Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors

999: Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors9 Hours, 9 Persons, 9 Doors999: The NovelAoi Kurashiki
Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors is an adventure video game developed by Chunsoft.wikipedia
110 Related Articles

Zero Escape

Zero Escape: The Nonary GamesZero Escape'' seriesAkane Kurashiki
It is the first installment in the Zero Escape series, and was released in Japan in 2009 and in North America in 2010 for the Nintendo DS.
The first two entries in the series, Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors (2009) and Zero Escape: Virtue's Last Reward (2012), were developed by Spike Chunsoft (formerly Chunsoft), while the third entry, Zero Time Dilemma (2016), was developed by Chime.

Zero Escape: Virtue's Last Reward

Virtue's Last Reward
The sequel, Zero Escape: Virtue's Last Reward, was released in 2012, which was followed by Zero Time Dilemma, released in 2016.
The game was developed as a result of the unexpected critical success that its predecessor, Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors, received in North America.

Zero Time Dilemma

The sequel, Zero Escape: Virtue's Last Reward, was released in 2012, which was followed by Zero Time Dilemma, released in 2016.
The game is the third entry in the Zero Escape series, following Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors (2009) and Virtue's Last Reward (2012).

Nonlinear gameplay

branching plot linenon-linearnonlinear
The player's decisions result in one of six branching storylines, each with a unique ending.
A recent acclaimed example is 999: Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors, where nearly every action and dialogue choice can lead to entirely new branching paths and endings.

Escape the room

escape-the-roomroom escapeescape game
The gameplay alternates between two types of sections: Escape sections, where the player completes puzzles in escape-the-room scenarios; and Novel sections, where the player reads the game's narrative and makes decisions that influence the story toward one of six different endings.
Elements of escape the room games can be found in other adventure games, such as such as Myst and Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors, where a complete puzzle is solved by evaluating the elements within a single room.

Jiro Ishii

Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors was developed by the Japanese game studio Chunsoft and directed by Kotaro Uchikoshi, and produced by Jiro Ishii.
He is best known for directing the live-action visual novel 428: Shibuya Scramble, producing the adventure video game Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors, and creating the original concept for the anime short Under the Dog which was funded on Kickstarter.

Shinji Hosoe

Sampling Masters MEGATroubadourSuper Sweep
The music was composed by Shinji Hosoe, while the characters were designed by Kinu Nishimura.
999: Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors (2009)

Kotaro Uchikoshi

Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors was developed by the Japanese game studio Chunsoft and directed by Kotaro Uchikoshi, and produced by Jiro Ishii.
He implemented this idea in Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors (2009), the first game in which he served as the director.

Aksys Games

AksysAksys Games, Inc
The localization was handled by Aksys Games; they worked by the philosophy of keeping true to the spirit of the original Japanese version, aiming for natural-sounding English rather than following the original's exact wording. The North American localization of the game was handled by Aksys Games; Chunsoft was introduced to Aksys by Spike while looking for a company that could publish the game in North America.

Adventure game

Adventuregraphic adventurepoint-and-click adventure game
Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors is an adventure video game developed by Chunsoft.
From the early 1990s, Chunsoft, the developer for the NES version of Portopia, began producing a series of acclaimed visual novels known as the Sound Novels series, which include Otogirisō (1992), Kamaitachi no Yoru (1994), Machi (1998), 428: Shibuya Scramble (2008), and 999: Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors (2010).

Spike (company)

SpikeKing Of Colosseum IIKenka Bancho 5
The North American localization of the game was handled by Aksys Games; Chunsoft was introduced to Aksys by Spike while looking for a company that could publish the game in North America.
999: Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors

Visual novel

visual novelssound novelAdventure
In the Novel sections, the player progresses through the storyline and converses with non-playable characters through visual novel segments.
Their success has led to an increase in Japanese visual novels being localized for release outside Japan, including: KID's Ever 17: The Out of Infinity (2002), Cing's Another Code series (2005 onwards), Marvelous Entertainment's Lux-Pain (2008), Chunsoft's 999: Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors (2010), and Capcom's Ghost Trick: Phantom Detective (2010).

Rupert Sheldrake

morphic fieldmorphic resonancemorphic fields
The inspiration for the story was the question of where inspiration comes from; while researching it, Uchikoshi came across Rupert Sheldrake's morphic resonance hypothesis, which became the main focus of the game's science fiction elements.
The morphogenetic field plays a large role in the Nintendo DS game Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors.

Digital root

digital sumFull Digital Rootsum of its digits
This is set in part by special locks on numbered doors that are based on digital roots; each player has a bracelet with a different digit on it, and only groups of three to five with the total of their bracelet's number with the same digital root as marked on the door can pass through.
Digital roots form an important mechanic in the visual novel adventure game Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors.

Spike Chunsoft

ChunsoftChun SoftGachitora: The Roughneck Teacher in High School
Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors was developed by the Japanese game studio Chunsoft and directed by Kotaro Uchikoshi, and produced by Jiro Ishii. Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors is an adventure video game developed by Chunsoft.
Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors (2009)

Nintendo DS

DSNDSDownload Play
It is the first installment in the Zero Escape series, and was released in Japan in 2009 and in North America in 2010 for the Nintendo DS.

Science fiction

sci-fiscience-fictionSF
The inspiration for the story was the question of where inspiration comes from; while researching it, Uchikoshi came across Rupert Sheldrake's morphic resonance hypothesis, which became the main focus of the game's science fiction elements.

Kinu Nishimura

The music was composed by Shinji Hosoe, while the characters were designed by Kinu Nishimura.

Video game localization

localizationlocalizedlocalize
The localization was handled by Aksys Games; they worked by the philosophy of keeping true to the spirit of the original Japanese version, aiming for natural-sounding English rather than following the original's exact wording. The North American localization of the game was handled by Aksys Games; Chunsoft was introduced to Aksys by Spike while looking for a company that could publish the game in North America.

PlayStation Vita

VitaPS VitaPSVita
This bundle was released on Steam, the PlayStation Vita, and the PlayStation 4.

PlayStation 4

PS44Sony PlayStation 4
This bundle was released on Steam, the PlayStation Vita, and the PlayStation 4.

Gameplay

game playplayabilityplay
The gameplay is divided into two types of sections: Novel and Escape.

Non-player character

NPCNPCsnon-playable character
In the Novel sections, the player progresses through the storyline and converses with non-playable characters through visual novel segments.

First-person (gaming)

first-personfirst-person perspectivefirst person
These are presented from a first-person perspective, with the player being able to move between different pre-determined positions in each room.

Brain teaser

brain teasersbrain-teasersBrainteaser puzzle
The puzzles include various brain teasers, such as baccarat and magic squares.