A report on No-hitter

Nolan Ryan holds the record for no-hitters in the major leagues with seven.
Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax threw four no-hitters, including one perfect game, during his MLB career.
Jason Varitek caught four no-hitters during his MLB career.
Mike Witt pitched in both a complete game no-hitter and a combined no-hitter.
Bob Feller pitched the first (and to date only) Opening Day no-hitter, in 1940.
Ken Johnson pitched a no-hitter in 1964 but was the losing pitcher of the game.
Matt Young allowed no hits in a 1992 game that is not considered a no-hitter because he only pitched eight innings.
Rich Hill had a potential no-hitter broken up in extra innings in 2017.
Justin Verlander threw his first two no-hitters for the Detroit Tigers, and more recently one for the Houston Astros.
Joe Musgrove pitched the most recent, and to date only, no-hitter for the San Diego Padres.
Len Barker's perfect game is the most recent no-hitter for the Cleveland Indians.

Game in which a team was not able to record a single hit through conventional means.

- No-hitter
Nolan Ryan holds the record for no-hitters in the major leagues with seven.

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Cleveland Guardians

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American professional baseball team based in Cleveland.

American professional baseball team based in Cleveland.

The team is named after the eight Guardians of Traffic statues displayed on the Hope Memorial Bridge next to their home field.
Cy Young on a 1911 baseball card
Nap Lajoie, who won the 1903 American League Batting Championship with the Indians, was the team's namesake from 1903 to 1915, and is an MLB Hall of Famer.
1909 Cleveland Naps
Tris Speaker on a 1933 baseball card
Bob Feller; winner of the A.L. pitching Triple Crown in 1940, member of the 1948 World Series Championship team, the Indians all-time leader in wins and strikeouts, and an MLB Hall of Famer.
Logo from 1946 to 1950
Lou Boudreau, 1948 American League MVP
Al Rosen, 1953 Most Valuable Player.
Herb Score – who was the 1955 American League Rookie of the Year, a two-time A.L. All-Star, and after his playing career went on to be the longest-tenured announcer in club history, serving 34 seasons (1964–1997) as a member of the Indians broadcast team.
In 1975, Frank Robinson became the first African-American manager in MLB history
Slider, the team mascot since 1990
Progressive Field in 2008
Kenny Lofton in 1996
Mark Shapiro – Indians GM from 2001 to 2010, President from 2010 to 2015, and two-time Sporting News Executive of the Year.
CC Sabathia won the 2007 AL Cy Young Award with the Indians.
Sabathia's teammate Cliff Lee won the AL Cy Young Award in 2008.
Mike Chernoff, who has served as Indians/Guardians' general manager since 2015.
Manager Terry Francona, who in his tenure with the Indians/Guardians is a two-time AL Manager of the Year (2013, 2016), led the team to the 2016 AL Championship, and is the all-time franchise leader in wins by a manager.
Corey Kluber, who is a two-time AL Cy Young Award winner with the Indians (2014, 2017).
Shane Bieber, who won the 2020 AL Cy Young Award, giving the team five winners in 14 seasons.
The Ohio Cup trophy
Guardians wordmark logo, featured on the team's home uniforms
Cleveland in "diamond C" font is featured on the team's road uniforms
Chief Wahoo logo used from 1950 through 2018
"Block C" logo used secondarily from 2014 until 2019, then as the team's primary logo from 2019 through 2021 - the final three years under the Indians name
Guardians TV announcer Matt Underwood (seated, center) and longtime lead radio announcer Tom Hamilton (right)
Earl Averill
Larry Doby
Mel Harder
Joe Sewell
Jim Thome

Feller, who had pitched a no-hitter to open the season and won 27 games, lost the final game of the season to unknown pitcher Floyd Giebell of the Detroit Tigers.

Houston Astros

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American professional baseball team based in Houston.

American professional baseball team based in Houston.

1905 Houston Buffaloes team photo
Colt .45s uniform
Houston Astrodome Scoreboard pictured during a June 7, 1969 game between the Astros and Cardinals
The Astrodome in 1965
Hall of Famer Joe Morgan (1963–1971, 1980) was traded to Cincinnati following the 1971 season
Cesar Cedeno (1970–1981) is the franchise's all-time leader with 487 steals
José Cruz (1975–1987), his #25 was retired by Houston
Astros starting pitcher Nolan Ryan in 1983
Mike Scott won the 1986 NL Cy Young Award and NLCS MVP
Final Astros regular season game in the Astrodome on October 3, 1999
The Astros moved into Minute Maid Park in 2000
2005 National League championship banner at Minute Maid Park
Astros' outfielder Orlando Palmeiro, 2007
Astros second baseman José Altuve in 2014
Many buildings in the skyline of Downtown Houston participated in cheering for the Astros during the 2017 World Series.
The Houston Astros began wearing this patch during the 2017 season as the Houston area recovered from the destruction caused by Hurricane Harvey.
2017 World Series MVP - George Springer
The 2017 team at the White House with President Donald Trump, March 2018
Justin Verlander, 2019 AL Cy Young Award winner
Jeff Bagwell (1991–2005), Hall of Famer
Craig Biggio (1988–2007), Hall of Famer
Lance Berkman (1999–2010)
Orbit, Houston Astros mascot from 1990 to 1999, 2013–present

The season started with a boost from pitcher Ken Forsch, who threw a no-hitter against the Braves the second game of the season.

Halladay pitching for the Blue Jays in 2009

Roy Halladay

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American professional baseball pitcher, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Toronto Blue Jays and Philadelphia Phillies between 1998 and 2013.

American professional baseball pitcher, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Toronto Blue Jays and Philadelphia Phillies between 1998 and 2013.

Halladay pitching for the Blue Jays in 2009
2001 Toronto Blue Jays #32 Roy Halladay road jersey (after 9/11)
Halladay with Toronto in 2006
Halladay pitching for the Phillies
Roy Halladay and Don Larsen, the only two pitchers to throw postseason no-hitters in MLB history
Halladay delivers a pitch in 2011
Halladay in 2011
Halladay in 2009, showing his characteristic sinker grip
Halladay's widow Brandy receiving his plaque during his induction ceremony into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2019

He made his major league debut in 1998, nearly pitching a no-hitter in his second career start.

Philadelphia Phillies

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American professional baseball team based in Philadelphia.

American professional baseball team based in Philadelphia.

1888 Philadelphia Quakers
Grover Cleveland Alexander, Phillies pitcher from 1911 to 1917 and 1930
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1964 Philadelphia Phillies
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Darren Daulton, Phillies' catcher from 1983, 1985 to 1997
Citizens Bank Park has been the Phillies' home since 2004.
Chase Utley, Phillies' second baseman from 2003 to 2015
Ryan Howard, Phillies' first baseman from 2004 to 2016
Roy Halladay, Phillies' pitcher from 2010 to 2013
Bryce Harper was signed by the team in 2019.
The Phillies play division rival New York Mets at Citizens Bank Park on September 29, 2017.
Gene Mauch, Phillies' manager from 1960 to 1968
Charlie Manuel, Phillies' manager from 2005 to 2013
Ed Delahanty, 1945 Hall of Fame inductee
Mike Schmidt, 1990 Wall of Fame inductee
Steve Carlton, Phillies' pitcher from 1972 to 1986
Chuck Klein, 1932 NL MVP and 1933 Triple Crown winner
John Kruk, Phillies first baseman from 1989 to 1994
8× Gold Glove winner Garry Maddox (1975–1986)
The Centennial Team plaque at the left end of the Wall of Fame
Coca-Cola Park in Allentown, Pennsylvania, home of the Lehigh Valley IronPigs, the Phillies' Triple-A affiliate, April 2009
Harry Kalas, Phillies broadcaster from 1971 to 2009
Phillies fans, who have a reputation for occasional unruly behavior, brawl with New York Mets fans at Shea Stadium, September 2007
Dick Allen

In the 2014 season, one of the few bright spots was the September 1 game against a division rival, the Atlanta Braves, when starter Cole Hamels and relievers Jake Diekman, Ken Giles, and Jonathan Papelbon combined for a no-hitter at Turner Field and a 7–0 victory over Atlanta.

Johnson in 2016

Randy Johnson

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American former professional baseball pitcher who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (1988–2009) for six teams, primarily the Seattle Mariners and Arizona Diamondbacks.

American former professional baseball pitcher who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (1988–2009) for six teams, primarily the Seattle Mariners and Arizona Diamondbacks.

Johnson in 2016
In 2001, Johnson struck a bird with a pitched ball, resulting in what ABC News described as a "sea of feathers".
Johnson with the Yankees
Johnson pitching for the Arizona Diamondbacks.
Johnson with the Giants in 2009
Johnson throwing out the ceremonial first pitch at the Seattle Mariners home opener at Safeco Field

He is also one of five pitchers to pitch no-hitters in both leagues, and one of 20 pitchers in history to record a win against all 30 MLB franchises.

New York Yankees

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American professional baseball team based in the New York City borough of The Bronx.

American professional baseball team based in the New York City borough of The Bronx.

Hilltop Park, home of the Highlanders
The Polo Grounds, home of the Yankees from 1913 to 1922, was demolished in 1964, after the Mets had moved to Shea Stadium in Flushing.
With his hitting prowess, Babe Ruth ushered in an offensive-oriented era of baseball and helped lead the Yankees to four World Series titles.
Lou Gehrig
In 1941, Joe DiMaggio set an MLB record with a 56-game hitting streak that stands to this day and will probably never be broken.
Opening Day of the 1951 baseball season at Griffith Stadium. President Harry Truman throws out the first ball as Bucky Harris and Casey Stengel look on.
Mickey Mantle was one of the franchise's most celebrated hitters, highlighted by his 1956 Triple Crown and World Series championship.
During 1974 and 1975, Yankee Stadium was renovated into its final shape and structure, as shown here in 2002, seven years before demolition.
The mask and catcher's mitt of Thurman Munson, the team captain who was killed in a plane crash in 1979
Don Mattingly headlined a Yankees franchise that struggled in the 1980s.
The Yankees' success in the late 1990s and early 2000s was built from a core of productive players that included Jorge Posada, Mariano Rivera, and Derek Jeter.
Yankees' third baseman Alex Rodriguez, 2007
Joe Girardi was a Yankees catcher before he became manager in 2008.
The new Yankee Stadium opened in 2009 and was christened with a World Series victory in the same way that the original Yankee Stadium was christened with a World Series victory when it opened in 1923.
Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge quickly became the new face of the team.
World Series rings
"Freddy Sez" holding one of his signs near the bleachers entrance before a game between the Yankees and the Texas Rangers
A shirt worn by a number of Bleacher Creatures
The grounds crew at Yankee Stadium dancing to "Y.M.C.A."
Announcers Michael Kay, Paul O'Neill, Ken Singleton, and Ryan Ruocco in the YES Network broadcast booth at Yankee Stadium in 2009
The first four in the row of retired numbers at the old Yankee Stadium
Yogi Berra
Joe DiMaggio
Whitey Ford
Derek Jeter
Reggie Jackson
Mickey Mantle
Babe Ruth
Mariano Rivera
Lou Gehrig

In Game 5 of the 1956 World Series against the Dodgers, pitcher Don Larsen threw the only perfect game in World Series history, which remains the only perfect game in postseason play and the only postseason no-hitter until 2010.

Boston Red Sox

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American professional baseball team based in Boston.

American professional baseball team based in Boston.

The Red Sox logo worn on uniforms in 1908, announcing the team's first official nickname
The 1901 Boston Americans team photograph
The Americans logo, 1901–07
Iconic photo of the Huntington Avenue Grounds before the first modern World Series game
A season pass for the 1906 season.
Babe Ruth in 1915
Ted Williams in 1954
The bullpen car used by the Red Sox
Carlton Fisk, best known for his "waving fair" home run in Game 6 of the 1975 World Series
Roger Clemens is the club's all-time strikeout (2,590), wins (192), and shutouts (38) leader
The Red Sox hosting a home game against the Atlanta Braves in July 2001
The Red Sox celebrate their clinching of the 2003 AL Wild Card with a victory over the Baltimore Orioles
David Ortiz was named 2004 ALCS MVP and 2013 World Series MVP. His #34 was retired by the club in 2017
2007 season final standing
Victorious Red Sox players being honored at the White House by President George W. Bush
The Massachusetts State House displaying a banner in honor of the Red Sox's 2013 World Series appearance. "B Strong" was a patch worn by the Red Sox in memory of Boston Marathon bombing victims
2018 ALCS MVP – Jackie Bradley Jr.
2018 World Series MVP – Steve Pearce
Left field grandstands during a 2014 game
Center field bleachers during a 2014 game
A spring training game at JetBlue Park
1907: Boston players leaving their hotel in Little Rock for a spring training game (photo courtesy of the Boston Public Library)
Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame at Fenway Park

Minor league call-up Clay Buchholz provided a spark on September 1 by pitching a no-hitter in his second career start.

Walter Johnson of the Washington Senators holds the career record with 110 shutouts.

Shutout (baseball)

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In Major League Baseball, a shutout (denoted statistically as ShO or SHO ) refers to the act by which a single pitcher pitches a complete game and does not allow the opposing team to score a run.

In Major League Baseball, a shutout (denoted statistically as ShO or SHO ) refers to the act by which a single pitcher pitches a complete game and does not allow the opposing team to score a run.

Walter Johnson of the Washington Senators holds the career record with 110 shutouts.
Ernie Shore (on the right next to Babe Ruth) earned a shutout without starting the game or pitching a complete game.
On June 3, 1995, Pedro Martínez pitched nine scoreless innings but did not record a shutout. The game went to extra innings, and Martínez lost his shutout opportunity when he was replaced in the 10th inning.
Nolan Ryan pitched a record seven no-hitters, all earning him a shutout as well since his opponents failed to score a run in any way. He led the league in shutouts three times and is ranked seventh all-time with 61.
Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Sandy Koufax led the National League with 11 shutouts and also won the league's Most Valuable Player and Cy Young Award in 1963. His 11 shutouts are also the single-season record by a left-handed pitcher.

A no-hitter completed by one pitcher is also a shutout unless the opposing team manages to score through a series of errors, base on balls, catcher's interferences, dropped third strikes, or hit batsmen.

Detroit Tigers

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American professional baseball team based in Detroit.

American professional baseball team based in Detroit.

1900 Detroit Tigers team photo
Logo (1901 to 1902)
Ty Cobb in 1913
1908 World Series program
Hank Greenberg
Hal Newhouser
Hall of Fame member Al Kaline, nicknamed "Mr. Tiger" (1953–1974), was an 18× All-Star
1968 World Series program and tickets for Games 4 and 5 at Tiger Stadium
Mickey Lolich was the 1968 World Series MVP
Willie Horton (1963–1977) had his No. 23 retired by the club
Mark "The Bird" Fidrych, 1976 AL Rookie of the Year
Sparky Anderson was the manager of the Tigers from 1979 to 1995
Kirk Gibson, a Michigan State alumni, hit the clinching home run in Game 5 of the 1984 World Series
1984 World Series MVP, Alan Trammell (SS)
Cecil Fielder in 1996
The entrance sign of Comerica Park
Magglio Ordóñez hit a walk-off home run to clinch the 2006 AL pennant
Curtis Granderson in 2007
Justin Verlander, June 2008
Alex Avila, March 2010
In 2012, Miguel Cabrera became the first Major League player to win the Triple Crown in 45 years.
Delmon Young (left) and Prince Fielder (right) in 2012
Jim Leyland, manager from 2006 to 2013
Tiger Stadium, home of the Detroit Tigers from 1912 to 1999 at the corner of Michigan and Trumbull Avenues in the Corktown district of Detroit
Tigers opening day 2007; view from section 324 at Comerica Park
Outfielder Ron LeFlore wearing the traditional Tigers home uniform with navy blue piping down the front and an Old English "D" on the left chest
Mickey Cochrane
Sam Crawford
Charlie Gehringer
Harry Heilmann
George Kell
Lou Whitaker
Ernie Harwell (Tigers broadcaster: 1960–2002)

A bright spot in 1912 was George Mullin pitching the franchise's first no-hitter in a 7–0 win over the St. Louis Browns on July 4, his 32nd birthday.

St. Louis Cardinals

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American professional baseball team based in St. Louis.

American professional baseball team based in St. Louis.

Charles Comiskey, shown here circa 1910, guided the Browns to four American Association titles.
Rogers Hornsby won two Triple Crowns as a Cardinal.
Stan Musial retired owning numerous National League and team batting records.
Bob Gibson, the most decorated pitcher in team history, won two Cy Young Awards.
Pitcher Chris Carpenter, essential in two World Series titles, won 10 playoff games with a 3.00 postseason ERA.
Albert Pujols is one of the most accomplished players in Cardinals' history.
Sportsman's Park during the 1946 World Series
Busch Memorial Stadium, home stadium from 1966 to 2005
St. Louis logo (1900–1919)
St. Louis mascot Fredbird, 2013
Red Schoendienst (1965–76, 1980, 1990)
Tony La Russa (1996–2011)
Joe Medwick's Triple Crown in 1937 is the last in the history of the National League
Lou Brock
Dizzy Dean
Curt Flood
Enos Slaughter
Ozzie Smith
Bruce Sutter
Harry Caray

George Bradley hurled the first no-hitter in Major League history.