Non-renewable resource

non-renewable resourcesnon-renewablenon-renewable energyfinite resourcenonrenewable resourcelimited resourcesnon-renewable fuelnon-renewable natural resourcenon-renewablesnonrenewable energy
A non-renewable resource (also called a finite resource) is a resource of economic value that cannot be readily replaced by natural means at a quick enough pace to keep up with consumption.wikipedia
248 Related Articles

Natural gas

gasgas-firednatural-gas
Earth minerals and metal ores, fossil fuels (coal, petroleum, natural gas) and groundwater in certain aquifers are all considered non-renewable resources, though individual elements are always conserved (except in nuclear reactions).
Natural gas is a non-renewable hydrocarbon used as a source of energy for heating, cooking, and electricity generation.

Fossil fuel

fossil fuelsoil and gasOil & Gas
Earth minerals and metal ores, fossil fuels (coal, petroleum, natural gas) and groundwater in certain aquifers are all considered non-renewable resources, though individual elements are always conserved (except in nuclear reactions).
Although natural processes continually form fossil fuels, such fuels are generally classified as non-renewable resources because they take millions of years to form and the known viable reserves are being depleted much faster than new ones are being made.

Earth

Earth's surfaceterrestrialworld
Earth minerals and metal ores, fossil fuels (coal, petroleum, natural gas) and groundwater in certain aquifers are all considered non-renewable resources, though individual elements are always conserved (except in nuclear reactions).
Those termed non-renewable resources, such as fossil fuels, only renew over geological timescales.

Resource depletion

depletiondepleteddepletion of natural resources
An unregulated industry practice or method can lead to a complete resource depletion.
Natural resources are commonly divided between renewable resources and non-renewable resources (see also mineral resource classification).

Renewable resource

renewablerenewable sourcesrenewable energy sources
Conversely, resources such as timber (when harvested sustainably) and wind (used to power energy conversion systems) are considered renewable resources, largely because their localized replenishment can occur within time frames meaningful to humans as well.

Natural resource

natural resourcesresourcesmineral resources
Natural resources, known as renewable resources, are replaced by natural processes and forces persistent in the natural environment.

Incineration

incineratorincineratorsincinerated
The material is then either incinerated, buried in a landfill or recycled for reuse.
The rest – mainly plastics and other oil and gas derived products – is generally treated as non-renewables.

Sustainable agriculture

sustainablesustainable farmingsustainable agricultural
Sustainable agriculture is the cultivation of plant and animal materials in a manner that preserves plant and animal ecosystems and that can improve soil health and soil fertility over the long term.
Otherwise, the water source effectively becomes a non-renewable resource.

Water

H 2 OHOliquid water
In the natural environment water, forests, plants and animals are all renewable resources, as long as they are adequately monitored, protected and conserved.
Therefore, it is the relatively small quantity of water in reserve in the earth (about 1% of our drinking water supply, which is replenished in aquifers around every 1 to 10 years), that is a non-renewable resource, and it is, rather, the distribution of potable and irrigation water which is scarce, rather than the actual amount of it that exists on the earth.

2000s energy crisis

oil crisisEffects of 2000s energy crisishigh gasoline prices of 2007 and 2008
This is reinforced by climate change concerns, nuclear dangers and accumulating radioactive waste, high oil prices, peak oil and increasing government support for renewable energy.
Petroleum is a limited resource, and the remaining accessible reserves are consumed more rapidly each year.

Reserves-to-production ratio

R/P ratiomineral reservesreserve to production ratio
The reserves-to-production ratio (RPR or R/P) is the remaining amount of a non-renewable resource, expressed in time.

Hotelling's rule

Hotelling rentHotelling-Faustmann model
The first model is defined by Hotelling's rule, which is a 1931 economic model of non-renewable resource management by Harold Hotelling.
Hotelling's rule defines the net price path as a function of time while maximizing economic rent in the time of fully extracting a non-renewable natural resource.

Hartwick's rule

The Hartwick's rule provides an important result about the sustainability of welfare in an economy that uses non-renewable source.
In resource economics, Hartwick's rule defines the amount of investment in produced capital (buildings, roads, knowledge stocks, etc.) that is needed to exactly offset declining stocks of non-renewable resources.

Fossil water

water miningfossil aquiferfossil aquifers
In arid regions, some aquifers containing available and usable water receive little to no significant recharge, effectively making groundwater in those aquifers a non-renewable resource.

Mineral

mineralsmineral depositsaccessory mineral
Earth minerals and metal ores, fossil fuels (coal, petroleum, natural gas) and groundwater in certain aquifers are all considered non-renewable resources, though individual elements are always conserved (except in nuclear reactions).

Metal

metalsmetal ionsmetal ion
Earth minerals and metal ores, fossil fuels (coal, petroleum, natural gas) and groundwater in certain aquifers are all considered non-renewable resources, though individual elements are always conserved (except in nuclear reactions).

Ore

oresore depositmineral deposit
Earth minerals and metal ores, fossil fuels (coal, petroleum, natural gas) and groundwater in certain aquifers are all considered non-renewable resources, though individual elements are always conserved (except in nuclear reactions).

Coal

coal seamcoal industrycoal-fired
Earth minerals and metal ores, fossil fuels (coal, petroleum, natural gas) and groundwater in certain aquifers are all considered non-renewable resources, though individual elements are always conserved (except in nuclear reactions).

Petroleum

crude oiloilcrude
Earth minerals and metal ores, fossil fuels (coal, petroleum, natural gas) and groundwater in certain aquifers are all considered non-renewable resources, though individual elements are always conserved (except in nuclear reactions).

Groundwater

ground waterunderground waterpore water
Earth minerals and metal ores, fossil fuels (coal, petroleum, natural gas) and groundwater in certain aquifers are all considered non-renewable resources, though individual elements are always conserved (except in nuclear reactions).

Aquifer

aquifersaquitardaquiclude
Earth minerals and metal ores, fossil fuels (coal, petroleum, natural gas) and groundwater in certain aquifers are all considered non-renewable resources, though individual elements are always conserved (except in nuclear reactions).

Chemical element

elementelementschemical elements
Earth minerals and metal ores, fossil fuels (coal, petroleum, natural gas) and groundwater in certain aquifers are all considered non-renewable resources, though individual elements are always conserved (except in nuclear reactions).

Nuclear reaction

nuclear reactionsnuclearreaction
Earth minerals and metal ores, fossil fuels (coal, petroleum, natural gas) and groundwater in certain aquifers are all considered non-renewable resources, though individual elements are always conserved (except in nuclear reactions).

Lumber

timberdimensional lumber2x4
Conversely, resources such as timber (when harvested sustainably) and wind (used to power energy conversion systems) are considered renewable resources, largely because their localized replenishment can occur within time frames meaningful to humans as well.

Sustainable forest management

sustainable forestryforest conservationsustainable management
Conversely, resources such as timber (when harvested sustainably) and wind (used to power energy conversion systems) are considered renewable resources, largely because their localized replenishment can occur within time frames meaningful to humans as well.