A report on Standing wave and Node (physics)

Animation of a standing wave ( red ) created by the superposition of a left traveling ( blue ) and right traveling ( green ) wave
A standing wave. The red dots are the wave nodes
Longitudinal standing wave
Pattern of two waves' interference (from up to down). The point represents the node.
Transient analysis of a damped traveling wave reflecting at a boundary
Standing wave in stationary medium. The red dots represent the wave nodes.
A standing wave (black) depicted as the sum of two propagating waves traveling in opposite directions (red and blue).
Electric force vector (E) and magnetic force vector (H) of a standing wave.
Standing waves in a string – the fundamental mode and the first 5 harmonics.
A standing wave on a circular membrane, an example of standing waves in two dimensions. This is the fundamental mode.
A higher harmonic standing wave on a disk with two nodal lines crossing at the center.

A node is a point along a standing wave where the wave has minimum amplitude.

- Node (physics)

The locations at which the absolute value of the amplitude is minimum are called nodes, and the locations where the absolute value of the amplitude is maximum are called antinodes.

- Standing wave
Animation of a standing wave ( red ) created by the superposition of a left traveling ( blue ) and right traveling ( green ) wave

2 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Incident wave (blue) is fully reflected (red wave) out of phase at short-circuited end of transmission line, creating a net voltage (black) standing wave. Γ = −1, SWR = ∞.

Standing wave ratio

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Measure of impedance matching of loads to the characteristic impedance of a transmission line or waveguide.

Measure of impedance matching of loads to the characteristic impedance of a transmission line or waveguide.

Incident wave (blue) is fully reflected (red wave) out of phase at short-circuited end of transmission line, creating a net voltage (black) standing wave. Γ = −1, SWR = ∞.
Standing waves on transmission line, net voltage shown in different colors during one period of oscillation. Incoming wave from left (amplitude = 1) is partially reflected with (top to bottom) Γ = 0.6, −0.333, and 0.8 ∠60°. Resulting SWR = 4, 2, 9.
Example of estimated bandwidth of antenna according to the schedule VSWR by the help of the Ansys HFSS
Slotted line. The probe moves along the line to measure the variable voltage. SWR is the maximum divided by the minimum voltage
A directional wattmeter using a rotatable directional coupler element.

Impedance mismatches result in standing waves along the transmission line, and SWR is defined as the ratio of the partial standing wave's amplitude at an antinode (maximum) to the amplitude at a node (minimum) along the line.

Increase of amplitude as damping decreases and frequency approaches resonant frequency of a driven damped simple harmonic oscillator.

Resonance

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Applied periodic force is equal or close to a natural frequency of the system on which it acts.

Applied periodic force is equal or close to a natural frequency of the system on which it acts.

Increase of amplitude as damping decreases and frequency approaches resonant frequency of a driven damped simple harmonic oscillator.
Pushing a person in a swing is a common example of resonance. The loaded swing, a pendulum, has a natural frequency of oscillation, its resonant frequency, and resists being pushed at a faster or slower rate.
An RLC series circuit
A mass on a spring has one natural frequency, as it has a single degree of freedom
A standing wave (in black), created when two waves moving from left and right meet and superimpose
Standing waves in a string – the fundamental mode and the first 5 harmonics.
School resonating mass experiment
Animation illustrating electrical resonance in a tuned circuit, consisting of a capacitor (C) and an inductor (L) connected together. Charge flows back and forth between the capacitor plates through the inductor. Energy oscillates back and forth between the capacitor's electric field (E) and the inductor's magnetic field (B).
NMR Magnet at HWB-NMR, Birmingham, UK. In its strong 21.2-tesla field, the proton resonance is at 900 MHz.
High and low Q factor
"Universal Resonance Curve", a symmetric approximation to the normalized response of a resonant circuit; abscissa values are deviation from center frequency, in units of center frequency divided by 2Q; ordinate is relative amplitude, and phase in cycles; dashed curves compare the range of responses of real two-pole circuits for a Q value of 5; for higher Q values, there is less deviation from the universal curve. Crosses mark the edges of the 3 dB bandwidth (gain 0.707, phase shift 45° or 0.125 cycle).

In many cases these systems have the potential to resonate at certain frequencies, forming standing waves with large-amplitude oscillations at fixed positions.

At fixed positions called nodes, the string is never displaced.