Niuean language

NiueanNiueniuLanguages of NiueNiue language
Niuean (ko e vagahau Niuē) is a Polynesian language, belonging to the Malayo-Polynesian subgroup of the Austronesian languages.wikipedia
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Polynesian languages

PolynesianPolynesian languageEastern Polynesian
Niuean (ko e vagahau Niuē) is a Polynesian language, belonging to the Malayo-Polynesian subgroup of the Austronesian languages.
Tongan and Niuean constitute the Tongic branch; all of the rest are part of the Nuclear Polynesian branch.

Tongan language

TonganTongaton
It is most closely related to Tongan and slightly more distantly to other Polynesian languages such as Māori, Sāmoan, and Hawaiian.
Together with Niuean, it forms the Tongic subgroup of Polynesian.

Niue

Niue IslandNiue-FekaiNiueans
Niuean was spoken by 1600 people on Niue Island (97.4% of the inhabitants) in 1991, as well as by speakers in the Cook Islands, New Zealand, and Tonga, for a total of around 8,000 speakers.
Between 90% and 95% of Niuean people live in New Zealand, along with about 70% of the speakers of the Niuean language.

Tongic languages

Tongic
Together, Tongan and Niuean form the Tongic subgroup of the Polynesian languages.
It consists of at least two languages, Tongan and Niuean, and possibly a third, Niuafoʻouan.

Tonga

Kingdom of TongaFriendly IslandsTongan
Niuean was spoken by 1600 people on Niue Island (97.4% of the inhabitants) in 1991, as well as by speakers in the Cook Islands, New Zealand, and Tonga, for a total of around 8,000 speakers.
Tongan, a Polynesian language, is closely related to Wallisian (Uvean), Niuean, Hawaiian, and Samoan.

Austronesian languages

AustronesianAustronesian languageAustronesian language family
Niuean (ko e vagahau Niuē) is a Polynesian language, belonging to the Malayo-Polynesian subgroup of the Austronesian languages.

Macron (diacritic)

macronīŪ
Vowel length can be marked with a macron; however, this is not always done.

Dual (grammatical number)

dualdual numberdual form
Furthermore, first person non-singular (dual and plural) pronouns distinguish inclusive and exclusive forms, including and excluding the listener, respectively.
Austronesian languages, particularly Polynesian languages such as Hawaiian, Niuean and Tongan, possess a dual number for pronouns but not for nouns, as nouns are generally marked for plural syntactically and not morphologically.

Diane Massam

Massam, Diane
Diane Massam has extensively studied a special type of compounding which she has termed pseudo noun incorporation, a type of noun incorporation.
Massam specializes in the syntax of Niuean, an Austronesian language spoken in the South Pacific country of Niue.

Frequentative

past iterativefrequentive FREQUENTATIVE
Examples in Niuean are available here.

Malayo-Polynesian languages

Malayo-PolynesianMalayo-Polynesian languageMalayo-Polynesian language group
Niuean (ko e vagahau Niuē) is a Polynesian language, belonging to the Malayo-Polynesian subgroup of the Austronesian languages.

Māori language

MāoriMaorite reo Māori
It is most closely related to Tongan and slightly more distantly to other Polynesian languages such as Māori, Sāmoan, and Hawaiian.

Samoan language

SamoanSāmoansmo
It is most closely related to Tongan and slightly more distantly to other Polynesian languages such as Māori, Sāmoan, and Hawaiian.

Hawaiian language

HawaiianHawaiian forHawaii
It is most closely related to Tongan and slightly more distantly to other Polynesian languages such as Māori, Sāmoan, and Hawaiian.

Cook Islands

Cook IslandCookThe Cook Islands
Niuean was spoken by 1600 people on Niue Island (97.4% of the inhabitants) in 1991, as well as by speakers in the Cook Islands, New Zealand, and Tonga, for a total of around 8,000 speakers.

New Zealand

NZLNZKiwi
Niuean was spoken by 1600 people on Niue Island (97.4% of the inhabitants) in 1991, as well as by speakers in the Cook Islands, New Zealand, and Tonga, for a total of around 8,000 speakers.

Vowel length

shortlong vowellong
Vowel length is distinctive in Niuean; vowels are either long or short.

Hiatus (linguistics)

hiatusdiaeresishiatuses
Hiatus is the separate pronunciation of two adjacent vowels, as opposed to diphthongs which are written as two letters but pronounced as one sound.

Diphthong

diphthongsfalling diphthonggliding vowel
Hiatus is the separate pronunciation of two adjacent vowels, as opposed to diphthongs which are written as two letters but pronounced as one sound.

Morpheme

morphemesmorphemicderivational
Hiatus typically occurs across morpheme boundaries, for example, when a suffix ending with a vowel comes before a root beginning with that same vowel.