Noah

NoachianNoebecome intoxicatedbiblical character Noahbiblical flooddelugeGod's rainbow covenant to NoahNoachian floodNoachic floodNoah: Awal Semula
In Abrahamic religions, Noah was the tenth and last of the pre-Flood Patriarchs.wikipedia
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Curse of Ham

cursedactionscurse on Noah's son Ham
The biblical account is followed by the story of the Curse of Ham.
The Curse of Ham is the curse upon Canaan, Ham's son, that was imposed by the biblical patriarch Noah.

Antediluvian

AntedeluvianAntediluvian Worldas old as Noah's Ark
In Abrahamic religions, Noah was the tenth and last of the pre-Flood Patriarchs.
In the Christian Bible and Hebrew Torah, the Antediluvian period begins with the Fall of the first Man and woman, according to Genesis and ends with the destruction of all life on the earth except those saved with Noah in the ark (Noah and his wife, his three sons and their wives).

Abrahamic religions

AbrahamicAbrahamic faithsAbrahamic religion
In Abrahamic religions, Noah was the tenth and last of the pre-Flood Patriarchs.
Its adherents, the Mandaeans, revere Adam, Abel, Seth, Enos, Noah, Shem, Aram, and especially John the Baptist.

Book of Genesis

GenesisGen.Gen
The primary account of Noah in the Bible is in the Book of Genesis. The Genesis flood narrative makes up chapters 6–9 in the Book of Genesis, in the Bible.
The primeval history sets out the author's (or authors') concepts of the nature of the deity and of humankind's relationship with its maker: God creates a world which is good and fit for mankind, but when man corrupts it with sin God decides to destroy his creation, saving only the righteous Noah to reestablish the relationship between man and God.

Noah's Ark

Arkthe ArkFlood
The story of Noah's Ark is told in the Bible's Genesis flood narrative. The narrative, one of many flood myths found in human cultures, indicates that God intended to return the Earth to its pre-Creation state of watery chaos by flooding the Earth because of humanity's misdeeds and then remake it using the microcosm of Noah's ark.
Noah's Ark (תיבת נח; Biblical Hebrew: Tevat Noaḥ) is the vessel in the Genesis flood narrative (Genesis chapters 6–9) through which God spares Noah, his family, and a remnant of all the world's animals from a world-engulfing flood.

Genesis flood narrative

Great FloodFloodDeluge
The story of Noah's Ark is told in the Bible's Genesis flood narrative.
Noah was a righteous man and walked with God.

Shem

SemSamSaam
When Noah was five hundred years old, he became the father of Shem, Ham and Japheth.
Islamic literature describes Shem as one of the believing sons of Noah.

Noah in rabbinic literature

NoahRabbinic literaturerabbinic literature on Noah
In Jewish tradition and rabbinic literature on Noah, rabbis blame Satan for the intoxicating properties of the wine.
Allusions in rabbinic literature to the Biblical character Noah, who saved his family and representatives of all the animals from a great flood by constructing an ark, contain various expansions, elaborations and inferences beyond what is presented in the text of the Bible itself.

Nimrod

King Nimroda character frombiblical character of the same name
(10:2–5) Ham’s son Cush had a son named Nimrod, who became the first man of might on earth, a mighty hunter, king in Babylon and the land of Shinar.
Nimrod (, ܢܡܪܘܕ, النمرود an-Namrūd), a biblical figure described as a king in the land of Shinar (Mesopotamia), was, according to the Book of Genesis and Books of Chronicles, the son of Cush, the son of Ham, son of Noah.

Cush (Bible)

CushCushiteCush, son of Ham
(10:2–5) Ham’s son Cush had a son named Nimrod, who became the first man of might on earth, a mighty hunter, king in Babylon and the land of Shinar.
Cush or Kush (, Kush) was, according to the Bible, the eldest son of Ham, a son of Noah.

Ashur

Asshur
(10:6–10) From there Asshur went and built Nineveh.
Ashur was the second son of Shem, the son of Noah.

Flood myth

DelugeGreat Floodflood
The narrative, one of many flood myths found in human cultures, indicates that God intended to return the Earth to its pre-Creation state of watery chaos by flooding the Earth because of humanity's misdeeds and then remake it using the microcosm of Noah's ark.
Righteous Noah is given instructions to build an ark.

Biblical Hittites

HittiteHittitesHeth
(10:11–12) Canaan’s descendants Sidon, Heth, the Jebusites, the Amorites, the Girgashites, the Hivites, the Arkites, the Sinites, the Arvadites, the Zemarites, and the Hamathites spread out from Sidon as far as Gerar, near Gaza, and as far as Sodom and Gomorrah.
Their ancestor Heth (, ḥt in the consonant-only Hebrew script) is said in Genesis to be a son of Canaan, son of Ham, son of Noah.

Sidon

SaidaSaïdaSídōn
(10:11–12) Canaan’s descendants Sidon, Heth, the Jebusites, the Amorites, the Girgashites, the Hivites, the Arkites, the Sinites, the Arvadites, the Zemarites, and the Hamathites spread out from Sidon as far as Gerar, near Gaza, and as far as Sodom and Gomorrah.
In the Book of Genesis, Sidon was the first-born son of Canaan, who was a son of Ham, thereby making Sidon a great-grandson of Noah.

Al-A'raf

77. Al-ArafAl Aaraaf
Noah was the subject of much elaboration in the literature of later Abrahamic religions, including the Quran (Surahs 71, 7, 1, and 21).
Story of Noah, which begins with the prophet warning his people and then the community rejecting the message and facing a punishment, the Grand Deluge.

Book of Enoch

1 EnochEnochthe Book of Enoch
In 10:1–3 of the Book of Enoch (which is part of the Orthodox Tewahedo biblical canon), Uriel was dispatched by "the Most High" to inform Noah of the approaching "deluge".
The Book of Enoch (also 1 Enoch; Ge'ez: መጽሐፈ ሄኖክ mets’iḥāfe hēnoki) is an ancient Jewish religious work, ascribed by tradition to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah.

Genesis Apocryphon

1QapGen.Apocalypse of LamechApocryphon of Genesis
In particular, "The Genesis Apocryphon devotes considerable space to Noah."
The document records a pseudepigraphal conversation between the biblical figure Lamech, son of Methuselah, and his son, Noah, as well as first and third person narratives associated with Abraham.

Abraham

IbrahimAbramAbraham the Patriarch
The Encyclopedia Judaica adds that there is a strong suggestion that "an intermediate agent was active. The people most likely to have fulfilled this role are the Hurrians, whose territory included the city of Haran, where the Patriarch Abraham had his roots. The Hurrians inherited the Flood story from Babylonia".
Terah, the ninth in descent from Noah, was the father of three sons: Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

Moses

MosaicMosheMusa
The maximum human lifespan, as depicted by the Bible, diminishes thereafter, from almost 1,000 years to the 120 years of Moses.
34:7) and that "his eye had not dimmed, and his vigor had not diminished," the phrase "may you live to 120" has become a common blessing among Jews, especially since 120 is elsewhere stated as the maximum age for Noah's descendants (one interpretation of ).

Bible

biblicalScripturethe Bible
The Genesis flood narrative makes up chapters 6–9 in the Book of Genesis, in the Bible.
These are ancient Jewish religious works, traditionally ascribed to the prophet Enoch, the great-grandfather of the patriarch Noah.

Eber

HeberAberAbir
(10:15–19) Among Shem’s descendants was Eber.
Eber was a great-grandson of Noah's son Shem and the father of Peleg born when Eber was 34 years old, and of Joktan.

Patriarchs (Bible)

Patriarchspatriarchbiblical patriarchs
In Abrahamic religions, Noah was the tenth and last of the pre-Flood Patriarchs.
Adam 930 years, Seth 912, Enos 905, Kenan 910, Mahalalel 895, Jared 962, Enoch 365 (did not die, but was taken away by God), Methuselah 969, Lamech 777, Noah 950.

Japheth

JaphetYafetIafet
When Noah was five hundred years old, he became the father of Shem, Ham and Japheth.
In the Polish tradition of Sarmatism, the Sarmatians were said to be descended from Japheth, son of Noah, enabling the Polish nobility to imagine themselves able to trace their ancestry directly to Noah.

Ziusudra

Epic of ZiusudraXisuthrosZi-ud-sura
Also, the name of the hero differs between the traditions: "The earliest Mesopotamian flood account, written in the Sumerian language, calls the deluge hero Ziusudra."
Ziusudra is one of several mythic characters that are protagonists of near-eastern Flood myths, including Atrahasis, Utnapishtim and the biblical Noah - although each story has distinctive elements, many key story elements are common to two, three, or four versions.

Quran

Qur'anKoranQur'anic
Noah was the subject of much elaboration in the literature of later Abrahamic religions, including the Quran (Surahs 71, 7, 1, and 21).
Adam, Enoch, Noah, Eber, Shelah, Abraham, Lot, Ishmael, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, Job, Jethro, David, Solomon, Elijah, Elisha, Jonah, Aaron, Moses, Zechariah, John the Baptist and Jesus are mentioned in the Quran as prophets of God (see Prophets of Islam).