a 1971 romantic comedy film directed by George A. Romero and starring Raymond Laine, Judith Ridley, Roger McGovern, and Johanna Lawrence.

Dawn of the Dead (1978 film)

Dawn of the DeadDawn of the Dead'' (1978 film)1978 film
Sequels Dawn of the Dead (1978) and Day of the Dead (1985) were adapted from the two remaining parts.
It was the second film made in Romero's Night of the Living Dead series and shows in a larger scale the apocalyptic effects on society, though it contains no characters or settings from the film Night of the Living Dead.

Bill Hinzman

S. William Hinzman
At the suggestion of Bill Hinzman (the actor who played the zombie which first attacks Barbra in the graveyard and kills her brother Johnny at the beginning of the original film), composers Todd Goodman and Stephen Catanzarite composed an opera Night of the Living Dead based on the film.
Hinzman's first role was the cemetery zombie in the popular horror film Night of the Living Dead (1968).

I Am Legend (novel)

I Am LegendRichard Matheson's I Am LegendI Am A Legend
Romero drew inspiration from Richard Matheson's I Am Legend (1954), a horror novel about a plague that ravages a futuristic Los Angeles.
It was also an inspiration behind Night of the Living Dead (1968).

Judith O'Dea

Night of the Living Dead is a 1968 American independent horror film written, directed, photographed and edited by George A. Romero, co-written by John Russo, and starring Duane Jones and Judith O'Dea.
She is best known for her role as Barbra in the 1968 George A. Romero film Night of the Living Dead.

Ganja & Hess

Ganja and Hess
It is one of only two films in which the lead role was played by Duane Jones, best known for starring in the 1968 film Night of the Living Dead (though he had bit parts in other movies).

Exploitation film

exploitationexploitation filmsexploitation cinema
Maddrey adds, it "seem[s] as much like a documentary on the loss of social stability as an exploitation film".
Some of these films, such as Night of the Living Dead (1968), set trends and become historically important.

George Kosana

George Kosana (December 22, 1935 – December 30, 2016) was an American actor, best known for his role of Sheriff McClelland in George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead.

Keith Wayne

Keith Wayne (January 16, 1945 — September 9, 1995), born Ronald Keith Hartman, was an American actor known for his only role as Tom in the George A. Romero's cult film Night of the Living Dead (1968).

National Film Registry

United States National Film RegistryList of films preserved in the United States National Film RegistryLibrary of Congress National Film Registry
It eventually garnered critical acclaim and was selected in 1999 by the Library of Congress for preservation in the National Film Registry as a film deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

Day of the Dead (1985 film)

Day of the Dead Day of the Dead1985
Sequels Dawn of the Dead (1978) and Day of the Dead (1985) were adapted from the two remaining parts.
That rating is the lowest of the initial 3 films in Romero's Dead series with Night of the Living Dead having a 97% approval rating and Dawn of the Dead having a 93% approval rating.

Roger Ebert

RogerEbert.comEbertEbert, Roger
Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times chided theater owners and parents who allowed children access to the film with such potent content for a horror film they were entirely unprepared for: "I don't think the younger kids really knew what hit them," he said.
In 1969, his review of Night of the Living Dead was published in Reader's Digest.

Bill Cardille

Bill "Chilly Billy" CardilleChilly Billy“Chilly Billy” Bill Cardille
Cardille appeared in both the 1968 original version and the 1990 remake of Night of the Living Dead, in the television movie, The Assassination File, and in the documentary American Scary.

Bosco Chocolate Syrup

BoscoBosco chocolate milk
The blood, for example, was Bosco Chocolate Syrup drizzled over cast members' bodies.

The 100 Scariest Movie Moments

100 Scariest Movie Moments30 Even Scarier Movie MomentsBravo's 100 Scariest Movie Moments
9 on Bravo's The 100 Scariest Movie Moments.

Richard Matheson

Death ShipMatheson
Romero drew inspiration from Richard Matheson's I Am Legend (1954), a horror novel about a plague that ravages a futuristic Los Angeles.
Romero frequently acknowledged Matheson as an inspiration and listed the shambling vampire creatures that appear in The Last Man on Earth, the first film version of I Am Legend, as the inspiration for the zombie "ghouls" he envisioned in Night of the Living Dead

Elite Entertainment

In 2002, Elite Entertainment released a special edition DVD featuring the original cut.
Their first release was George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead (1968), which they distributed on LaserDisc in 1994.